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IU Maurer close to naming new dean

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Fourteen months after formally beginning a dean search, the Indiana University Maurer School of Law could be welcoming a new dean before the end of November.

An unranked list of recommended candidates for the dean’s post has been submitted by the search committee to IU Provost and former IU Maurer dean Lauren Robel. The provost will select the next law school dean.

“I feel very upbeat and am looking forward to seeing what happens,” said John Applegate, search committee chair and executive vice president for University Regional Affairs, Planning and Policy.

Although the timing depends on the provost, Applegate expects a new dean could be named in a couple of weeks.

Applegate led the second search committee that was convened in June after the first search committee, named in August of 2012, concluded its work without a new dean being named. The university did not disclose if the first committee had interviewed any candidates or made any recommendations, but Applegate attributed the extension of the search to needing extra time to find the right individual to lead the school.

The second committee included Maurer faculty members along with alumni and members of the bench and bar. Applegate praised his committee, calling them “wonderful” and “a great group of people.”  

Applegate acknowledged the next Maurer dean will be taking the helm at a time of real change in legal education. He said maneuvering the shifting landscape of what students must be taught as well as helping students with their career development have got to be the main focus of the next dean.

However, Applegate called the Maurer deanship a “plum job” because the law school is highly ranked, and it not only is connected with a university of national reputation but also gets strong support from the university.

Maurer has been led by interim Dean Hannah Buxbaum since December 2011 when Robel took over the provost duties. Robel was dean of the law school from 2003 until she was named interim university provost. She was officially appointed as provost in June 2012.

“Everybody would agree that Hannah Buxbaum has been a wonderful interim dean,” Applegate said. “We’re huge fans.”    

 

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  • Mental Health issues
    The Lord blesses you, Andrew. You have been given a heavy cross to bear. Seek Him, all will be made right in the end. The last will be first, the first will be last. As for your comments as to mental health, watch closely, for it is used by the Indy authorities most cynically. When an insider gets caught up in some bad stuff, well then off to JLAP for an off the radar fix and then right back at the front of the pack. But when some undesirable, like me, maybe like you, shows up, then JLAP is tapped to "take out the trash." I document this operation (including false reports and non precedential processing) in my federal complaint and briefs to the SCOTUS (the second one with Notre Dame's Charlie Rice) at this site: http://www.archangelinstitute.org/archangel-michael/ THUS you are correct on many levels, and your insight and desire to see change should that SHOULD recommend you for an interview for this position. BUT it is obvious you are not among the ruling elite, so instead look forward to much trouble in this life before the Great Day of the Lord finally dawns.
  • Disability, Service, and the Legal Profession
    I should mention that my crushed him and leg broken in 4 places happened on my way to work at the Indiana Supreme Court, where I provided services to all 400+ trial courts in our state. My bipolar disorder may have been the result of my father being stationed at Camp LeJeune, North Carolina, in 1969. I was born at Camp LeJeune Naval Hospital, and there was (remains) 1.1 million gallons of gasoline under the ground, polluting the water supply, in addition to TCE and PCE. Many of the children of veterans stationed there have neurobehavioral effects from exposure. My life started with mental disabilities that happened because my father served this country. I didn't choose that, but it happened. My physical disabilities happened because I chose to serve the State of Indiana at the Indiana Supreme Court. I think I'd make a good person to be a symbol for disabilities, service, and the legal profession. -Andrew Straw
    • Disability Law and Disabled Students
      I applied for this position because the Law School has not made disabled students a priority. There was just one accommodation link on the School's webpage, and it was broken when I applied 6 weeks ago and as of right now it is still broken. The Law School lists how many women and minority students are in each class, but there is no mention of disability. There are no student groups for students with a disability, and only one class on this topic (the clinic). I applied because Indiana--as so many places around the country--has problems with disability rights in the legal profession. For instance, the Board of Law Examiners discriminates against those who have a mental disability. Even the federal courthouse in South Bend has no handicapped parking. It is 2013. Why is this so? I submit that it is so because each passing class of law students that is selected without an emphasis on encouraging disabled students is a class that sees disabilities as something to hide and be ashamed of. Disabilities are things that get punished in lawyers, weaknesses that are not rewarded in a very competitive profession. That's not how it should be, and not how it has to be. Indiana has had judges commit suicide, and this happens because our legal system discourages talking about mental illness. Instead, it is punished, because if you are identified as having an affective disorder, the Supreme Court can remove you. I hope the next dean at least sees fit to ensure the accommodations link gets fixed. It would be nice if the Law School started taking disabilities and disability rights seriously, started welcoming and inviting disabled law students. It would be nice if we had faculty teaching disability rights as civil and human rights, like other law schools do. Soon the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will be ratified by the Senate. 138 nations have ratified already. Disabled people wait for the USA to do the right thing. How will the Law School celebrate when it is so far behind? I would have enjoyed providing leadership in this area. I was physically disabled driving to work to the Indiana Supreme Court from Bloomington. I was discriminated against due my mental illness by the Board of Law Examiners. I hope that the new dean will work to ensure that disabled people in Indiana start being welcomed into the profession. Andrew Straw, '97 Founder, Disability Party of the United States http://www.facebook.com/DisabilityParty andrew@andrewstraw.com

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    1. I grew up on a farm and live in the county and it's interesting that the big industrial farmers like Jeff Shoaf don't live next to their industrial operations...

    2. So that none are misinformed by my posting wihtout a non de plume here, please allow me to state that I am NOT an Indiana licensed attorney, although I am an Indiana resident approved to practice law and represent clients in Indiana's fed court of Nth Dist and before the 7th circuit. I remain licensed in KS, since 1996, no discipline. This must be clarified since the IN court records will reveal that I did sit for and pass the Indiana bar last February. Yet be not confused by the fact that I was so allowed to be tested .... I am not, to be clear in the service of my duty to be absolutely candid about this, I AM NOT a member of the Indiana bar, and might never be so licensed given my unrepented from errors of thought documented in this opinion, at fn2, which likely supports Mr Smith's initial post in this thread: http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-7th-circuit/1592921.html

    3. When I served the State of Kansas as Deputy AG over Consumer Protection & Antitrust for four years, supervising 20 special agents and assistant attorneys general (back before the IBLE denied me the right to practice law in Indiana for not having the right stuff and pretty much crushed my legal career) we had a saying around the office: Resist the lure of the ring!!! It was a take off on Tolkiem, the idea that absolute power (I signed investigative subpoenas as a judge would in many other contexts, no need to show probable cause)could corrupt absolutely. We feared that we would overreach constitutional limits if not reminded, over and over, to be mindful to not do so. Our approach in so challenging one another was Madisonian, as the following quotes from the Father of our Constitution reveal: The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse. We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties. I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations. Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power. All men having power ought to be mistrusted. -- James Madison, Federalist Papers and other sources: http://www.constitution.org/jm/jm_quotes.htm RESIST THE LURE OF THE RING ALL YE WITH POLITICAL OR JUDICIAL POWER!

    4. My dear Mr Smith, I respect your opinions and much enjoy your posts here. We do differ on our view of the benefits and viability of the American Experiment in Ordered Liberty. While I do agree that it could be better, and that your points in criticism are well taken, Utopia does indeed mean nowhere. I think Madison, Jefferson, Adams and company got it about as good as it gets in a fallen post-Enlightenment social order. That said, a constitution only protects the citizens if it is followed. We currently have a bevy of public officials and judicial agents who believe that their subjectivism, their personal ideology, their elitist fears and concerns and cause celebs trump the constitutions of our forefathers. This is most troubling. More to follow in the next post on that subject.

    5. Yep I am not Bryan Brown. Bryan you appear to be a bigger believer in the Constitution than I am. Were I still a big believer then I might be using my real name like you. Personally, I am no longer a fan of secularism. I favor the confessional state. In religious mattes, it seems to me that social diversity is chaos and conflict, while uniformity is order and peace.... secularism has been imposed by America on other nations now by force and that has not exactly worked out very well.... I think the American historical experiment with disestablishmentarianism is withering on the vine before our eyes..... Since I do not know if that is OK for an officially licensed lawyer to say, I keep the nom de plume.

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