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IU Maurer close to naming new dean

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Fourteen months after formally beginning a dean search, the Indiana University Maurer School of Law could be welcoming a new dean before the end of November.

An unranked list of recommended candidates for the dean’s post has been submitted by the search committee to IU Provost and former IU Maurer dean Lauren Robel. The provost will select the next law school dean.

“I feel very upbeat and am looking forward to seeing what happens,” said John Applegate, search committee chair and executive vice president for University Regional Affairs, Planning and Policy.

Although the timing depends on the provost, Applegate expects a new dean could be named in a couple of weeks.

Applegate led the second search committee that was convened in June after the first search committee, named in August of 2012, concluded its work without a new dean being named. The university did not disclose if the first committee had interviewed any candidates or made any recommendations, but Applegate attributed the extension of the search to needing extra time to find the right individual to lead the school.

The second committee included Maurer faculty members along with alumni and members of the bench and bar. Applegate praised his committee, calling them “wonderful” and “a great group of people.”  

Applegate acknowledged the next Maurer dean will be taking the helm at a time of real change in legal education. He said maneuvering the shifting landscape of what students must be taught as well as helping students with their career development have got to be the main focus of the next dean.

However, Applegate called the Maurer deanship a “plum job” because the law school is highly ranked, and it not only is connected with a university of national reputation but also gets strong support from the university.

Maurer has been led by interim Dean Hannah Buxbaum since December 2011 when Robel took over the provost duties. Robel was dean of the law school from 2003 until she was named interim university provost. She was officially appointed as provost in June 2012.

“Everybody would agree that Hannah Buxbaum has been a wonderful interim dean,” Applegate said. “We’re huge fans.”    

 

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  • Mental Health issues
    The Lord blesses you, Andrew. You have been given a heavy cross to bear. Seek Him, all will be made right in the end. The last will be first, the first will be last. As for your comments as to mental health, watch closely, for it is used by the Indy authorities most cynically. When an insider gets caught up in some bad stuff, well then off to JLAP for an off the radar fix and then right back at the front of the pack. But when some undesirable, like me, maybe like you, shows up, then JLAP is tapped to "take out the trash." I document this operation (including false reports and non precedential processing) in my federal complaint and briefs to the SCOTUS (the second one with Notre Dame's Charlie Rice) at this site: http://www.archangelinstitute.org/archangel-michael/ THUS you are correct on many levels, and your insight and desire to see change should that SHOULD recommend you for an interview for this position. BUT it is obvious you are not among the ruling elite, so instead look forward to much trouble in this life before the Great Day of the Lord finally dawns.
  • Disability, Service, and the Legal Profession
    I should mention that my crushed him and leg broken in 4 places happened on my way to work at the Indiana Supreme Court, where I provided services to all 400+ trial courts in our state. My bipolar disorder may have been the result of my father being stationed at Camp LeJeune, North Carolina, in 1969. I was born at Camp LeJeune Naval Hospital, and there was (remains) 1.1 million gallons of gasoline under the ground, polluting the water supply, in addition to TCE and PCE. Many of the children of veterans stationed there have neurobehavioral effects from exposure. My life started with mental disabilities that happened because my father served this country. I didn't choose that, but it happened. My physical disabilities happened because I chose to serve the State of Indiana at the Indiana Supreme Court. I think I'd make a good person to be a symbol for disabilities, service, and the legal profession. -Andrew Straw
    • Disability Law and Disabled Students
      I applied for this position because the Law School has not made disabled students a priority. There was just one accommodation link on the School's webpage, and it was broken when I applied 6 weeks ago and as of right now it is still broken. The Law School lists how many women and minority students are in each class, but there is no mention of disability. There are no student groups for students with a disability, and only one class on this topic (the clinic). I applied because Indiana--as so many places around the country--has problems with disability rights in the legal profession. For instance, the Board of Law Examiners discriminates against those who have a mental disability. Even the federal courthouse in South Bend has no handicapped parking. It is 2013. Why is this so? I submit that it is so because each passing class of law students that is selected without an emphasis on encouraging disabled students is a class that sees disabilities as something to hide and be ashamed of. Disabilities are things that get punished in lawyers, weaknesses that are not rewarded in a very competitive profession. That's not how it should be, and not how it has to be. Indiana has had judges commit suicide, and this happens because our legal system discourages talking about mental illness. Instead, it is punished, because if you are identified as having an affective disorder, the Supreme Court can remove you. I hope the next dean at least sees fit to ensure the accommodations link gets fixed. It would be nice if the Law School started taking disabilities and disability rights seriously, started welcoming and inviting disabled law students. It would be nice if we had faculty teaching disability rights as civil and human rights, like other law schools do. Soon the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will be ratified by the Senate. 138 nations have ratified already. Disabled people wait for the USA to do the right thing. How will the Law School celebrate when it is so far behind? I would have enjoyed providing leadership in this area. I was physically disabled driving to work to the Indiana Supreme Court from Bloomington. I was discriminated against due my mental illness by the Board of Law Examiners. I hope that the new dean will work to ensure that disabled people in Indiana start being welcomed into the profession. Andrew Straw, '97 Founder, Disability Party of the United States http://www.facebook.com/DisabilityParty andrew@andrewstraw.com

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    1. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

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