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IU Maurer law professor Craig Bradley dies

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Craig Bradley, a longtime professor at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington, died Wednesday. He was 67.

The school announced Bradley’s death on its website, where a memorial has been established for those who wish to leave a remembrance. According to the school, Bradley, the Robert A. Lucas Chair of Law, served on the faculty for more than 30 years and was a respected scholar in criminal law and procedure as well as the death penalty.

“For more than 30 years, Craig Bradley was an indispensable part of the Maurer School of Law community,” said Hannah Buxbaum, interim dean. “He was an outstanding scholar, teacher, colleague, and friend, and he will be greatly missed.”

Several of the comments left on the Maurer website recalled Bradley’s sense of humor and skillful teaching. Former students described him as an “inspiration,” “brilliant thinker,” “great professor” and a “gentleman.”

Bradley clerked for William Rehnquist at U.S. Supreme Court before he became Chief Justice. He also served as an assistant U.S. Attorney in Washington, D.C.

Richard Garnett, professor of law and concurrent professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, clerked for then Chief Justice Rehnquist in the mid-1990s and met Bradley at that time. As Garnett transitioned into academia, Bradley kindly mentored him and also asked for Garnett’s contribution to a book he was editing about Rehnquist’s jurisprudential legacy.

“Whenever our paths crossed, he was friendly and encouraging,” Garnett said. “It meant a lot to me – as a relatively junior law teacher and legal scholar – to get his advice and encouragement.”

Sitting in four of Bradley’s criminal law classes, David Francisco remembered the stories and experiences the professor shared. Oftentimes, Bradley knew some of the participants or had some additional background information about the cases the class was reading.

“He had a dynamic presentation,” Francisco said, noting he expected the students to be prepared for class and made those who weren’t uncomfortable. “He just made it come alive.”

Francisco, now a deputy prosecutor in Elkhart County, credited Bradley with changing his focus on business law and inspiring him to pursue a career in criminal law. Bradley’s classes, Francisco said, prepared the students to expect the unexpected.

A member of the IU Maurer School of Law Class of 2005, Francisco pointed out that in addition to Bradley’s passing, the school also lost a popular faculty member, associate dean Leonard Fromm, in February.

“It unfortunate for the incoming students they will not get to meet two exceptional legends at Bloomington,” Francisco said. “Although, knowing the school and knowing the leadership, there are plenty of other legends and legends-to-be that they will get to learn from.”

According to information from the Bloomington Herald-Times, a memorial service for Bradley is planned at a later date. Allen Funeral Home and Crematory in Bloomington is handling arrangements.

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  • Memorial
    A Memorial Tribute to Craig will be held at the Maurer School of Law on November 15th at 5 p.m.

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