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Jefferson courts relocate, salvage documents

Jennifer Nelson
January 1, 2009
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The Jefferson Superior and Circuit courts have relocated in Madison and are working to get their offices up and running to handle emergency matters. The courts were forced out of the Jefferson County Courthouse after a fire May 20.

Circuit Court has moved to the Venture Out business center at 875 Industrial Dr. on the hill in Madison. Circuit Judge Ted Todd said the court is still trying to set up and is using folding tables and chairs until they can order furniture.

Superior Court is now at the former law offices of Superior Judge Alison Frazier at 217 E. Second St. Superior Court is using borrowed items until the court can get new equipment ordered; phone lines should be connected in the next few days, said Superior Court reporter Narda Kidwell.

Both courts are trying to salvage as many documents as they can. The fire didn't destroy the building below the roof and the dome that houses the court clock and bell, but part of the roof caved in over Circuit Court, which was located on the third floor, Judge Todd said. Superior Court didn't suffer as much damage because it was located on the second floor.

A company has taken the accessible documents from the courts and clerk's office, which was on the second floor, and will freeze dry the wet documents to restore them. Judge Todd said there are a lot of records still in the Circuit Court's offices. Because of the roof collapse, he said they can't go in and recover the files and records on desks and in filing cabinets until the bell tower is removed.

"I was up there for a brief time, as was a court reporter," Judge Todd said. "We know visually what it's like. The files in the filing cabinets should be able to be recaptured once we can get up there."

They hope to get those records out this week, but it depends on how much progress has been done in removing the dome.

The courthouse backup system for computers and scanned documents is up to date through the day of the fire, Judge Todd said, and the courts should be able to reconstruct any missing documents thanks to Chronological Case Summaries and files from attorneys.

Because the courts are under the emergency-relief order granted by the Indiana Supreme Court May 21, they are handling only emergency matters at the county jail

 

 Jefferson County Courthouse. Photo by Rebecca Collier because the courts need to get equipment for recording and establish a more systematic way for new matters to be filed, Judge Todd said. Judge Frazier and Judge Todd are splitting the emergency custody, CHINS, juvenile, criminal, and protective-order matters.

Both Judge Todd and Kidwell noted how the legal community and general community has helped by donating law books, legal pads, and office equipment for use until the courts can order their own.

"Everyone's been great. There's a lot of support and everybody's helped us make sure we have the things we need," the judge said.

There's no time frame for how long the courts will be in their temporary locations, but Judge Todd hopes to be set up to handle other hearings before the noon June 5 deadline in the emergency-relief order.
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  1. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  2. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  3. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

  4. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  5. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

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