ILNews

Judge orders law firms to repay city $453,282

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

A Merrillville attorney and three law firms must repay East Chicago a total $453,282 in legal fees they collected for defending former city officials in the Sidewalk Six scandal.

Lake Superior Judge John Pera on Wednesday issued a 10-page order in the case City of East Chicago and George Pabey v. Edwardo Maldonado, et al., No. 45D10-0503-PL-32, ruling that former city controller Edwardo Maldonado illegally paid four law firms that amount in 2004 for defending him and former city councilmen Frank Kollintzas and Joe De La Cruz against federal public corruption charges.

The judge ordered Merrillville practitioner Kevin Milner to repay $47,250; Valparaiso law firm Tsoutsouris & Bertig to repay $51,444; and Chicago law firms Cotsirilos Tighe & Streicker, and Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw to repay $63,923 and $290,665 respectively.

The foundation of this case filed five years ago dates back to 1999, when city officials illegally spent $25.5 million in public funds to repave sidewalks, curbs, and make other improvements in exchange for re-election votes favoring former East Chicago Mayor Robert Pastrick and his allies. That led to the federal criminal convictions of Maldonado, Kollintzas, and De La Cruz in 2004 for misappropriating public money, as well as a civil racketeering suit that resulted in a $108 million judgment against Pastrick and two supporters.

Following the verdict, Maldonado pleaded guilty in federal court that making the payments was a crime and he was ordered to pay $453,282 in restitution; but that money hasn’t been collected as he remains incarcerated until 2014. Kollintzas disappeared prior to his sentencing in 2005 and is believed to be in Greece, while De La Cruz has only recently been released from prison.

On this case, Judge Pera noted that the issue before him was: “Given the clear illegality of the payments, is it appropriate to require those receiving them to give the money back to the City? The city is silent as to any duty of attorneys retained by accused officials to return fees that the city may have paid, and is further silent as to any recourse the City might have against attorneys in such event.”

The judge noted that the Indiana General Assembly hasn’t specifically spoken on this issue, but that he can turn to common law for guidance. He relied on the current draft of the Restatement (Third) of Restitution, as well as caselaw dating back more than a century from inside and outside Indiana.

But Judge Pera wrote that the lawyers who accepted the money from Maldonado “almost before the ink was dry on a U.S. District Court jury verdict” should have realized a city ordinance forbid the payments once the officials were convicted of wrongdoing.

“Their suspicion should have been excited, by appearance and circumstances, that Maldonado was committing a breach of his fiduciary duty as agent for the City,” Judge Pera wrote. “Despite this knowledge, they accepted the payments when they should have refused them. Having notice of the circumstances in which the payments were made, the Attorney Defendants cannot claim protection as innocent third-party creditors.”
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I am compelled to announce that I am not posting under any Smith monikers here. That said, the post below does have a certain ring to it that sounds familiar to me: http://www.catholicnewworld.com/cnwonline/2014/0907/cardinal.aspx

  2. As an adoptive parent, I have to say this situation was as shameful as it gets. While the state government opens its wallet to the Simons and their friends, it denied payments to the most vulnerable in our state. Thanks Mitch!

  3. We as lawyers who have given up the range of First amendment freedom that other people possess, so that we can have a license to practice in the courts of the state and make gobs of money, that we agree to combat the hateful and bigoted discrimination enshrined in the law by democratic majorities, that Law Lord Posner has graciously explained for us....... We must now unhesitatingly condemn the sincerely held religious beliefs of religiously observant Catholics, Muslims, Christians, and Jewish persons alike who yet adhere to Scriptural exhortations concerning sodomites and catamites..... No tolerance will be extended to intolerance, and we must hate the haters most zealously! And in our public explanations of this constitutional garbledygook, when doing the balancing act, we must remember that the state always pushes its finger down on the individualism side of the scale at every turn and at every juncture no matter what the cost to society.....to elevate the values of a minority over the values of the majority is now the defining feature of American "Democracy..." we must remember our role in tricking Americans to think that this is desirable in spite of their own democratically expressed values being trashed. As a secular republic the United States might as well be officially atheist, religious people are now all bigots and will soon be treated with the same contempt that kluckers were in recent times..... The most important thing is that any source of moral authority besides the state be absolutely crushed.

  4. In my recent article in Indiana Lawyer, I noted that grass roots marketing -- reaching out and touching people -- is still one of the best forms of advertising today. It's often forgotten in the midst of all of today's "newer wave" marketing techniques. Shaking hands and kissing babies is what politicians have done for year and it still works. These are perfect examples of building goodwill. Kudos to these firms. Make "grass roots" an essential part of your marketing plan. Jon Quick QPRmarketing.com

  5. Hi, Who can I speak to regarding advertising today? Thanks, Gary

ADVERTISEMENT