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Judges address first impression issue on attorney fees

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For the first time, the Indiana Court of Appeals addressed a contract that included a provision stating the signee is responsible for 40 percent in attorney fees if a hospital had to initiate collection efforts to recover amounts owed.

Mark French admitted his child to Harsha Behavioral Center in Terre Haute. He signed a contract regarding financial responsibility which included the provision “I also acknowledge that I am responsible for reasonable interest, collection fees, attorney fees of the greater of a) forty (40%) or b) $300.00 of the outstanding balance, and/or court costs incurred in connection with any attempt to collect amounts I may owe.”

Harsha billed French for $8,500 in of services, which he never paid. The amount was assigned to Corvee Inc., a collection agency. The trial court entered a default judgment against French awarding the full outstanding balance, but only awarded Corvee $1,000 in attorney fees instead of the $3,400 it was asking for. The amount it wanted was 40 percent of the $8,500.

Corvee filed a motion to correct error, which the trial court denied.

“There is no dispute here that the contract unambiguously required French to pay that amount, designated as attorney fees. The issue is whether that provision is enforceable,” wrote Judge Michael Barnes in Corvee, Inc. v. Mark French, No. 84A04-1010-CC-696. “Indiana appellate courts have not yet had the occasion to address an attorney fees provision identical to this one.”

The judges concluded that the attorney-fees provision in the contract is in the nature of a liquidated damages provision. They also found it to be unnecessary to transform the standard attorney-fees provision in a contract into a liquidated-damages provision that may or may not have any correlation to the attorney fees actually incurred.

Citing Smith v. Kendall, 477 N.E.2d 953 (Ind. Ct. App. 1985), the judges found there was no evidence that Corvee actually incurred $3,400 in attorney fees in attempting to collect the debt from French.

“To allow Corvee to recover that amount in the absence of such evidence gives rise to the possibility that it will enjoy a windfall at French’s expense, or that it will recover more from French than the outstanding account balance and the necessary costs Corvee actually incurred in collecting it,” wrote Judge Barnes. “Collection actions should permit creditors to recover that to which they are rightfully entitled to make themselves whole, and no more.”

The judges found no basis to second-guess the trial court’s calculations that $1,000 would actually compensate Corvee for its attorney fees.

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  • SAJ
    The next time that one of us laments the fact that our profession is no longer admired by the public, despite the large number of good deeds done by the majority, we can point to the greed and stupidity exhibited by the small minority. And spring-boarding that into a reported opinion? Priceless.

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  1. I just wanted to point out that Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner, Senator Feinstein, former Senate majority leader Bill Frist, and former attorney general John Ashcroft are responsible for this rubbish. We need to keep a eye on these corrupt, arrogant, and incompetent fools.

  2. Well I guess our politicians have decided to give these idiot federal prosecutors unlimited power. Now if I guy bounces a fifty-dollar check, the U.S. attorney can intentionally wait for twenty-five years or so and have the check swabbed for DNA and file charges. These power hungry federal prosecutors now have unlimited power to mess with people. we can thank Wisconsin's Jim Sensenbrenner and Diane Feinstein, John Achcroft and Bill Frist for this one. Way to go, idiots.

  3. I wonder if the USSR had electronic voting machines that changed the ballot after it was cast? Oh well, at least we have a free media serving as vicious watchdog and exposing all of the rot in the system! (Insert rimshot)

  4. Jose, you are assuming those in power do not wish to be totalitarian. My experience has convinced me otherwise. Constitutionalists are nearly as rare as hens teeth among the powerbrokers "managing" us for The Glorious State. Oh, and your point is dead on, el correcta mundo. Keep the Founders’ (1791 & 1851) vision alive, my friend, even if most all others, and especially the ruling junta, chase only power and money (i.e. mammon)

  5. Hypocrisy in high places, absolute immunity handed out like Halloween treats (it is the stuff of which tyranny is made) and the belief that government agents are above the constitutions and cannot be held responsible for mere citizen is killing, perhaps has killed, The Republic. And yet those same power drunk statists just reel on down the hallway toward bureaucratic fascism.

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