ILNews

Judges disagree on attorney fee provision

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

A legal battle that was once about Indiana's requirements to obtain a driver's license or state identification turned into a tug-of-war appeal about attorney fees.

Both times, three illegal immigrants won their case before the Indiana Court of Appeals.

In Joel Silverman, in his official capacity as Commissioner of the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles v. Miguel Villegas, Betty Doe, Mary Smith, et al., No. 49A02-0708-CV-754, the court decided 2-1 today that plaintiffs are prevailing parties for succeeding on a state statutory claim that is pendent to a substantial federal constitutional claim arising from the same case.

The ruling follows a previous appellate court decision in August 2005 first going in the plaintiffs' favor. Following a 2002 rule change about what documents were required to get an ID, the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana sued on procedural and constitutional grounds to have the rule thrown out. The appellate court found the rule wasn't properly enacted and didn't address the larger constitutional issues, though the rule was ultimately adopted properly in early 2006.

After the first win, the plaintiffs filed a motion to enter judgment in their favor and then to secure attorney fees and costs as the prevailing party pursuant to 42 U.S. Code 1988 (Section 1988). The trial court granted that motion and ordered $112,468 be paid, but the Attorney General's office appealed and argued the plaintiffs hadn't suffered any injury through federal claims and the provision didn't apply.

The appellate panel affirmed the lower decision, finding that the court left the federal claim undecided three years ago and that the successful state law claim entitled them to "prevailing party" status for purposes of the attorney fee argument because it was part of the same "common nucleus of operative fact."

But Chief Judge John Baker disagreed, writing that the majority's opinion goes against the rationale of the attorney fee provision in the U.S. Code. He wrote the parties shouldn't be considered prevailing parties because they didn't succeed on the federal claims and the rule-making grounds the plaintiffs did succeed on weren't related to the underlying issues they'd sued over.

"The majority seemingly takes the view that a claimant need only advance 'some' type of constitutional claim and succeed on a non-related state claim to become entitled to attorneys' fees. ... To me, such a notion contradicts the spirit of the Section 1988 provisions," the chief judge wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  2. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  3. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  4. Different rules for different folks....

  5. I would strongly suggest anyone seeking mediation check the experience of the mediator. There are retired judges who decide to become mediators. Their training and experience is in making rulings which is not the point of mediation.

ADVERTISEMENT