Bar Associations/Foundations

IndyBar: Breakfast with the Bar Serves up ‘Cold Pizza’ Tips

April 20, 2016
From IndyBar
Breakfast with the Bar is a monthly IndyBar Law Student Division event held throughout the academic year where law students mingle with attorneys in a small group setting. Each event features a different practice area or type. While Breakfast with the Bar will take a break for the summer, keep an eye out for it to start back up in September, and enjoy a law student’s recap of the most recent session!
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Wright: In Full Swing for Spring: Get Involved with the YLD!

April 20, 2016
From IndyBar
The Young Lawyers Division (YLD) had a very successful first quarter – thanks to our diligent board and dedicated membership. On behalf of the YLD, I am happy to report on the YLD’s accomplishments to date, as well as our upcoming objectives next quarter.
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IndyBar: Nominations Now Open for IndyBar Paralegal of the Year Award

April 20, 2016
From IndyBar
Assistance from qualified and competent paralegals is crucial to the success of many attorneys. This year, make sure to recognize the important paralegal in your life by submitting a Paralegal of the Year Award nomination.
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IndyBar: Have you heard the news? IndyBar Launches Listservs for Sections and Divisions

April 20, 2016
From IndyBar
Some of the most valuable tips and resources come not from a scholarly journal or a classroom—they come from a productive discussion with colleagues.
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IndyBar: Ask a Lawyer - More than 560 people helped!

April 20, 2016
From IndyBar
Read more about the recent Ask a Lawyer event.
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Pro Bono: One Attorney, One Big Impact

April 6, 2016
Kris Kazmierczak
Darrell has been a solo practitioner for the last 23 years, but he still dedicates many hours each year to pro bono work.
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IBF launches new donor society

April 6, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indiana Bar Foundation hopes its new Keystone Society will bring in unrestricted donor dollars.
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Tangling with tech companies’ move into legal services

March 23, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
A recent American Bar Association resolution on regulating non-traditional legal services providers coupled with a pilot project with Rocket Lawyer has stirred opposition among bar associations.
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Art project seeks images of Indiana’s courthouses

March 23, 2016
Scott Roberts
A project by the Indiana State Bar Association and currently on display at Conner Prairie seeks to highlight the beauty of Indiana’s courthouses, which are not only the centers of law, but focal pieces for small town centers.
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DTCI: Senate obstruction on appointments harms entire judiciary

March 23, 2016
From DTCI
Since the Republicans took control of the Senate after the 2014 elections, the Obama administration has made only one judicial appointment as Republican senators have refused to sign off ahead of time on nominees for judgeships in their states. This is in stark contrast to President Obama’s predecessors since Ronald Reagan who also faced a Senate controlled by the opposing party, yet appointed between 10-18 appellate judges in their last two years in office.
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IndyBar: Delivering Peace of Mind: Volunteer for Low Asset Wills Workshops

March 23, 2016
From IndyBar
For years, IndyBar attorneys have helped community members living in poverty to safeguard their futures through the Low Asset Wills Program.
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Moberly: If At First You Don’t Succeed, Try, Try Again (and Again, and Again…)

March 23, 2016
Robyn Moberly
It’s no secret that the IndyBar has supported merit selection for decades. It’s also no secret that view is not held by everyone. I sincerely respect our members who would prefer an open partisan election of our judges in Marion County. Mostly that view is held as a result of a reverence for voting rights, which I hope we all share.
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IndyBar Frontlines - 3/23/16

March 23, 2016
From IndyBar
Read news from around the IndyBar!
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IndyBar: Volunteer Opportunity: Help Out at Spring Mediation Day

March 23, 2016
From IndyBar
The IndyBar ADR Section Executive Committee is pleased to announce that we are hosting our second annual Spring Paternity Court Mediation Day.
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Evansville Bar Association honors firm, professionals at luncheon

March 18, 2016
IL Staff
The Evansville Bar Association and Volunteer Lawyer Program of SW Indiana recognized pro bono work, legal secretaries and paralegals during their annual joint awards luncheon Wednesday.
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Park Tudor scandal reignites debate about lawyers reporting child abuse

March 9, 2016
Dave Stafford
Charges that former Park Tudor basketball coach and teacher Kyle Cox attempted to coerce and entice a 15-year-old student into a sexual relationship — and an attorney’s alleged actions after learning of the accusations — have refocused attention on a 2015 advisory ethics opinion that largely exempts lawyers from a law that requires reporting suspected child abuse.
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IndyBar: Meet the IndyBar Board of Directors

March 9, 2016
From IndyBar
They’re more than just board members! The 33 members of the Indianapolis Bar Association Board of Directors represent a rainbow of practice areas and types, backgrounds, passions and much more. Take a minute to learn more about your IndyBar leaders in this regular feature to follow throughout 2016.
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IndyBar: Diversity Through Intention: Sign on as a Diversity Job Fair Interviewer or Sponsor Today

March 9, 2016
From IndyBar
Intentionality in seeking career opportunities helps propel progress. The legal profession is no exception.
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IndyBar: Build Your Bankruptcy Practice and Provide a Valuable Service at the Same Time!

March 9, 2016
From IndyBar
What if you could ease stress on the courts caused by pro se representation, build your practice and help a member of our community all at the same time? It’s possible through the newly formed Bankruptcy Modest Means Program!
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Moberly: Maintaining Control Amid Change

March 9, 2016
Robyn Moberly
The IndyBar has recognized that lawyers want to be in control of their memberships in ways they never could before.
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IndyBar Frontlines - 3/9/16

March 9, 2016
From IndyBar
Read the latest news from around the IndyBar.
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IndyBar: New Resource Available to Marion County Litigators

March 9, 2016
From IndyBar
IndyBar members will be walking into the courtroom with even more confidence, thanks to a recent resource compiled by the association’s Litigation Section.
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DTCI: Bridging the generational gap

March 9, 2016
From DTCI
The issue of “dealing with millennials” isn’t just a hot topic; it is a real issue facing the legal industry that not only warrants our collective attention, regardless of our age group, but also deserves an honest conversation.
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DTCI: March Membership Madness

March 9, 2016
From DTCI
Sure it’s madness, but DTCI is pulling out the stops to encourage current members to sponsor other defense attorneys as NEW DTCI members.
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DTCI: Oral argument: your brief’s critical supplement

March 9, 2016
From DTCI
United States Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist, considering the relationship between brief writing and oral argument, likened the former to a movie preview and the latter to the movie itself.
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  1. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) End of Year Report 2014. (page 13) Under the current system many local registering agencies are challenged just keeping up with registration paperwork. It takes an hour or more to process each registrant, the majority of whom are low risk offenders. As a result law enforcement cannot monitor higher risk offenders more intensively in the community due to the sheer numbers on the registry. Some of the consequences of lengthy and unnecessary registration requirements actually destabilize the life’s of registrants and those -such as families- whose lives are often substantially impacted. Such consequences are thought to raise levels of known risk factors while providing no discernible benefit in terms of community safety. The full report is available online at. http://www.casomb.org/index.cfm?pid=231 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) US Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs United States of America. The overall conclusion is that Megan’s law has had no demonstrated effect on sexual offenses in New Jersey, calling into question the justification for start-up and operational costs. Megan’s Law has had no effect on time to first rearrest for known sex offenders and has not reduced sexual reoffending. Neither has it had an impact on the type of sexual reoffense or first-time sexual offense. The study also found that the law had not reduced the number of victims of sexual offenses. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/app/publications/abstract.aspx? ID=247350 The University of Chicago Press for The Booth School of Business of the University of Chicago and The University of Chicago Law School Article DOI: 10.1086/658483 Conclusion. The data in these three data sets do not strongly support the effectiveness of sex offender registries. The national panel data do not show a significant decrease in the rate of rape or the arrest rate for sexual abuse after implementation of a registry via the Internet. The BJS data that tracked individual sex offenders after their release in 1994 did not show that registration had a significantly negative effect on recidivism. And the D.C. crime data do not show that knowing the location of sex offenders by census block can help protect the locations of sexual abuse. This pattern of noneffectiveness across the data sets does not support the conclusion that sex offender registries are successful in meeting their objectives of increasing public safety and lowering recidivism rates. The full report is available online at. http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/658483 These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of conclusions and reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. People, including the media and other organizations should not rely on and reiterate the statements and opinions of the legislators or other people as to the need for these laws because of the high recidivism rates and the high risk offenders pose to the public which simply is not true and is pure hyperbole and fiction. They should rely on facts and data collected and submitted in reports from the leading authorities and credible experts in the fields such as the following. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 0.8% (page 30) The full report is available online at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Research_Branch/Research_Documents/2014_Outcome_Evaluation_Report_7-6-2015.pdf California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) (page 38) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 1.8% The full report is available online at. http://www.google.com/url?sa= t&source=web&cd=1&ved= 0CCEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F% 2Fwww.cdcr.ca.gov%2FAdult_ Research_Branch%2FResearch_ documents%2FOutcome_ evaluation_Report_2013.pdf&ei= C9dSVePNF8HfoATX-IBo&usg=AFQjCNE9I6ueHz-o2mZUnuxLPTyiRdjDsQ Bureau of Justice Statistics 5 PERCENT OF SEX OFFENDERS REARRESTED FOR ANOTHER SEX CRIME WITHIN 3 YEARS OF PRISON RELEASE WASHINGTON, D.C. Within 3 years following their 1994 state prison release, 5.3 percent of sex offenders (men who had committed rape or sexual assault) were rearrested for another sex crime, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. The full report is available online at. http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/rsorp94pr.cfm Document title; A Model of Static and Dynamic Sex Offender Risk Assessment Author: Robert J. McGrath, Michael P. Lasher, Georgia F. Cumming Document No.: 236217 Date Received: October 2011 Award Number: 2008-DD-BX-0013 Findings: Study of 759 adult male offenders under community supervision Re-arrest rate: 4.6% after 3-year follow-up The sexual re-offense rates for the 746 released in 2005 are much lower than what many in the public have been led to expect or believe. These low re-offense rates appear to contradict a conventional wisdom that sex offenders have very high sexual re-offense rates. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/236217.pdf Document Title: SEX OFFENDER SENTENCING IN WASHINGTON STATE: RECIDIVISM RATES BY: Washington State Institute For Public Policy. A study of 4,091 sex offenders either released from prison or community supervision form 1994 to 1998 and examined for 5 years Findings: Sex Crime Recidivism Rate: 2.7% Link to Report: http://www.oncefallen.com/files/Washington_SO_Recid_2005.pdf Document Title: Indiana’s Recidivism Rates Decline for Third Consecutive Year BY: Indiana Department of Correction 2009. The recidivism rate for sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05%, one of the lowest in the nation. In a time when sex offenders continue to face additional post-release requirements that often result in their return to prison for violating technical rules such as registration and residency restrictions, the instances of sex offenders returning to prison due to the commitment of a new sex crime is extremely low. Findings: sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05% Link to Report: http://www.in.gov/idoc/files/RecidivismRelease.pdf Once again, These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. No one can doubt that child sexual abuse is traumatic and devastating. The question is not whether the state has an interest in preventing such harm, but whether current laws are effective in doing so. Megan’s law is a failure and is destroying families and their children’s lives and is costing tax payers millions upon millions of dollars. The following is just one example of the estimated cost just to implement SORNA which many states refused to do. From Justice Policy Institute. Estimated cost to implement SORNA Here are some of the estimates made in 2009 expressed in 2014 current dollars: California, $66M; Florida, $34M; Illinois, $24M; New York, $35M; Pennsylvania, $22M; Texas, $44M. In 2014 dollars, Virginia’s estimate for implementation was $14M, and the annual operating cost after that would be $10M. For the US, the total is $547M. That’s over half a billion dollars – every year – for something that doesn’t work. http://www.justicepolicy.org/images/upload/08-08_FAC_SORNACosts_JJ.pdf. Attempting to use under-reporting to justify the existence of the registry is another myth, or a lie. This is another form of misinformation perpetrated by those who either have a fiduciary interest in continuing the unconstitutional treatment of a disfavored group or are seeking to justify their need for punishment for people who have already paid for their crime by loss of their freedom through incarceration and are now attempting to reenter society as honest citizens. When this information is placed into the public’s attention by naive media then you have to wonder if the media also falls into one of these two groups that are not truly interested in reporting the truth. Both of these groups of people that have that type of mentality can be classified as vigilantes, bullies, or sociopaths, and are responsible for the destruction of our constitutional values and the erosion of personal freedoms in this country. I think the media or other organizations need to do a in depth investigation into the false assumptions and false data that has been used to further these laws and to research all the collateral damages being caused by these laws and the unconstitutional injustices that are occurring across the country. They should include these injustices in their report so the public can be better informed on what is truly happening in this country on this subject. Thank you for your time.

  2. Freedom as granted in the Constitution cannot be summarily disallowed without Due Process. Unable to to to the gym, church, bowling alley? What is this 1984 level nonsense? Congrats to Brian for having the courage to say that this was enough! and Congrats to the ACLU on the win!

  3. America's hyper-phobia about convicted sex offenders must end! Politicians must stop pandering to knee-jerk public hysteria. And the public needs to learn the facts. Research by the California Sex Offender Management Board as shown a recidivism rate for convicted sex offenders of less than 1%. Less than 1%! Furthermore, research shows that by year 17 after their conviction, a convicted sex offender is no more likely to commit a new sex offense than any other member of the public. Put away your torches and pitchforks. Get the facts. Stop hysteria.

  4. He was convicted 23 years ago. How old was he then? He probably was a juvenile. People do stupid things, especially before their brain is fully developed. Why are we continuing to punish him in 2016? If he hasn't re-offended by now, it's very, very unlikely he ever will. He paid for his mistake sufficiently. Let him live his life in peace.

  5. This year, Notre Dame actually enrolled an equal amount of male and female students.

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