Bloomington

Maurer law school names interim dean

December 13, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana University board of trustees appointed Hannah L. Buxbaum as acting dean of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, effective Feb. 1. Buxbaum will serve as dean while the current dean, Lauren Robel, is interim provost for the school’s Bloomington campus.
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Shepard to speak at IU commencement

December 9, 2011
IL Staff
On the heels of the announcement that Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard is retiring from the Indiana Supreme Court, Indiana University announced this week that the justice will address graduates at the Bloomington campus’ winter commencement Dec. 17.
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Robel named interim provost at IU Bloomington

December 7, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Indiana University Maurer School of Law Dean Lauren Robel has been named interim provost for IU’s Bloomington campus. She’s filling the role temporarily until a replacement can be found for Karen Hanson, who is leaving in January to become senior vice president and provost at the University of Minnesota.
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Incoming DTCI president sets priorities for new year

December 7, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Civility and clarifying priorities are among Lonnie D. Johnson's key initiatives for 2012.
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Symposium marks anniversary of Nunn-Lugar Act

November 4, 2011
IL Staff
Indiana University will mark the 20th anniversary of the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program with a symposium Nov. 11 on its Bloomington campus.
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Indiana University to host 9/11 Commission members

August 30, 2011
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law will host a talk by former U.S. Rep. Lee H. Hamilton, the past vice chairman of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks on the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission.
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CLEAR center receives Regenstrief grant

August 12, 2011
IL Staff
The Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information at Indiana University Maurer School of Law has received a $425,000 grant from the Regenstrief Foundation Inc., which will be used to make renovations and add amenities to its office space.
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Experts to discuss judicial selection at IU Maurer

April 19, 2011
IL Staff
Four nationally known experts on judicial selection will participate in a panel discussion April 21 at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in the Moot Court Room.
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DNA expert to discuss wrongful convictions

April 8, 2011
IL Staff
A forensic geneticist who has worked on the exonerations of seven people will visit Indiana University April 15 to give a public lecture on how DNA is used to free people who have been wrongfully convicted and how informatics is being misused to pervert justice.
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Maurer School of Law to present symposium on globalization and migration

March 31, 2011
IL Staff
International scholars will meet at Indiana University in April to discuss the relationships between globalization and migration.
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Defense attorney's arranged drug buy illegal

February 28, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals rejected a Bloomington attorney’s argument that his arrangement of a drug buy in an attempt to discredit a state’s witness against his client wasn’t a criminal offense because he’s “on the same legal footing” as prosecutors or police in planning controlled buys.
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Judges reverse summary judgment for agent, partner

February 21, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
A case involving a Bloomington real estate transaction required the Indiana Court of Appeals to decipher the statutes in question without the aid of previous interpretations because of a lack of previous caselaw interpreting them.
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SCOTUS history on display

January 19, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
Attorneys and history buffs alike may want to consider a detour to the law library at Indiana University Maurer School of Law next time they are in or near Bloomington.
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FBI shares hate crime statistics

January 5, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
In late September 2010, as part of the FBI Citizen’s Academy in Indianapolis, agents passed around photos from a cross burning that took place four years earlier in Muncie.
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Encouraging diversity at law schools

December 8, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
When asked if diversity played a role in their decisions on where to attend law school, a handful of minority law students in Indiana said while it wasn’t the biggest or only factor, it often was a consideration.
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Johnsen speaks publicly for first time in 2 years

November 24, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Two years ago this month, an Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor was named to the transition team of President Barack Obama, not quite knowing where that experience would lead.
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Institution's lawyer finds client a hybrid

September 1, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Kiply Drew knows her job as an in-house counsel for the one of the country’s top 100 universities means every day is different.
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COA addresses inverse condemnation issues

August 20, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
Inverse condemnation was the issue of the day for two Indiana Court of Appeals panels, with one case raising issues regarding fraudulent concealment and the statute of limitations.
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Patient wins case following disclosure of HIV status

July 21, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Considering how much information is out there on just about every individual – a simple Google search can prove that – it’s difficult to say what is or isn’t private anymore.
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Auction benefits domestic violence victims

February 9, 2010
IL Staff
The Women's Law Caucus at Indiana University Maurer School of Law - Bloomington has raised $11,000 for two local organizations working with victims of domestic violence.
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State of Judiciary to air on PBS

January 22, 2010
IL Staff
For those who weren't able to catch Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard's State of the Judiciary in person or want to see it again, Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations around the state will air the speech next week.
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Senate hearing Wednesday for nominated lawyer

July 28, 2009
IL Staff
The U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works will hold a full hearing at 10 a.m. Wednesday on the nomination of Indianapolis attorney John R. Fernandez to be Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development in the U.S. Department of Commerce.
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President Obama taps Indianapolis attorney

July 7, 2009
Michael Hoskins
An Indianapolis attorney is President Barack Obama's newest nomination for a key administration post within the Department of Commerce.
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Phone-a-thon helps 2,000 homeowners

July 2, 2009
Rebecca Berfanger
A phone-a-thon June 30 helped 2,000 Indiana homeowners by giving them a chance to get more information if they were afraid of facing foreclosure or already knew their home was or would likely go into foreclosure.
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Lecture to focus on mortgage crisis' impact

April 6, 2009
IL Staff
A University of Cambridge legal scholar will offer his thoughts on the U.S. mortgage crisis during the 2009 Snyder Lecture at Indiana University Maurer School of Law  Tuesday.
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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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