Carmel

Indianapolis tries to halt Carmel’s 96th Street roundabout

June 21, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Four planned roundabouts on 96th Street may have hit a roadblock with the city of Indianapolis asking a court to stop the city of Carmel from moving forward with the project.
More

Carmel-based company wins patent case at US Supreme Court

May 22, 2017
 Associated Press,  Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court is making it easier for companies to defend themselves against patent infringement lawsuits.
More

Indiana students fight to display pro-abortion rights sign

May 3, 2017
 Associated Press
Students at a suburban Indiana high school who were told they couldn't hang a pro-abortion rights sign in the cafeteria are turning to the courts, arguing that another student group was allowed to put up an anti-abortion sign last year.
More

Carmel attorney reaches his goals with top-rated podcast

April 5, 2017
Olivia Covington
Since the launch of his franchise-law focused podcast, attorney Josh Brown has added 22 new clients thanks to the publicity the podcast provides.
More

US Supreme Court to hear appeal by Carmel firm over IP lawsuits

December 15, 2016
 Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to consider putting sharp new limits on where patent-infringement lawsuits can be filed, accepting a case that may undercut patent owners’ ability to channel cases to favorable courts.
More

4 Indiana cities seek dismissal of LGBT protections suit

December 8, 2016
 Associated Press, IL Staff
Four Indiana cities have asked the Indiana Court of Appeals to overrule a judge’s ruling allowing conservative groups to go ahead with a lawsuit challenging anti-discrimination ordinances.
More

Lawsuit challenging cities' human rights ordinances stays in court

November 17, 2016
Olivia Covington
A Hamilton County judge has ruled that a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of human rights ordinances in four Indiana cities can continue, despite the cities’ arguments that there was no legal standing to bring the suit.
More

3 conservative groups challenge RFRA ‘fix,’ human rights ordinances

November 16, 2016
Olivia Covington
After a nearly 4½-hour hearing during which they argued the constitutionality of their local human rights ordinances prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, four Indiana cities are waiting to learn if a Hamilton Superior Court judge will dismiss a suit challenging the ordinances.
More

Plaintiffs in Carmel class-action traffic lawsuit file appeal

November 7, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
The plaintiffs in a federal class-action lawsuit filed against the city of Carmel for its enforcement of a local traffic ordinance are appealing the dismissal of the case in early October.
More

Cities argue for dismissal of suit against human rights ordinances

November 3, 2016
Olivia Covington
During a nearly 4 ½-hour hearing in Hamilton Superior Court Wednesday, attorneys for the cities of Carmel, Indianapolis, Bloomington and Columbus argued before Judge Steven Nation that the lawsuit brought against their human rights ordinances should be dismissed because the case is not ripe for judgment and because the plaintiffs have no legal standing to bring the action.
More

4 Indiana cities ask judge to dismiss LGBT protections suit

November 1, 2016
 Associated Press
Bloomington and three other Indiana cities have asked a Hamilton County judge to dismiss a lawsuit challenging local protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
More

Pittman family dispute escalates with new lawsuit

October 21, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
An ongoing family dispute could cause some of the companies related to a retail real estate development in Carmel to be dissolved.
More

Federal judge dismisses class-action lawsuit against Carmel

October 7, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
A U.S. district court judge has dismissed a federal class-action lawsuit filed against the city of Carmel for its enforcement of a local traffic ordinance.
More

Court rules in favor of Carmel in Home Place annexation case

June 22, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
A judge has ruled that Carmel’s attempted annexation of a small area in Clay Township known as Home Place should be allowed to move forward.
More

Carmel facing another federal lawsuit for its traffic ordinance

June 7, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
Jason Maraman, who recently won a state lawsuit appealing his traffic ticket from Carmel, filed a new complaint in federal court on Friday. He is accusing the Carmel police officer who pulled him over of giving false testimony and targeting his vehicle for having an out-of-county license plate.
More

Lawyers scatter after century-old Carmel firm closes

May 27, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
A 100-year-old law firm in Hamilton County has dissolved, and a majority of its attorneys have launched new practices.
More

Carmel faces federal class-action lawsuit over traffic law

January 12, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
The city of Carmel is facing a class-action lawsuit in federal court for its enforcement of a local traffic ordinance a state appeals court has already struck down.
More

Councilors question Carmel attorney's 2-week paid leave, then hefty raise

November 18, 2015
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
After going on paid administrative leave this fall, Carmel City Attorney Dough Haney received a 23 percent raise that will take effect in 2016.
More

LGBT anti-discrimination ordinance moves forward in Carmel

October 2, 2015
 Associated Press
A proposal that would ban discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity is set to go before the full Carmel City Council after being moved forward by a committee.
More

Carmel tables sexual-orientation ordinance

September 18, 2015
 Associated Press
A proposal to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity has been tabled by city officials in the Indianapolis suburb of Carmel.
More

Palladium contractors to pay $5.3M to settle suit

November 20, 2014
Indianapolis Business Journal, Andrea Muirragui Davis
The Carmel Redevelopment Commission is headed for a $5.3 million payday after agreeing to settle a lawsuit over defects found in the structural steel web supporting the Palladium’s distinctive domed roof.
More

Settlement pending in multimillion-dollar Palladium litigation

November 19, 2014
Indianapolis Business Journal, Andrea Muirragui Davis
The defendants in a multimillion-dollar legal dispute over construction defects at Carmel’s tony Palladium concert hall have agreed to settle the dispute, court records show.
More

COA reverses ruling against Carmel in building dispute

July 25, 2014
Dave Stafford
A Carmel couple who successfully sued the city that at first permitted construction of an accessory building that neighbors later complained was taller than zoning codes allowed lost Friday at the Indiana Court of Appeals.
More

Defendant in trial over concert hall defects tries to halt repairs

June 7, 2013
Andrea Muirragui Davis
Attorneys for the Michigan contractor being sued over construction defects at Carmel’s Palladium concert hall have asked a Hamilton County court to halt repair work immediately to preserve evidence in the case.
More

ITT agrees to pay Sallie Mae $46M to settle suit

January 8, 2013
Scott Olson
Carmel-based ITT Educational Services Inc., one of the largest operators of for-profit colleges in the nation, has agreed to pay Sallie Mae Corp. $46 million to settle litigation related to a loan agreement between the two parties.
More
Page  1 2 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

ADVERTISEMENT