Copyright

Jury finds Led Zeppelin did not steal riff for 'Stairway'

June 23, 2016
 Associated Press
Led Zeppelin did not steal a riff from an obscure 1960s instrumental tune to use for the introduction of its classic rock anthem "Stairway to Heaven," a federal court jury decided Thursday.
More

Jury gets peek at making of Led Zeppelin's epic 'Stairway'

June 22, 2016
 Associated Press
Rock 'n' roll history played out Tuesday in a Los Angeles courtroom as vintage recordings of Led Zeppelin working on the song that became the epic "Stairway to Heaven" were played and the songwriters discussed its craft.
More

Led Zeppelin lawyers ask judge to toss 'Stairway' case

June 21, 2016
 Associated Press
Led Zeppelin's lawyers asked a judge to throw out a case accusing the band's songwriters of ripping off a riff for "Stairway to Heaven."
More

7th Circuit cuts attorney fees in Indy skyline photo case

June 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals found the district court did not calculate attorney fees correctly in a dismissed copyright lawsuit and remanded the case so the correct amount could be awarded.
More

‘Stairway’ trial opens with questions about obscure ‘Taurus’

June 15, 2016
 Bloomberg News
The trial over whether Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page and Robert Plant stole the iconic opening riff to “Stairway to Heaven" opened with testimony about when the British rockers might have heard the 1968 song they’re accused of copying.
More

Ready to rock out at Zeppelin ‘Stairway’ trial? Try sheet music

June 14, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Anyone with internet access can listen for themselves to whether Led Zeppelin’s opening “Stairway to Heaven” riff rips off a song recorded three years earlier. But the jury deciding the fate of the rock masterpiece — and its millions of dollars in royalties — won’t hear a simple mash-up with the obscure 1968 instrumental “Taurus” by the group Spirit.
More

Oracle and Google to replay World Series of copyright trials

May 10, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Oracle Corp. and Google are stepping before a jury a second time with potentially $9.3 billion on the line, and the prospect of profoundly changing how software is protected and licensed.
More

Led Zeppelin can exit 'Stairway' suit for just $1

April 27, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Lawyers suing members of rock supergroup Led Zeppelin say their client is willing to settle a lawsuit over the band's most famous song — a claim potentially worth millions of dollars — for just $1.
More

Florida artist suing Wine & Canvas for second time

April 15, 2016
Scott Olson, IBJ Staff
A Florida artist again is suing the Indianapolis-based Wine & Canvas chain, claiming its owners infringed upon the copyrights of her paintings by using them at the chain's painting parties without her permission.
More

Judge clears ‘Stairway to Heaven’ copyright case for trial

April 13, 2016
 Associated Press
A trial is needed to determine if Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” copies its opening notes from a song performed by the rock band Spirit, a federal judge has ruled.
More

High court rejects appeal in Batmobile copyright case

March 7, 2016
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court is staying out of a copyright dispute involving a California man who produced replicas of the Batmobile for car-collecting fans of the caped crusader.
More

Publisher to pay $14M in 'Happy Birthday' copyright case

February 9, 2016
 Associated Press
Music publisher Warner/Chappell Music will return $14 million in fees to settle a lawsuit that challenges its claim to "Happy Birthday," one of the world's best-known songs.
More

Led Zeppelin members deposed in 'Stairway to Heaven' lawsuit

February 3, 2016
 Bloomberg News
The surviving members of Led Zeppelin have all been questioned in a lawsuit that alleges their hit "Stairway to Heaven" was filched from an obscure song by the band Spirit. Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and Robert Plant were each deposed separately over the past month as part of pretrial discovery in the copyright infringement case, new filings in Los Angeles federal court show.
More

LeBron, Kobe tattoos in video games trigger copyright suit

February 2, 2016
 Bloomberg News
LeBron James and Kobe Bryant are at the center of an obscure legal battle over a simple question: Can tattoos be copyrighted?
More

Today’s battle over streaming and videos

August 12, 2015
Craig Pinkus
Copyright protection is recognized in the Constitution, and the Act preempts all state laws creating the same or equivalent rights. But it doesn’t preempt protection for recordings made before 1972 under state statutes or common law until 2067.
More

Indy skyline photo copyright appeal not fully developed

June 30, 2015
Dave Stafford
A lawyer and photographer’s appeal in a copyright lawsuit over unlicensed use of his photo of the Indianapolis skyline was improper, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday, dismissing the appeal.
More

Judge rules for defendants in Indy skyline photo copyright suit

August 27, 2014
Dave Stafford
A retired attorney and photographer who has filed numerous infringement lawsuits over the use of his copyrighted photo of the Indianapolis skyline lost a contested case. The ruling judge also said the purported value of the photo is questionable.
More

Attorney sues hundreds over use of city skyline picture

April 9, 2014
Dave Stafford
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Attorney Richard Bell says his picture of the Indianapolis skyline is worth $1,500 or so if you’ve posted it on your website without first paying him to license it.
More

Copyright infringement spurs knife fight in Warrick County

March 12, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A copyright infringement dispute between two out-of-state companies has spurred criminal charges in Warrick County, a place where neither business has facilities, employees or quite possibly ever visited before these charges were brought.
More

Judge finds Google's book project 'transformative'

December 4, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys differ on whether the recent ruling benefits society or opens the door for infringement.
More

Judges reaffirm reversal of truck forfeiture in pirated movies case

April 1, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals granted the state’s petition for rehearing in a case in which the judges ruled a man shouldn’t have had his truck taken by the state because he sold pirated movies from it. But the appellate court again ruled in favor of Michael Curtis.
More

COA reversal of truck forfeiture allows movie fan to drive off into the sunset

January 29, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
In a reversal of a trial court’s ruling, the Indiana Court of Appeals held that a man who pleaded guilty to selling pirated movies should not have had his truck taken by the state because violating copyright is not the same as stealing goods
More

'Hologram' performance by Tupac creates legal questions for IP lawyers

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Fans raved about the "hologram" Tupac Shakur's performance at Coachella. For intellectual property lawyers, Tupac’s virtual return to the stage raises some interesting questions.
More

Federal anti-streaming bill has broad implications

July 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Putting a video on YouTube and embedding that video onto another site could be all it takes to commit a felony under a statutory amendment before the U.S. Senate.
More

Anti-piracy legislation tackles IP enforcement

October 13, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The notion of pirates pillaging treasures and bartering it on the high seas isn’t that far fetched for Indianapolis intellectual property attorney Jonathan Polak.
More
Page  1 2 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. This law is troubling in two respects: First, why wasn't the law reviewed "with the intention of getting all the facts surrounding the legislation and its actual impact on the marketplace" BEFORE it was passed and signed? Seems a bit backwards to me (even acknowledging that this is the Indiana state legislature we're talking about. Second, what is it with the laws in this state that seem to create artificial monopolies in various industries? Besides this one, the other law that comes to mind is the legislation that governed the granting of licenses to firms that wanted to set up craft distilleries. The licensing was limited to only those entities that were already in the craft beer brewing business. Republicans in this state talk a big game when it comes to being "business friendly". They're friendly alright . . . to certain businesses.

  2. Gretchen, Asia, Roberto, Tonia, Shannon, Cheri, Nicholas, Sondra, Carey, Laura ... my heart breaks for you, reaching out in a forum in which you are ignored by a professional suffering through both compassion fatigue and the love of filthy lucre. Most if not all of you seek a warm blooded Hoosier attorney unafraid to take on the government and plead that government officials have acted unconstitutionally to try to save a family and/or rescue children in need and/or press individual rights against the Leviathan state. I know an attorney from Kansas who has taken such cases across the country, arguing before half of the federal courts of appeal and presenting cases to the US S.Ct. numerous times seeking cert. Unfortunately, due to his zeal for the constitutional rights of peasants and willingness to confront powerful government bureaucrats seemingly violating the same ... he was denied character and fitness certification to join the Indiana bar, even after he was cleared to sit for, and passed, both the bar exam and ethics exam. And was even admitted to the Indiana federal bar! NOW KNOW THIS .... you will face headwinds and difficulties in locating a zealously motivated Hoosier attorney to face off against powerful government agents who violate the constitution, for those who do so tend to end up as marginalized as Paul Odgen, who was driven from the profession. So beware, many are mere expensive lapdogs, the kind of breed who will gladly take a large retainer, but then fail to press against the status quo and powers that be when told to heel to. It is a common belief among some in Indiana that those attorneys who truly fight the power and rigorously confront corruption often end up, actually or metaphorically, in real life or at least as to their careers, as dead as the late, great Gary Welch. All of that said, I wish you the very best in finding a Hoosier attorney with a fighting spirit to press your rights as far as you can, for you do have rights against government actors, no matter what said actors may tell you otherwise. Attorneys outside the elitist camp are often better fighters that those owing the powers that be for their salaries, corner offices and end of year bonuses. So do not be afraid to retain a green horn or unconnected lawyer, many of them are fine men and woman who are yet untainted by the "unique" Hoosier system.

  3. I am not the John below. He is a journalist and talk show host who knows me through my years working in Kansas government. I did no ask John to post the note below ...

  4. "...not those committed in the heat of an argument." If I ever see a man physically abusing a woman or a child and I'm close enough to intercede I will not ask him why he is abusing her/him. I will give him a split second to cease his attack and put his hands in the air while I call the police. If he continues, I will still call the police but to report, "Man down with a gunshot wound,"instead.

  5. And so the therapeutic state is weaonized. How soon until those with ideologies opposing the elite are disarmed in the name of mental health? If it can start anywhere it can start in the hoosiers' slavishly politically correct capital city.

ADVERTISEMENT