Courts

Justices: emotional distress actions not barred

December 13, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court held Tuesday that separate actions by parents seeking damages for emotional distress from experiencing the stillbirth of their child are not barred by the Indiana Child Wrongful Death Act or the Indiana Medical Malpractice Act.
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COA rules on right of first refusal issue

December 13, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals concluded that the right of first refusal set forth in a purchase agreement of land between neighbors could only be exercised between the two neighbors and didn’t apply to the sale of land by an estate.
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Court clarifies original ruling on spousal maintenance

December 13, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
On rehearing, the Indiana Court of Appeals addressed the issue of an ex-husband’s ability to pay incapacity maintenance to his spouse, but affirmed its original opinion in all respects.
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1.8M cases filed in Indiana in 2010

December 13, 2011
IL Staff
Nearly two million new cases were filed in Indiana courts in 2010, a 3 percent increase as compared to 2001, according to the annual Indiana Judicial Service Report released Tuesday.
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SCOTUS takes Arizona immigration case, 7th Circuit bankruptcy case

December 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States has accepted several cases, including the high-profile Arizona immigration lawsuit and a bankruptcy case from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.
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Justices take guest statute case

December 12, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has accepted a case that deals with whether a tort claim filed by a son against his father should be precluded by the Indiana Guest Statute. The case prompted each judge on the Indiana Court of Appeals panel that heard the case to author an opinion.
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Former IURC chairman indicted

December 12, 2011
IL Staff
The former chairman of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, David Lott Hardy, has been indicted by a Marion County grand jury on felony official misconduct charges, the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office announced Monday.
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Shepard to speak at IU commencement

December 9, 2011
IL Staff
On the heels of the announcement that Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard is retiring from the Indiana Supreme Court, Indiana University announced this week that the justice will address graduates at the Bloomington campus’ winter commencement Dec. 17.
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Judges dismiss man's untimely appeal

December 9, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals rejected a man’s argument that even though his appeal was untimely, the court should still address his appeal because of “considerations of justice.”
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Appellate court upholds murder conviction

December 9, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Indiana Court of Appeals found the circumstantial evidence presented at trial was sufficient to establish beyond a reasonable doubt that a man killed his wife.
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COA to consider journalistic shield protections for anonymous online comments

December 9, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals hears arguments Monday on a question of first impression for the Internet-savvy 21st century: whether news outlets have any First Amendment or state journalistic shield protection from being required to disclose information that could help reveal the identities of people posting anonymous comments online.
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Bankruptcy judge applications being accepted

December 8, 2011
IL Staff
The Judicial Council of the 7th Circuit is seeking applications for bankruptcy judge to fill a new position in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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COA reverses termination of mother's parental rights

December 8, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals found Thursday that the trial court findings in a parental termination case out of Dearborn County do not support the decision to terminate a mother’s parental rights to three of her children.
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Indiana chief justice's retirement 'a natural thing'

December 7, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Indiana Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard – the longest-serving state court chief justice in the nation – is retiring from the bench in March after nearly 27 years on the appellate bench and a quarter century in that top administrative position.
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Husband allowed to petition for survivor's allowance

December 7, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Even though a wife had filed for divorce from her husband at the time she was killed, the husband is still allowed to petition for survivor’s allowance, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed Wednesday.
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Court upholds judgment for doctor, health care center

December 7, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
A woman who challenged the grant of summary judgment on her negligence claims in favor of the doctor who performed her breast reduction surgery and the heath care center where it was performed lost her appeal before the Indiana Court of Appeals.
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Shepard retiring as Indiana chief justice

December 7, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Indiana Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard announced Wednesday that he is stepping down from the bench in March 2012.
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Jury awards $27M in damages

December 7, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The damages trial dealt with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder issues stemming from a propane water heater explosion.
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Juvenile judge returns from military mission

December 7, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Judge Marilyn Moores spent nearly a year teaching Afghans how to put an agricultural infrastructure in place, helping create a public defense system for that country and strengthening the role women lawyers have in shaping that society for the future.
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Junior Achievement case swells with defendants

December 7, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin

Seventeen parties have been named in ex-CEO Jeffrey Miller's defamation suit.

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Standing up for the judiciary

December 7, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana plans to address attacks on courts and judges.
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Disciplinary Actions - 12/7/11

December 7, 2011
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended and who receive a public reprimand by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Judge rules on case involving legislative walkout fines

December 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A Marion Superior judge has ruled that state courts don’t have the ability to interfere with the Indiana General Assembly’s constitutional authority to pass laws or its own internal rules, including how it compels attendance or imposes fines.
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Man gets 326 months imprisonment, lifetime supervision for child pornography

December 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
U.S. Judge Robert Miller Jr. sentenced an Elkhart man to 326 months in prison and a lifetime of supervised release after his guilty plea to sexually exploiting children.
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COA affirms denial of motion to suppress

December 6, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The actions of police officers who showed up on a man’s property to investigate a complaint – which led to the discovery of marijuana plants – were reasonable, according to the Indiana Court of Appeals.
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  1. Major social engineering imposed by judicial order well in advance of democratic change, has been the story of the whole post ww2 period. Contraception, desegregation, abortion, gay marriage: all rammed down the throats of Americans who didn't vote to change existing laws on any such thing, by the unelected lifetime tenure Supreme court heirarchs. Maybe people came to accept those things once imposed upon them, but, that's accommodation not acceptance; and surely not democracy. So let's quit lying to the kids telling them this is a democracy. Some sort of oligarchy, but no democracy that's for sure, and it never was. A bourgeois republic from day one.

  2. JD Massur, yes, brings to mind a similar stand at a Texas Mission in 1836. Or Vladivostok in 1918. As you seemingly gloat, to the victors go the spoils ... let the looting begin, right?

  3. I always wondered why high fence deer hunting was frowned upon? I guess you need to keep the population steady. If you don't, no one can enjoy hunting! Thanks for the post! Fence

  4. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  5. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

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