Disciplinary Actions

Disciplinary Actions - 10/26/12

October 24, 2012
IL Staff
See what attorney has been held in contempt by the Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 10/12/12

October 10, 2012
Read who's had his license revoked and who has been suspended by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 9/28/12

September 26, 2012
IL Staff
Read who has been suspended, reprimanded, held in contempt or reinstated by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 9/14/12

September 12, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's been reinstated by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - Aug. 31, 2012

August 29, 2012
IL Staff
Read who has resigned and who was suspended.
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Disciplinary actions - Aug. 17, 2012

August 15, 2012
IL Staff
Read who has been suspended by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 8/3/12

August 1, 2012
IL Staff
See who's been suspended and who's resigned from the Indiana bar.
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Disciplinary Actions - 7/20/12

July 18, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's resigned and who's been suspended in Indiana.
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Disciplinary Actions - 7/6/12

July 4, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's been disbarred and suspended in Indiana.
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Disciplinary Actions - 6/22/12

June 20, 2012
IL Staff
See who's been suspended and reinstated in Indiana.
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Disciplinary Actions - 6/8/12

June 6, 2012
Learn who's been suspended, reinstated, or had charges dismissed.
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Disciplinary Actions - 5/11/12

May 9, 2012
IL Staff
See who's been suspended from practice in Indiana.
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Disciplinary Actions - 4/27/12

April 25, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's been held in contempt, suspended or reinstated.
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Disciplinary Actions - 4/13/12

April 11, 2012
See who's been suspended by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 3/30/12-4/12/12

March 28, 2012
See who's received a public reprimand and who has been suspended.
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Disciplinary Actions -3/2/12

February 29, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's received a public reprimand and who has resigned from the bar.
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Disciplinary Actions - Feb. 17-March 1, 2012

February 15, 2012
IL Staff
See who's been suspended and who has received a public reprimand.
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Disciplinary Actions -1/20/12

January 18, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended and who has resigned.
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Disciplinary Actions -1/6/12

January 4, 2012
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended from the practice of law in Indiana.
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Disciplinary Actions - 12/21/11

December 21, 2011
Read who's been suspended from the practice of law.
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Disciplinary Actions - 12/7/11

December 7, 2011
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended and who receive a public reprimand by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary actions 11/23/11

November 23, 2011
IL Staff
Read the latest disciplinary actions issued by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Disciplinary Actions - 11/9/11

November 9, 2011
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended and who's had their suspensions terminated.
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Disciplinary Actions - 10/12/11

October 12, 2011
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended or resigned.
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Disciplinary Actions - 9/28/11

September 28, 2011
IL Staff
Read who's been suspended or received a public reprimand.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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