Diversity

Early education efforts expose youth to various careers in law

July 2, 2014
Dave Stafford
Harrison Ndife and his peers gathered at the end of a long week to kick back, talk shop and do a little networking. A rising sophomore at Terre Haute South High School, Ndife had just completed the Summer Legal Institute along with 39 other eighth-graders and high-schoolers. They learned what it will take for them to become lawyers and where their place in the profession might be.
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Youth Summer Legal Institute set for IU McKinney

June 6, 2014
Dave Stafford
Teenagers interested in legal careers will learn from judges, lawyers and other legal professionals at a program June 16-20 at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis.
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McKinney honored for efforts to eliminate discrimination

January 14, 2014
IL Staff
Attorney and law school benefactor Robert H. McKinney is being honored by the Anti-Defamation League for his work combating discrimination and hate.
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Legal profession lags in diversity as compared to other professions

December 11, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
Minority employment in the legal profession has grown significantly slower as compared to certain medical and business professions, according to a study released by Microsoft Corp.
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INBOX: State bar needs to speak up on marriage equality

December 4, 2013
Shawn Marie Boyne writes that the Indiana State Bar Association needs to speak up in defense of marriage equality like the American Bar Association has.
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Gary mayor issues call to action for attorneys

September 11, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson implored members of the Marion County Bar Association to speak up because the gains made by previous generations of African-Americans are being rolled back.
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Diversity in legal community growing, but pace too slow

September 11, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
When small-firm founder Nathaniel Lee was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1982, only four African-American attorneys were working at large law firms in the state. Thirty years later when Rubin Pusha was admitted to practice in 2012, diversity had improved with the number of minority lawyers increasing at large and small firms alike. Others cleared the trail for Pusha but, as he looks around, he is still one of too few minority attorneys.
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Gary Mayor reminds MCBA of history, pushes action

August 26, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Gary mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson implored members of the Marion County Bar Association to speak up because the gains made by previous generations of African-Americans are being rolled back.
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Indiana law firms named among best for women

August 9, 2013
IL Staff
Three law firms based in Indiana or with offices in the state are among the 50 Best Law Firms for Women in the annual list compiled by Working Mother and consulting firm Flex-Time Lawyers LLC.

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Dissolution of same-sex marriages a legal puzzle for lawyers, judges

July 17, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana statute makes clear the state’s position on same-sex marriage, but it also leaves murky the rights of Hoosier couples who, despite the law, are legally married.
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Faegre Baker Daniels seeks applicants for diversity fellowship program

July 10, 2013
IL Staff
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP is now accepting applications for its 2014 Diversity & Inclusion Fellowship program. The fellowships provide experience and mentorship to second-year law students in one of firm’s seven offices.
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SCOTUS decides high-profile cases in term's final weeks

July 3, 2013
IL Staff
The Supreme Court of the United States issued the final decisions of the 2012 term June 26. In addition to the Vance v. Ball State University ruling on the definition of “supervisor,” several of the decisions handed down during waning days of the term promise to have far-reaching impact.
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Taking them at their word

May 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The work of interpreters is exhausting, but vital to protecting individual rights.
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Moberly breaks barrier on federal bench

March 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana's first female bankruptcy is judge one of two new jurists in the Southern District.
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Rejecting the traditional legal career path

December 19, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Statistics may not provide a complete picture of female attorneys’ career aspirations.
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Vinovich takes the helm of Indiana State Bar Association

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The incoming president will launch 3-year initiative to focus on member benefits, diversity and governance.
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Too little diversity among attorneys

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
St. Joseph County Bar Association Diversity Committee recently organized a Diversity and Inclusion Summit to shed light on the low number of minorities in the law and bounce around ideas about attracting more minorities, women, and gays and lesbians to the practice of law.
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St. Joe Bar Association to present diversity summit

September 6, 2012
IL Staff
The Diversity Committee of the St. Joseph County Bar Association is hosting a presentation on diversity in the legal profession Sept. 24, which will include former Indiana Justice Frank Sullivan Jr. discussing inclusion among the judiciary and the selection of judges.
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Indiana justice gender issue resurfaces

August 15, 2012
Dave Stafford
Experts say a lack of multiple female Indiana Supreme Court finalists raises concerns.
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Law firms embrace marketing geared toward the female client

July 18, 2012
Kelly Lucas
As women have claimed their place in executive and administrative offices, becoming key decision makers for small and large businesses, professional service providers have become creative in their approach to maintaining relationships with female clients.
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MCBA puts renewed focus on diversity

July 18, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
TaKeena Thompson, president of the Marion County Bar Association, wants lawyers to know that the MCBA is just as important today as it was when it was founded in 1925.
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ITLA chief seeks bridge between young and veteran lawyers

June 6, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Diversity and training are other key initiatives for new president Mark Scott.
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Fund will build on Shepard's legacy of promoting diversity

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
Former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard’s commitment to diversity will continue thanks to a permanent fund that aims to expand on his pioneering efforts to make the legal profession more reflective of society at large.
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Fund supports diversity in profession

May 11, 2012
Dave Stafford
A celebration of former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard on Thursday set the stage for the launch of a fund in his name that will continue his legacy of promoting diversity.
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Justice applicant pool reflective of Indiana

February 15, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The percentage of women in the semi-finalist group to be the next state justice decreased as compared to the state's population.
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  1. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  2. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  3. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  4. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  5. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

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