Economy

Survey: Midlevel associate satisfaction hits new high

August 29, 2013
IL Staff
Associates in their third, fourth and fifth years at large law firms report the highest overall level of job satisfaction seen in the 10-year history of a survey on the topic.
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More 2012 law grads find jobs, but overall employment rate dips

June 21, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
The overall employment rate for 2012 law school graduates is at the lowest its been in nearly 20 years, according to data released by NALP Thursday.
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Ice Miller, Bingham Greenebaum Doll reduce downtown office space

June 20, 2013
Scott Olson
A couple of Indianapolis’ largest law firms are giving up space in two downtown office towers, exemplifying how the legal profession is shifting the way in which it conducts business.
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Changing times change mergers and acquisitions practice

June 19, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
In the manufacturing hub of Elkhart, attorney Mike Pianowski has noticed the mergers and acquisitions market rebounding.
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Pro bono efforts reflect culture of southwestern Indiana attorneys

June 5, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A reflection of the southwestern Indiana legal community’s commitment comes during Evansville’s Law Day celebration. The day begins with the local attorneys reciting the Indiana Oath of Attorneys. The last clause of that oath speaks to not forsaking the poor and to the attorneys’ obligation to not turn away people from justice.
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Chief Justice Roberts says cuts to judiciary budget becoming too deep

May 22, 2013
Describing the immediate impact changes in judicial budgets have on court staff, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts used part of his address to the 7th Circuit Bar to highlight the fiscal constraints judges and courts are facing today.
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New lawyers find bloom still not on hiring rose

May 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
With headlines still screaming about the glut of lawyers and recent law school graduates struggling to find jobs that will enable them to repay their student loans, Andrea Kochert admits she is probably not the typical law school student.
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Law school applications drop over last 2 years

April 24, 2013
Scott Olson
Applications to three of the four Indiana law schools are in free fall as prospective students think twice about taking on mountains of debt at a time when job prospects are dim.
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Many efforts arise to address abandoned property, few go forward

March 27, 2013
Dave Stafford
State Sen. Jim Merritt wanted to help an eastside Indianapolis church gain possession of some long-abandoned, derelict houses, tear them down and establish a neighborhood park. But it turned out there wasn’t much the law allowed the church to do.
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Tax clinic brings relief to homeowners fighting high assessments

March 27, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
At Faegre Baker Daniels LLP, the attorneys suspected there was a gap in pro bono tax help for owners of homes valued at $150,000 or less. They were looking for a volunteer opportunity so they organized the first ever Homeowner Property Tax Clinic.
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Law firm's longtime chief gives suitors cold shoulder

February 27, 2013
Scott Olson
Alan Levin has been managing partner of Barnes & Thornburg LLP for 16 years, far longer than the heads of most major Indianapolis law firms. But what most sets him apart is that he’s built his firm into a national practice by taking the maverick approach of going it alone instead of merging with an out-of-state rival.
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Barrister brewers

February 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law graduates forgo legal careers to become craft beer makers in Indianapolis.
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Indiana law schools change curriculum to chart new course

February 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Like many of their educational colleagues across the country, Indiana law schools have been reviewing and rethinking the way they prepare their students for the legal profession.
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IU professor: Legal education in the US needs to change

February 13, 2013
Abigail Johnson Donohoo
In his "Blueprint for Change" research paper, Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor William Henderson says the legal education system needs to change. He also offers a plan to transform legal education to better fit the changing legal marketplace.
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Sequestration would deepen staff cuts, chief judges warn

January 16, 2013
Dave Stafford
Federal courts that have squeezed staff as budgets shrank could be forced to furlough employees if Congress fails to avoid mandatory budget cuts that now are slated to take effect in March.
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Confronting shrinking interest rates

January 16, 2013
Kathleen McLaughlin
Investment strategists: Don't assume fixed-income means no risk
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Attorneys coping with more domestic violence cases

January 2, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Domestic violence has been increasing in recent years along with what family law attorneys are observing as more anger and more meanness.
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Hybrid office solutions giving attorneys new ways to practice

December 5, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys are opting out of the long-term commitment of buying and renting space for "virtual" offices they use a few times a month.
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From Indy, Ogletree Deakins goes global

December 5, 2012
Dave Stafford
Managing shareholder Kim Ebert drives strategy as the firm joins international practitioners.
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More companies planning holiday parties, survey says

November 30, 2012
Scott Olson
More companies seem to be in the holiday spirit this year. Survey results released this week by Chicago-based employment consultancy Challenger Gray & Christmas Inc. show 83 percent of companies polled plan holiday parties this December.
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Low pay leads to high job turnover

November 21, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Salaries in the public sector are causing the criminal justice system to suffer.
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Proposal would create umbrella commission for legal aid providers

October 10, 2012
Dave Stafford
A proposal before the Indiana Supreme Court could change the landscape for those who provide civil legal aid and pro bono service.
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From iPhones to networks, law firm spending on systems ticks up

October 10, 2012
Dave Stafford
If your firm hasn’t bought you a new smartphone, provided better remote access options, or replaced an aging monitor lately, you might nudge the purchasing department.
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Economy and waning tax revenue put strain on courts

June 19, 2012
IL Staff
The Indiana University Public Policy Institute, a part of IU’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, released an issue brief Tuesday saying that Indiana’s courts are doing more with less as a result of the nation’s economic downturn, reduced local funding and increased demand.
 
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Legal aid provider closes

June 7, 2012
IL Staff
On June 6, the Community Organizations Legal Assistance Project Inc., doing business as the Community Development Law Center, announced that it had ceased operations on April 4.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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