Employment

Black lawyers who rose through ranks of larger firms see vast changes

July 12, 2017
Dave Stafford
African-American partners with decades in practice said their experiences helped open opportunities for younger lawyers and increase discussions about diversity in general, but they acknowledge challenges persist.
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Holcomb bars criminal history question for most state job applicants

June 29, 2017
IL Staff
Applicants for state jobs in the executive branch will no longer be asked if they have ever been arrested or convicted of a crime.
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Legal service provider offers residency to law school graduates

June 28, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The dean of Notre Dame Law School, which participates in the program, says full-scale post-graduation training program would not be economically feasible or necessary.
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Judge: Krieg DeVault owes ex-partners who sued over compensation

June 13, 2017
Dave Stafford
A major Indianapolis law firm must pay three departed partners who sued, a judge has ruled, but it will be up to a judge or jury to determine whether paying the former employees would create a “substantial and material adverse effect” for the law firm partnership, as it has claimed in the case.
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Study: Millennials want to make partner on own track

May 3, 2017
Olivia Covington
According to a study recently released by Major Lindsey & Africa and Above the Law, roughly 44 percent of millennial law firm attorneys surveyed said they hope to someday make partner, either at the firm they’re currently with or at another firm. That result came as a surprise to Major Lindsey & Africa partners who, like many older attorneys, bought into the assumption that the law’s youngest employees were exploring options off the traditional partner track.
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Senate Republicans chief of staff, legal counsel leaving for law firm

April 26, 2017
IL Staff
Indiana Senate Majority Caucus Chief of Staff and Chief Legal Counsel Jeff Papa is leaving his legislative work to take a position with Barnes & Thornburg LLP later this summer, Indiana Senate President Pro Tem David Long announced Tuesday.
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Indiana State Bar Association seeks servant leader

April 5, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The coming vacancy in the Indiana State Bar Association’s executive director position has attracted national attention with more than 50 applications submitted even though the job opening was only posted about a month ago.
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Use of contract attorneys rising in importance and stature

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Contract attorneys no longer wear a scarlet letter as many firms and legal companies utilize these lawyers for their expertise and to lower firm costs.
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Lateral hiring up

February 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The pace of attorneys jumping from one firm to another is expected to continue this year.
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Minority law firm representation up modestly post-recession

January 9, 2017
Olivia Covington
Women and minorities have made small gains in representation in the legal community over the last seven years, though their representation in some areas of the legal profession is still below pre-recession levels, a new national report says.
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Networking is key in job hunt for new attorneys

November 2, 2016
Olivia Covington
The careers of today’s law school graduates will benefit most from the connections made through pre-professional experiences, a sentiment shared by law school career development professionals.
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Lawmaker takes job with firm at center of vaping controversy

September 16, 2016
Hayleigh Colombo, Indianapolis Business Journal
An Indiana lawmaker who voted two years in a row for legislation that put one private company in control of who could manufacture e-liquid for sale in Indiana has now gone to work for a division of that firm.
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Departing the partner track

August 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
Law firms are looking for talent and signing up attorneys who fit clients’ needs in flexible arrangements that eschew the traditional associate-to-partner model. The trend addresses the firms’ needs to contain costs and the desire of many lawyers for more work-life balance.
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Mixed jobs report for the Class of 2015

August 22, 2016
IL Staff
Although the Class of 2015 law school graduates posted an employment rate of 86.7 percent, the size of the class — the smallest since before the start of the Great Recession — is masking the decline in the legal market which created fewer actual jobs for the newest attorneys, according to a new study by the National Association for Law Placement.
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ABA poised to allow law students to get paid for externships

August 1, 2016
IL Staff
Law students may be able to take home a paycheck while earning academic credit at an externship under a proposal the American Bar Association House of Delegates will consider during the ABA’s annual meeting beginning Thursday in San Francisco.
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Associate pay raises also raise eyebrows

July 27, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Key to bringing on new clients and keeping existing ones is talent attorneys. Firms across the country, including in Indiana, are raising associate pay to attract those attorneys.
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South Bend releases diversity plan for hiring, promotions

July 19, 2016
 Associated Press
The city of South Bend has released a plan aimed at removing or reducing barriers to diversity and inclusion in hiring, career development and purchasing over the next three years. The plan will also help protect the city from future discrimination lawsuits.
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COA: Worker's comp board may overrule medical examiner

May 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a Worker's Compensation Board decision that a man did not sustain a cervical injury as a result of a workplace accident. The board was not required to follow treatment recommendations of an independent medical examiner who saw the man after his employer notified him of its intent to terminate temporary total disability benefits.
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Justices back company seeking legal fees from government

May 19, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court has ruled in favor of an Iowa trucking company that was trying to recover $4.7 million in legal fees from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission after a class action lawsuit against the company was thrown out.
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Deregulation touted for growth, innovation in legal profession

May 18, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
To revitalize the legal profession, an economist and Yale law student are calling for an end to the rules and regulations that require bar exam passage, prevent nonlawyers from practicing and prohibit anyone who does not hold a J.D. degree from owning law firms.
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ABA releases employment data for 2015 grads

May 3, 2016
Scott Roberts
The American Bar Association has released its annual employment reports for law schools for 2015 graduates. Of the four Indiana law schools included, Notre Dame Law School had the highest percentage of graduates working in full-time long-term positions where bar passage was required, while Valparaiso University Law School had the highest unemployment rate.
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Judge: 3 ex-Angie's List salespeople can stay at HomeAdvisor

April 19, 2016
Greg Andrews, Indianapolis Business Journal
A Hamilton County judge has shot down an effort by Angie’s List Inc.to prevent three top-performing salespeople who left the company late last year from working at the newly opened Indianapolis office of competitor HomeAdvisor.
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Women allege gender, race discrimination at Salesforce

April 8, 2016
Jared Council, Indianapolis Business Journal
Two women employed in the Indianapolis offices of Salesforce.com Inc. have filed federal discrimination lawsuits against the cloud-software giant, claiming the company passed them over for promotions on multiple occasions because of their race and gender.
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Disputes increase over who’s an employee and who’s an independent contractor

March 23, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Independent contractors have long been a part of the workforce. However, with the rise of on-demand service providers who run their businesses almost solely with independent contractors, closer scrutiny is being paid to what, exactly, these workers are in the new “gig economy.”
More

Cummins deputy GC to speak on employment diversity

March 11, 2016
IL Staff
Diversity in employment will be the focus at the spring Organizational Networking Luncheon presented by the Indianapolis Professional Association on April 3.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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