Faegre Baker Daniels

Baker & Daniels, Faegre & Benson confirm merger

October 12, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Tom Froehle, chief executive partner for Baker & Daniels, and Andrew Humphrey, chair of Faegre & Benson’s management committee, held a joint news conference Oct. 12 to formally announce that the two firms will merge, effective Jan. 1, 2012. The new firm – Faegre Baker Daniels – will have 770 attorneys and 45 consultants in the United States and abroad, Humphrey said.
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Baker & Daniels, Faegre & Benson confirm merger

October 12, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Tom Froehle, chief executive partner for Baker & Daniels, and Andrew Humphrey, chair of Faegre & Benson’s management committee, held a joint news conference Oct. 12 to formally announce that the two firms will merge, effective Jan. 1, 2012.
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Mergers increase following dry spell

October 12, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
More firms unite in 2011, seeking to broaden reach.
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Baker & Daniels in talks to merge with Minneapolis firm

August 12, 2011
Scott Olson
Baker & Daniels LLP, one of Indianapolis' largest and oldest law firms, is in merger discussions with a Minneapolis law firm and expects to complete a deal in October.
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South Bend attorney to investigate allegations of misconduct in Northern District

August 11, 2011
IL Staff
South Bend attorney Joseph D. Bradley has been appointed by Chief Judge Philip P. Simon to serve as special counsel to investigate allegations of attorney misconduct that are pending before the Attorney Grievance Committee for the Northern District of Indiana.
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Politics pivotal in legal world

December 22, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Some may say law and politics go together like love and marriage, but it’s more than a cliché when looking at how the Indiana legal community is being influenced and even transformed by the political process.
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Attorney sues condo developer over accessibility

October 19, 2010
Cory Schouten
A resident of the 3Mass condo development who uses an electric wheelchair is suing the developers for failing to provide handicap accessibility to a rooftop terrace overlooking downtown Indianapolis.
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Baker & Daniels hosts pro bono mediations

August 18, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
As a way to help judges and parties in paternity court in Marion County, an Indianapolis law firm recently offered conference rooms and support staff for a day of pro bono mediation in its offices, something firm members say they hope other law firms will consider if they have the available space.
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What's a patent worth?

July 7, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The question of “What is my patent worth?” is never an easy one to answer, according to intellectual property attorneys and others who specialize in helping patent holders determine what they should expect for a patent.
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Lawyer-owned bar opens in Indianapolis

July 7, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The Ball & Biscuit had its soft opening at 331 Massachusetts Ave. in Indianapolis June 24.
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Unique medical-legal partnership expands

June 23, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Practitioners involved with the state’s first medical-legal partnership are excited about the cases they’ve taken on, as they help patients who have unmet legal needs that can make medical conditions persist, if not worsen.
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Lawyers manage restaurants, legal work in Evansville, Fort Wayne, Indianapolis

May 12, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Usually being served by a lawyer is a bad thing. That is, unless the lawyer is offering a cool martini or a warm plate of shrimp and grits.
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Clinic raises $40,000 at annual event

May 11, 2010
IL Staff
The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic in Indianapolis raised more than $40,000 at its annual “Justice for all” event.
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The Midwest, Indianapolis legal markets prime for opportunities

March 31, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
Sommer Barnard. Locke Reynolds. Dann Pecar Newman & Kleiman. Those are just a few Indiana law firm names that are now only part of history.
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Baker & Daniels cuts more administrative staff

April 17, 2009
Elizabeth Brockett
Baker & Daniels, one of the largest Indiana-based law firms, has cut nine staff positions and implemented a wage freeze for operational staff.
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Baker & Daniels cuts operational staff

December 12, 2008
Michael Hoskins
Tough economic times are causing law firms across the country to consider staff cuts as a way to trim costs, and the Indiana legal market isn't an exception.
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Attorney named IU athletic director

October 28, 2008
IL Staff
For the second time this year, a Baker & Daniels attorney has been named athletic director at a university in the state. Indiana University selected partner Fred Glass as its new athletic director today.
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ND athletics director speaker at legal clinic event

October 23, 2008
IL Staff
The University of Notre Dame athletics director will be the keynote speaker at the Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic's annual Justice for All Celebration.
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Award recognizes medical-legal partnership

October 8, 2008
IL Staff
The Wishard Medical-Legal Partnership for Patient Health has received a Preventative Medicine and Public Health Award from the Indiana Public Health Foundation for its efforts to improve health care for children.
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Indy attorney named Notre Dame AD

July 17, 2008
Michael Hoskins
A longtime partner at Baker & Daniels' Indianapolis office is leaving the law firm after 28 years to become the new athletic director at his alma mater, the University of Notre Dame.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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