Federal agencies

Fall protection mandatory for residential jobsRestricted Content

September 14, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
On Oct. 1, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration will begin enforcing fall protection plans for residential contractors. The regulations have long applied to commercial construction, but this year marks the first that OSHA will begin requiring residential contractors to exercise the same level of caution when employees are working more than six feet above the ground.
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7th Circuit tackles 'novel' U visa review request

September 1, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled it does not have jurisdiction to review immigration orders denying a specialized visa to a non-citizen trying to stay in the country after assisting in an investigation or prosecution.
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DOJ: No charges against cops involved in arrest of Indianapolis teen

July 28, 2011
IL Staff
The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday that it’s closed its investigation into whether federal criminal civil rights charges should be filed against the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officers involved in the arrest of Indianapolis teenager Brandon Johnson. Johnson claimed officers used excessive force while trying to arrest him.
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Justices accept 5 cases

July 25, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has granted transfer to five cases, including a first impression issue dealing with Social Security income and restitution.
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Ruling against local planning, zoning officials has statewide implicationsRestricted Content

July 20, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Deciding where the planes fly in or out of an airport and how land and buildings are used on airport grounds became the pivotal issue in a recent lawsuit in Marion Superior Court.
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I-9 audits present legal concerns for businesses

July 6, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Indiana’s chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business issued a press release June 23, urging Indiana businesses to prepare for I-9 audits. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stepped up its audits of businesses nationwide in an effort to crack down on the employment of unauthorized immigrant workers.
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Federal anti-streaming bill has broad implications

July 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Putting a video on YouTube and embedding that video onto another site could be all it takes to commit a felony under a statutory amendment before the U.S. Senate.
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7th Circuit rules in favor of bank in lien dispute

May 11, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals had to decide whether the relevant property in a dispute between a bank and the Internal Revenue Service was the real estate the bank owned or if it was the rentals of that property. Whether the IRS’ tax lien could take priority over the bank’s lien hinged on the answer.
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Green construction poses legal risksRestricted Content

April 27, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Standard contracts aren't adequate for this budding industry.
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US Attorney fined for speeding

April 11, 2011
IL Staff
Joseph Hogsett, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, received a ticket for speeding in Owen County. Hogsett was driving 10 miles over the posted speed limit on State Road 46 when he was stopped and cited for speeding.
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OSHA withdraws workplace noise rule interpretation after opposition

March 30, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When it comes to workplace injury, one often overlooked and potentially devastating injury is hearing loss resulting from high noise levels in a workplace.
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2 U.S. attorneys retiring, replacements named

March 16, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Joseph H. Hogsett, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, has announced replacements for the two members of the office’s management team who are retiring next month.
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Insider's look at FBI

March 16, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
To continue to improve community relations, the Indianapolis office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation has expanded its Citizens’ Academy programs. Sessions around the state offer individuals the opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes look at the federal law enforcement agency.
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IU Indy to host environment, energy event

March 10, 2011
IL Staff
The forum, “National Energy Security: Challenges and Opportunities for the Midwest” at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis March 25 brings together state leaders, entrepreneurs, and experts to discuss energy security. The event is open to the public and also offers CLE credit.
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Would bill make immigrants feel unwelcome?

March 2, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
As a contentious immigration law that went into effect in Arizona last summer continues to be challenged and further changes are being considered by Arizona lawmakers, similar bills at the state and local level, including one in the Indiana Statehouse, have been gaining traction.
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Hogsett takes his oath as U.S. attorney

March 2, 2011
IL Staff
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana Joseph H. Hogsett took his official oath of office on Feb. 18 before a crowd of more than 200 members of the state’s legal community as well as U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. The investiture ceremony was held at the Indiana Repertory Theatre in Indianapolis.
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Financing new energy creators

February 16, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When attorney John Kirkwood sees a garbage dump, his mind not only starts wandering toward the renewable energy that could be produced at that site but also an expanding field of law that’s drawing more lawyers into the environmental fold.
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Hospitals seek Medicare reimbursement

January 20, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Several Indiana hospitals are suing the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services over a Medicare reimbursement dispute.
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FBI shares hate crime statistics

January 5, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
In late September 2010, as part of the FBI Citizen’s Academy in Indianapolis, agents passed around photos from a cross burning that took place four years earlier in Muncie.
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6 counties get federal grant for drug courts

December 21, 2010
IL Staff
Drug courts in Delaware, Marion, Monroe, Spencer, Vanderburgh, and Vigo counties will share $1 million from a Bureau of Justice Assistance Drug Court Discretionary Grant, the Indiana Supreme Court announced today. The award will help courts increase graduation rates and lower recidivism.
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ALJ didn't inform vocational expert on the totality of claimant's limitations

November 29, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a District Court’s upholding of the Social Security Administration’s denial of a woman’s application for benefits because the Administrative Law Judge erred by not including her moderate limitation on concentration, persistence, and pace in the hypothetical he posed to a vocational expert.
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Johnsen speaks publicly for first time in 2 yearsRestricted Content

November 24, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Two years ago this month, an Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor was named to the transition team of President Barack Obama, not quite knowing where that experience would lead.
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Death and tax uncertainty

November 24, 2010
Michael Hoskins
These days, it feels as though Uncle Sam is laughing at estate planning and wealth transfer attorneys.
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Johnsen to discuss confirmation process, rule of law Friday

November 18, 2010
IL Staff
For the first time since she was nominated to a post in the Department of Justice, Dawn Johnsen will give a public lecture at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington on Friday.
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Grants to bring improvements to Protective Order Registry

October 22, 2010
IL Staff
Federal grants from the Department of Justice will allow for enhancements to Indiana’s Protective Order Registry, including alerting victims by e-mail or text when an order is about to expire.
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  1. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  2. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

  3. This outbreak illustrates the absurdity of the extreme positions taken by today's liberalism, specifically individualism and the modern cult of endless personal "freedom." Ebola reminds us that at some point the person's own "freedom" to do this and that comes into contact with the needs of the common good and "freedom" must be curtailed. This is not rocket science, except, today there is nonstop propaganda elevating individual preferences over the common good, so some pundits have a hard time fathoming the obvious necessity of quarantine in some situations....or even NATIONAL BORDERS...propagandists have also amazingly used this as another chance to accuse Western nations of "racism" which is preposterous and offensive. So one the one hand the idolatry of individualism has to stop and on the other hand facts people don't like that intersect with race-- remain facts nonetheless. People who respond to facts over propaganda do better in the long run. We call it Truth. Sometimes it seems hard to find.

  4. It would be hard not to feel the Kramers' anguish. But Catholic Charities, by definition, performed due diligence and held to the statutory standard of care. No good can come from punishing them for doing their duty. Should Indiana wish to change its laws regarding adoption agreements and or putative fathers, the place for that is the legislature and can only apply to future cases. We do not apply new laws to past actions, as the Kramers seem intent on doing, to no helpful end.

  5. I am saddened to hear about the loss of Zeff Weiss. He was an outstanding member of the Indianapolis legal community. My thoughts are with his family.

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