Floyd County

Floyd County seeks to settle jail lawsuit for $1.23M

March 13, 2017
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana county has proposed settling a federal class action lawsuit alleging inhuman conditions at its jail for $1.23 million.
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Camm prosecutor reprimanded for book deal

January 13, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has imposed a public reprimand against a Floyd County prosecutor charged with violations of three Professional Conduct Rules after he failed to recuse himself from a case he planned to write a book about.
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Divided COA says trial court must hold hearing on order to pay

December 6, 2016
Olivia Covington
A Floyd County trial court cannot order debtors to make monthly payments toward a mortgage, taxes and insurance premiums in a foreclosure case without first holding a hearing on the debtors’ ability to pay, a divided Indiana Court of Appeals held Tuesday.
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Ex-prosecutor becomes Clark County chief public defender

October 19, 2016
 Associated Press
After nearly 14 years with the Floyd County Prosecutor's Office, Abraham Navarro has jumped over to Clark County to serve as chief public defender.
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Commission calls for Floyd County prosecutor's suspension

October 7, 2016
 Associated Press
The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission has asked the state's high court to suspend Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson over findings that he acted unethically in a triple-murder case.
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Prosecutor faces ethics sanction for book deal in Camm case

August 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson should be reprimanded by the Indiana Supreme Court for a book deal on a high-profile murder case against former Indiana State Trooper David Camm, recommends a hearing officer in Henderson’s discipline case. The hearing officer blasted the conduct of lawyers on both sides of the ethics matter.
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Former Indiana trooper reaches $450K settlement with Floyd County

August 18, 2016
 Associated Press
A former Indiana State Police trooper convicted twice but later acquitted in the slayings of his wife and two children will receive a $450,000 settlement from a southern Indiana county that helped prosecute him.
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Divided COA rules karate kick is an issue of material fact

May 24, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 that a man’s kick in karate class, which injured a woman, constituted an issue of material fact and reversed summary judgment in his favor.
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Indiana man charged with threatening Trump on YouTube

May 13, 2016
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana man has been charged with making threats against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and members of his family in a YouTube video.
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Supreme Court upholds man’s death sentence

April 12, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court affirmed a man’s death sentence Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to brutally murdering a woman.
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Floyd County faces class action over ‘stripping’ jail inmates

February 23, 2016
Dave Stafford
Floyd County jail inmates who claim they and more than 160 inmates were sometimes forcibly stripped of their clothes and placed in padded cells with little apparent cause may pursue a class-action civil-rights lawsuit against the county, sheriff and jail staff.
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Indiana’s 6 commercial courts set to begin June 1

January 21, 2016
IL Staff
Six commercial courts handling specialized dockets of business cases were announced Wednesday in an order of the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Floyd County judge to be Donnelly’s guest at State of the Union

January 6, 2016
IL Staff
U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly announced Wednesday that he has invited Floyd Superior Court 3 Judge Maria Granger as his guest to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union speech Jan. 12. Granger established Indiana’s first veterans court in 2011.
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Supreme Court affirms death sentence for Floyd County man

September 24, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Finding the trial court did not err or abuse its discretion during the selection of jurors for the murder trial of William Clyde Gibson II, the Indiana Supreme Court affirmed his death penalty sentence.
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Homeowners meet criteria for adverse possession of disputed property

June 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A church that challenged those who, it believed, trespassed failed to convince the Indiana Supreme Court that a disputed strip of land was actually part of its property.
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Leaky roof, mold among repair needs at Floyd County jail

April 13, 2015
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana jail is battling a leaky roof, mold and other problems that need costly repairs sooner than later, but financial challenges could make the work a daunting task.
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Floyd County prosecutor accused of misconduct

March 20, 2015
 Associated Press
A complaint has been filed against an attorney who led the prosecution against a former Indiana State trooper acquitted of killing his wife and two children.
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Serving those who served

November 5, 2014
Dave Stafford
More veterans courts are popping up around the state, with a focus on individual treatment and establishing mentorships.
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Acquitted ex-Ind. trooper sues police, prosecutors

October 27, 2014
 Associated Press
A former Indiana State Police trooper acquitted in the slayings of his wife and two children has sued prosecutors, investigators and others for false imprisonment and other counts.
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Indiana county settles dispute with forensics firm

October 6, 2014
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana county has reached a settlement in its billing dispute with a forensics company that testified on the prosecution's behalf last year in a triple-murder trial.
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Father granted custody after mother seeks relocation

September 12, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
Moving from Floyd County to Scott County so a woman could be closer to her work and live with her boyfriend is not in the best interests of her two young children, the Court of Appeals ruled Friday. The judges affirmed the grant of father’s request to modify custody and child support.
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Man acquitted in triple-slaying seeks new judgment

September 2, 2014
 Associated Press
A former Indiana State trooper acquitted last year in the slayings of his wife and two children is asking a judge to issue a judgment against a man convicted in the case nearly a decade ago, holding him accountable for their deaths.
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Suits in triple-slaying proceeds case move ahead

August 15, 2014
 Associated Press
A former Indiana state trooper shouldn't be allowed to claim all $626,000 in insurance and estate proceeds from the deaths of his wife and two children 14 years ago, even though he was acquitted of their murders, attorneys representing the family members argue in civil lawsuits.
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County jail officials in Southern Indiana accused of abusing inmates

June 16, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of former inmates accuses officials at the Floyd County jail of forcibly stripping the inmates of their clothing and keeping them naked in a padded cell for prolonged periods of time in violation of their constitutional rights.
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Camm seeking damages for wrongful incarceration

May 5, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
David Camm, the former Indiana State Police officer who served 13 years in prison before being acquitted of murdering his wife and two young children, is striking back at those who accused him.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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