Government

Appellate rulings can create confusion for attorneys, trial judges

August 4, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Clear and concise court rulings are what judges hope can be produced, so that lawyers and lower courts can have guidance on how to address a particular legal issue. But that doesn’t always happen.
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Court upholds discrimination claims in coroner's office

July 27, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the finding that an African-American Marion County Coroner took action against his white chief deputy coroner because of race, but ordered a reduction in the amount of compensatory damages the deputy coroner could receive.
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Federal office: No Hatch Act violations in Dearborn County

July 27, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A federal government office has cleared two Dearborn County officials who’d been accused by the former county attorney of violating federal law that restricts political activity for those involved with federally funded programs.
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No issue with all legislative logrolling

July 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court offered some clues recently about why it’s ignored repeated attempts to address the issue of legislative logrolling, where multiple unrelated changes are stuffed into one massive bill that becomes law.
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State changes victim alerts

July 21, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The Indiana Department of Correction recently changed how it will notify those who register to find out where someone is in the system, whether it’s a transfer from one jail to another, a change in status, or a legal hearing.
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Lawyer elected U.S. Libertarian Party officer

July 21, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
Mark Rutherford wants America’s third-largest political party to make inroads by showing competence at the grassroots level of government.
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Justices consider juvenile placements

July 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court is considering a case where a St. Joseph County juvenile judge has declared unconstitutional three statutes involving child placements, a controversial issue that’s pitted many within the state judiciary against the Indiana Department of Child Services for the past two years.
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Prosecutor candidate drops out of race

July 16, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The Democratic candidate for Gibson County Prosecutor has withdrawn from the race following his indictment on four charges, including possession of child pornography.
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Could Indiana adopt a law like Arizona's?

July 7, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Immigration attorneys and victims advocates are reading up on the Arizona illegal immigrant law and bracing themselves for what a similar bill in Indiana could mean for their clients.
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Judicial pay case gets ABA support

July 7, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The American Bar Association wants the Supreme Court of the United States to take a case that asks whether congressional denial of cost-of-living adjustments for federal judges compromises judicial independence and violates the Constitution.
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Partnership targets Indiana's corrections system

June 28, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
To address Indiana’s growing prison population and increasing related costs, the state is partnering with The Pew Center on the States and the Council of State Governments Justice Center for the first comprehensive review of the state’s criminal code and sentencing policies since 1976.
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Robo-calls at issue in Indiana courts

June 23, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A line of litigation has been playing out in state and federal courts involving what is and isn't allowed under the Automatic Dialing Machines Statute.
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Idea for green tech patents gets mixed reviews

June 23, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A federal plan to boost green technology innovation by dramatically cutting the patent processing time is drawing mixed reaction from intellectual property attorneys in Indiana as they wonder whether the pilot program will help or hurt their clients.
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Judge Magnus-Stinson takes oath

June 15, 2010
IL Staff
The newest judge for the Southern District of Indiana was sworn in Monday to officially become a U.S. District Judge.
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Criminal tax evasion offers legal option in targeting dog, puppy mills

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A July 2009 law put more strength behind local prosecutors and state regulators who can now more diligently pursue illegal animal activity of puppy mills who don't pay taxes.
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County official wants review of new ethics leader

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A Dearborn County commissioner alleges the county’s former attorney has wrongly accused two officials of violating federal law and has asked the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission to launch an investigation of its soon-to-be leader who starts in that office June 21.
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Court excited about magistrate's elevation

June 8, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Within a week, the state's third federal female judge could be ready to handle her constitutionally created duties in the Southern District of Indiana.
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Vote set on federal magistrate's nomination

June 1, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The U.S. Senate plans to vote Monday on an Indianapolis federal magistrate’s nomination for a constitutionally created judgeship in the Southern District of Indiana.
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7th Circuit won't stay ruling, despite likely SCOTUS appeal

May 28, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals won’t stay its ruling that allows an independent state agency access to records about mentally ill inmates’ treatment, even though the Indiana government agency being sued is appealing to the Supreme Court of the United States.
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ISBA receives award for juvenile justice summit

May 21, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The Indiana State Bar Association has learned it will receive the LexisNexis 2010 Community and Educational Outreach Award for the “Summit on Racial Disparities in the Juvenile Justice System: A Statewide Dialogue,” which took place in August 2009.
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Attorney General promotes 2 of its own internally

May 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Attorney General’s Office has promoted one of its longtime lawyers to a second-in-command spot that means guiding 144 state government attorneys and working more closely with local prosecutors, police officers, and those in the county criminal justice systems.
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Indianapolis law school grad tapped to lead TSA

May 18, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A former Hoosier attorney who graduated from Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis is now being tapped for a leading role at the federal agency responsible for strengthening security and screening measures at the nation's airports.
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7th Circuit rules against Indianapolis attorney

May 18, 2010
Michael Hoskins
An Indianapolis attorney has lost a federal appeal that involves his being forced to resign as manager of the title insurance division after writing a memo that criticized his boss.
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IMPD investigates Brizzi golf cart incident

May 17, 2010
Cory Schouten
The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department has opened an investigation into the circumstances surrounding an officer's injury at a 2008 fundraiser for Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi.
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Indiana AG officially joins health care suit

May 14, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Following through on a promise from more than a month ago, the Indiana Attorney General today joined a lawsuit challenging the new federal health care law passed by Congress earlier this year.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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