In-house counsel/corporate counsel

More women being hired as general counsel

June 5, 2017
IL Staff
A new report is hailing the increase in the number of women hired for general counsel jobs in Fortune 500 companies, a trend which is expected to continue.
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Women IP attorneys launch central Indiana chapter of ChIPS, one of first in Midwest

May 17, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
At a kickoff reception April 27, about 30 women came together to network and participate in a panel discussion examining the careers of women in IP. ChIPS co-founder Emily Ward, CEO of Calla Nava and alumnae of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, was the featured guest.
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Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s legal team races to meet challenges, rev up new events

May 3, 2017
Dave Stafford
Jimmie McMillian traded his partner position at the state’s largest law firm a year ago for a new legal career at perhaps Indiana’s most iconic and storied place, Indianapolis Motor Speedway. But like any top-level racer living the dream, McMillian’s fast to pass praise to his crew.
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Noblesville environmental consulting firm hires Zoeller

April 18, 2017
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
A Noblesville-based environmental firm has hired former Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller.
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Trend of in-house counsel doing more internally likely to continue

October 19, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Since the Great Recession and possibly a little before, businesses have been relying less on outside counsel and using in-house attorneys more to work on legal matters. The main drivers behind the trend are companies’ desire to save money as well as to increase efficiencies in getting work done.
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Commercial court cases increase; dockets now accessible online

September 28, 2016
Dave Stafford
Five of six judges of Indiana’s new commercial courts spoke to about 100 lawyers and corporate counsel Tuesday, urging them to make use of the venues that emphasize collaboration and prompt resolutions.
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Female corporate lawyers at Anthem find opportunity, no glass ceiling

September 7, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
At Anthem Inc., the billion-dollar health insurance provider, women comprise 76 percent of its workforce and 63 percent managerial leadership.
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Outsourced legal work increases, survey finds

August 19, 2016
IL Staff
A survey of in-house and outside counsel finds conflicting views about whether outsourced legal work has increased in the past year. Attorneys in firms and in-house positions who responded to the survey also both rated themselves higher than they rated each other.
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ITT Educational terminates chief legal officer

June 13, 2016
Indianapolis Business Journal
ITT Educational Services, the embattled Carmel-based operator of for-profit colleges in 38 states, has terminated its chief administrative and legal officer after less than two years on the job.
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Retailer sees litigation costs cut by nearly half under Ogletree Deakins program

June 1, 2016
Scott Roberts
Management at hhgregg realized it had a problem. It was spending too much in legal costs — more than $70,000 a month — and the retailer and its employees did not have a centralized place to go for legal answers.
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Keeping client relationships on track

May 18, 2016
Scott Roberts
As the Indianapolis Motor Speedway celebrates the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500, its legal partner has its own milestone with the track. It's one of several firms marking significant anniversaries this year.
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Study shows ‘problematic’ alcohol use by attorneys

March 23, 2016
Scott Roberts
A new study completed by the American Bar Association Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs and the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation has given some much needed data on lawyers struggling with substance abuse and depression.
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Cummins deputy GC to speak on employment diversity

March 11, 2016
IL Staff
Diversity in employment will be the focus at the spring Organizational Networking Luncheon presented by the Indianapolis Professional Association on April 3.
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Taking a 'side step' in the legal profession

February 10, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
From her desk, Elizabeth Ellis watched the attorneys in her office work and realized as many other paralegals have – I can do that.
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Access Group’s acquisition of Lawyer Metrics may help law schools, firms align goals

January 13, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
With its acquisition by Access Group, Bloomington-based Lawyer Metrics will be positioned to apply its data analysis expertise, and possibly increase its role, in helping legal education and the profession as a whole navigate ongoing changes.
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Survey: Succession planning a top concern for organizations

December 2, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Thirty-eighty percent of the respondents to the Indiana Lawyer’s 2015 Practicing Law in Indiana survey listed transition or succession planning as the greatest challenge to their organization’s viability. Only the issue of managing costs while protecting quality of service topped this concern, which 42 percent found to be the greatest challenge.
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Henderson: Survey reveals signs of fundamental change in the legal profession

December 2, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The traditional career path for Indiana attorneys – graduate from law school, become an associate in a law firm, work long hours and eventually become a partner – appears to be broken, or at least cracked.
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Survey results reveal range in hours of pro bono work performed annually

December 2, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The pro bono community still believes having attorneys donate their time and professional skills remains a viable method for providing services to low-income individuals and families. But Indiana attorneys overwhelmingly indicate they neither want to be told to volunteer nor be obligated to report their volunteer hours.
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Survey finds widespread professional satisfaction, little encouragement to pursue career in law

December 2, 2015
Dave Stafford
Life’s not bad being a lawyer. Work is satisfying, there’s time for life outside work, and the pay is good. But I wouldn’t recommend it. Those contradictions in lawyers’ prevailing attitudes were revealed in Indiana Lawyer's Practicing Law in Indiana survey.
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Focus for law firms: Clients, clients, clients

December 2, 2015
Dave Stafford
Law firms large and small face similar challenges – keeping costs down and quality high while also finding ways to sustain and grow the business.
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Survey: Attorney social media use largely governed by personal responsibility

December 2, 2015
Dave Stafford
By a more than 2-to-1 margin, attorneys who responded to the IL survey said their organization encourages them to promote themselves and their firm or organization, compared to those who said their organization discourages social media.
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Chief legal officers: cost pressures biggest issue

November 10, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
Chief legal officers say internal and external cost pressures were their biggest concern in managing their law departments this year, according to survey results released Tuesday by Altman Weil.
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Attorneys say juggling work and parenthood is worth the effort

November 4, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Figuring out how to balance the demands of practicing law with the needs of a family is a struggle that female attorneys have long faced, but increasingly male attorneys also want to be able to take time for their families.
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Total legal spending up 2 percent, survey says

October 12, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Total legal spending is up slightly – by 2 percent – according to HBR Consulting’s 2015 Law Department Survey. But, not surprisingly, outside counsel spending is flat compared with last year.
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Spring-back attorneys return to firm practice

June 17, 2015
 Bloomberg News
While many corporate legal departments are expanding as matters are worked on internally, some in-house counsel are counter trend, opting to leave their posts to join law firms. Most had worked for a firm for at least a few years, often at the beginning of their careers, before moving to companies.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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