In-house counsel/corporate counsel

Book chronicles Indy attorney’s role in Armstrong doping case

October 15, 2013
IL Staff
The role of an Indianapolis attorney in investigating and exposing doping by disgraced cycling champion Lance Armstrong is chronicled by two Wall Street Journal reporters in a book released Tuesday.
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Lilly, Simon lawyers make best-paid general counsel list

July 23, 2013
IL Staff
Attorneys for two Indianapolis-based Fortune 500 companies are among the 50 best-paid general counsel, according to a list published Monday by Corporate Counsel Magazine.
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From bridge builder to Boilermaker

March 27, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Steve Schultz is settling into his new position as Purdue's first in-house counsel.
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Indiana lawyer key player in anti-doping case

November 7, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Bill Bock worked for more than 2 years to uncover evidence against Lance Armstrong.
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Attorneys discuss key traits of in-house counsel jobs

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
With a handful of exceptions, rarely do new law graduates waltz into a general counsel job. Making careful decisions now, however, could create an opportunity to move from a law firm to a corporate law position.
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IMS attorney excels in fast-paced work environment

April 25, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Susan Rivas enjoys the sound of cars zipping around the track at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Her office window overlooks the back of the grandstand, about 100 feet away, where workers are busy readying the stands for thousands of visitors.
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Governor names new general counsel

December 16, 2011
IL Staff
Gov. Mitch Daniels announced Friday that Anita Kolkmeier Samuel, assistant general counsel and policy director for the governor, has been named general counsel. Samuel replaces David Pippen, who has resigned to accept a position with Indianapolis law firm Bose McKinney & Evans.
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Corporate counsel is running strong

December 7, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Indianapolis attorney Norm Wain creates a new national Association of Corporate Counsel committee on sports and entertainment law.
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Lawyer enjoys helping cities and towns

November 9, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Jodie Woods is general counsel for the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns, a role she's had since 1998.
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Lilly lawyer is leader in patent reform

October 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Robert Armitage nears 40 years of practicing IP-focused law.
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Farm Bureau counsel eyes laws of the land

September 14, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Environmental regulation and eminent domain are among top concerns for farmers.
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Lawyer lands winning in-house lottery job

August 3, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When Andrew Klinger decided to take a job as corporate counsel for a state agency, he was essentially playing the odds like someone buying a lottery ticket.
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The law of art

July 6, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Katie Zarich, deputy director of public affairs for the Indianapolis Museum of Art, had worked for the IMA for a year when she decided to go to law school. She applied only to Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis, knowing that she wanted to continue working for the museum as she attended class at night.
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Sports fan-turned-attorney finds dream job at NCAA

May 11, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Naima Stevenson’s love for sports began about the time she realized that sports fans in her household got to watch the big TV.
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Teamwork at IHSAA

April 13, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The general counsel for state athletic association enjoys the challenges of the job.
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Indianapolis bottle cap company creates global legal work

March 2, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A soda or water bottle on the desk at work or a jug of juice in the refrigerator at home might be merely a refreshing drink for most people. But it’s a day at the office for Stephanie Blackman, a corporate attorney in the business of bottle caps or, as they are known in the food and beverage industry, closure systems.
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Lawyer couples

February 16, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
While some couples prefer to keep their work and personal lives separate, it’s not unheard of for lawyers to pair up. Four couples shared their stories with Indiana Lawyer.
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Counsel sees benefit of 'growing up' with the company

February 2, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
Working for a company while in law school then staying at that company as a lawyer is fairly rare, but it happens. Even less common for today’s in-house counsel is starting at a company without a bachelor’s degree making $6 per hour doing data entry work and staying with that company through the completion of undergraduate and law school degrees.
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Top Lilly attorney leaving to become college president

January 20, 2011
J.K. Wall
Alecia DeCoudreaux, the top attorney for Eli Lilly and Co.’s U.S. unit, will leave to become president of Mills College, the Oakland, Calif.-based school announced Thursday.
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In-house counsel for Simon Property Group embraces the legalities of shopping

January 5, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Going to the mall isn’t an off-hours activity for Jason Schiesser.
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Counsel reenergizes section

December 14, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The immediate past chair of the Indiana State Bar Association's Corporate Counsel Section, Stephen Landrum Due, is one member of the leadership team who made a push to make the section more active.
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Corporate attorney serves as insurer's litigation counsel

November 10, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Crown Point attorney Shontrai Irving may be considered a success story in the legal world with multiple awards illustrating his experience in the corporate, criminal, and civil sides of the law. But that’s only one part of what he does, and while he loves the lawyering, it’s not what makes him the most proud.
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Hospital general counsel enjoys diverse workload

October 13, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
After spending 12 years in the health-care field as an X-ray technician, an in-house counsel for a hospital network in Indianapolis seems to be in the right place.
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Governor: 1-year cooling off period applies to ALJs

October 5, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The governor today fired the state's top utility regulator, citing ethical concerns about how a former Administrative Law Judge presided over cases involving a regulated energy company leading up to his taking a job there.
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Institution's lawyer finds client a hybrid

September 1, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Kiply Drew knows her job as an in-house counsel for the one of the country’s top 100 universities means every day is different.
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  1. What is the one thing the Hoosier legal status quo hates more than a whistleblower? A lawyer whistleblower taking on the system man to man. That must never be rewarded, must always, always, always be punished, lest the whole rotten tree be felled.

  2. I want to post this to keep this tread alive and hope more of David's former clients might come forward. In my case, this coward of a man represented me from June 2014 for a couple of months before I fired him. I knew something was wrong when he blatantly lied about what he had advised me in my contentious and unfortunate divorce trial. His impact on the proceedings cast a very long shadow and continues to impact me after a lengthy 19 month divorce. I would join a class action suit.

  3. The dispute in LB Indiana regarding lake front property rights is typical of most beach communities along our Great Lakes. Simply put, communication to non owners when visiting the lakefront would be beneficial. The Great Lakes are designated navigational waters (including shorelines). The high-water mark signifies the area one is able to navigate. This means you can walk, run, skip, etc. along the shores. You can't however loiter, camp, sunbath in front of someones property. Informational signs may be helpful to owners and visitors. Our Great Lakes are a treasure that should be enjoyed by all. PS We should all be concerned that the Long Beach, Indiana community is on septic systems.

  4. Dear Fan, let me help you correct the title to your post. "ACLU is [Left] most of the time" will render it accurate. Just google it if you doubt that I am, err, "right" about this: "By the mid-1930s, Roger Nash Baldwin had carved out a well-established reputation as America’s foremost civil libertarian. He was, at the same time, one of the nation’s leading figures in left-of-center circles. Founder and long time director of the American Civil Liberties Union, Baldwin was a firm Popular Fronter who believed that forces on the left side of the political spectrum should unite to ward off the threat posed by right-wing aggressors and to advance progressive causes. Baldwin’s expansive civil liberties perspective, coupled with his determined belief in the need for sweeping socioeconomic change, sometimes resulted in contradictory and controversial pronouncements. That made him something of a lightning rod for those who painted the ACLU with a red brush." http://www.harvardsquarelibrary.org/biographies/roger-baldwin-2/ "[George Soros underwrites the ACLU' which It supports open borders, has rushed to the defense of suspected terrorists and their abettors, and appointed former New Left terrorist Bernardine Dohrn to its Advisory Board." http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=1237 "The creation of non-profit law firms ushered in an era of progressive public interest firms modeled after already established like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ("NAACP") and the American Civil Liberties Union ("ACLU") to advance progressive causes from the environmental protection to consumer advocacy." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cause_lawyering

  5. Mr. Foltz: Your comment that the ACLU is "one of the most wicked and evil organizations in existence today" clearly shows you have no real understanding of what the ACLU does for Americans. The fact that the state is paying out so much in legal fees to the ACLU is clear evidence the ACLU is doing something right, defending all of us from laws that are unconstitutional. The ACLU is the single largest advocacy group for the US Constitution. Every single citizen of the United States owes some level of debt to the ACLU for defending our rights.

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