Indiana General Assembly

Bills would make changes to pro bono funding, court costs, early voting

January 5, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Indiana’s 2012 legislative session promises to be a busy one, with hundreds of bills already filed and a short session deadline of March 14. Read about some of the bills Indiana Lawyer is watching.
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Bill offers recognition to Indiana Miami tribe

January 4, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
State senator says acknowledgment of the tribe is overdue.
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New suit filed protesting immigration law

January 4, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund has filed a lawsuit on behalf of La Union Benefica Mexicana, a nonprofit organization in East Chicago, protesting two previously unchallenged portions of Indiana’s new immigration law.
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State senator named Logansport city attorney

January 3, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Sen. Randy Head, a sitting state senator, is now the city attorney for Logansport.
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Opinions divided on need for phosphorus regulation

December 21, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Fishing, boating and swimming are popular summer pastimes in Indiana, but increasingly, Hoosiers looking for a relaxing weekend at the lake are being warned to avoid the water altogether due to pollution.
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District judge and state senator to receive honorary BSU degrees

December 12, 2011
IL Staff
U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt and Indiana Sen. Luke Kenley will receive honorary doctor of laws degrees from Ball State University at its winter commencement Dec. 17.
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Labor law to be key issue in 2012

December 7, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Indiana legislators disagree about merits of right-to-work legislation.
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Judge rules on case involving legislative walkout fines

December 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A Marion Superior judge has ruled that state courts don’t have the ability to interfere with the Indiana General Assembly’s constitutional authority to pass laws or its own internal rules, including how it compels attendance or imposes fines.
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Stopped short

November 23, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
State tuition law creates chasm between undocumented immigrants and college.
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Code Revision Commission meets Tuesday

November 14, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana Code Revision Commission will hold its second meeting Tuesday. Members will discuss proposed technical corrections and other matters.
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Lawmakers to preview legislative session at Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis

November 14, 2011
IL Staff
Phi Alpha Delta, Hamill Chapter, will host a 2012 legislative preview from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesday at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis, Inlow Hall, Wynne Courtroom, 530 W. New York St.
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Barnes panel OKs proposed law changes

November 11, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A legislative study committee has approved proposed changes to state law that it hopes the Indiana General Assembly will consider in response to a state Supreme Court decision earlier this year.
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Barnes study committee to vote on final report

November 9, 2011
IL Staff
The interim subcommittee established as a result of the Indiana Supreme Court ruling in Barnes v. State will meet Thursday to vote on the adoption of a final report.
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Adding UPL to Indiana RICO statute

November 9, 2011
Michael Hoskins
An Indiana Supreme Court case involving an estate planning “trust mill” has led to a policy discussion about whether certain types of unauthorized practice of law should rise above a misdemeanor crime and involve a racketeering component.
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Appellate court rules man can challenge med mal cap's constitutionality

November 9, 2011
Michael Hoskins
An Indianapolis man will get an evidentiary hearing on whether the state's $1.25 million cap on medical malpractice awards is unconstitutional.
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Indiana has new ALJ chapter

November 8, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Two state government attorneys have founded the Indiana chapter of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary. Their goal is to organize and connect those individuals in the state who are working in an ALJ capacity.
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100 tort claim notices filed in State Fair stage collapse

November 2, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
As of Nov. 2, the Office of the Indiana Attorney General has received 100 tort claim notices related to the stage collapse at the Indiana State Fair in August. The deadline for submission of the tort claim form was Nov. 1.
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Lawmakers discuss sentencing

October 26, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Proposed changes would reclassify drug crimes and emphasize county oversight.
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Court rules on mistaken statutory language

October 24, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A mistaken statutory provision has led to a reversal of a decision by a trial court judge from Wells County.
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Lawmakers finalizing post-Barnes legislation proposals

October 21, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A legislative study committee is about a week away from finalizing its proposals to clarify state law and allow for Indiana residents to use reasonable force to resist police entry into their homes in all but domestic violence and certain emergency situations.
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Committees meet this week to discuss Barnes, code revision

October 17, 2011
IL Staff
A legislative subcommittee meeting Thursday will consider preliminary drafts of legislation to clarify Indiana law in the wake of the Indiana Supreme Court’s decision upholding that residents have no common law right to resist police entering a person’s home.
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Lawmakers taking second look at 'second chance law'

October 14, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Legislators want to take a second look at a new law passed this year that gives Indiana residents with nonviolent criminal histories a chance to limit public access to parts of their record.
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Indiana State Fair tragedy renews cap debate

October 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Indiana attorneys and legislators are embarking on a broader discussion about the state’s current tort claim cap and whether that decades-old limit is adequate to address the scope of this situation.
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Legislative study committee to discuss UPL

October 10, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Probate Code Study Commission, which meets for the first time this year on Wednesday, will focus on three items at its meeting, including the unauthorized practice of law.
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Court commission OKs new judicial officer requests

September 16, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Commission on Courts held its final meeting on Thursday, voting in support of new judicial officers for a handful of Indiana counties and agreeing to send those recommendations on to state lawmakers for consideration.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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