Indiana Lawyer Staff

7th Circuit rules on police chase violations

May 21, 2007
Jennifer Nelson
Police chases do not violate the Fourth and 14th Amendments when the officers involved do not intentionally and forcibly halt the fleeing subject, according to a ruling today by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.
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ACLU wants SCOTUS to hear Indiana voter ID case

May 17, 2007
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States is now being asked to weigh in on Indiana's two-year-old voter identification law.
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3 names for the governor

May 11, 2007
Michael Hoskins
It's now up to Gov. Mitch Daniels to decide who will be the next Indiana Court of Appeals judge.
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ACLU files federal suit against corrections center

April 27, 2007
Michael Hoskins
The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed a federal lawsuit this week against the Marion County Community Corrections Center in Indianapolis, alleging the facility's conditions violate the Constitution and threaten health and safety of inmates.
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7th Circuit shoots down Homeland Security decision

April 11, 2007
Michael Hoskins
he Department of Homeland Security wrongly second-guessed the federal labor department in denying an application by a mental health residential care group - Hoosier Care Inc. - asking for labor certification and immigrant visas for two Filipinos, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled today.
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7th Circuit rules in favor of Locke Reynolds

March 15, 2007
Indianapolis law firm Locke Reynolds has won an appeal in a case with a former paralegal who sued over allegations that she was fired because of her race.
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7th Circuit: Google v. Wikipedia citations

February 1, 2007
Michael Hoskins
Judges and appellate attorneys should feel free to include Google satellite photos in cases to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago.
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  1. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  2. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  3. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  4. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

  5. Oh yes, lifetime tenure. The Founders gave that to the federal judges .... at that time no federal district courts existed .... so we are talking the Supreme Court justices only in context ....so that they could rule against traditional marriage and for the other pet projects of the sixties generation. Right. Hmmmm, but I must admit, there is something from that time frame that seems to recommend itself in this context ..... on yes, from a document the Founders penned in 1776: " He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good."

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