Indiana State Bar Association

IndyBar: IndyBar, ISBA and IPA Paralegals Host Annual Joint Meeting

July 12, 2017
From IndyBar
The Indianapolis Bar Association Paralegal Committee, the Indiana Paralegal Association (IPA) and the Indiana State Bar Association (ISBA) Affiliate Committee came together on May 24, 2017 for their annual joint meeting.
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For lawyers, competency issues differ based on age

June 28, 2017
Olivia Covington
When a group of Indiana lawyers was asked who had ever faced age-related discrimination at work, whether for being too young or too old, nearly half the hands in the room went up.
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New ISBA online attorney directory aims to help public find lawyers

June 15, 2017
IL Staff
In an effort to encourage members of the public to hire professional legal assistance rather than tackling their legal issues alone, the Indiana State Bar Association has launched a new electronic attorney directory, known as “You Need a Lawyer: ISBA Directory.”
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ABA president touts resources for Indiana solo, small firms

June 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
President Linda Klein also encouraged advocacy for legal aide services while at the Indiana State Bar Association Solo and Small Firm Conference.
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Attorneys encouraged to practice ‘active relaxation’ outside work

June 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
After a long day of briefs, arguments and client meetings, attorneys might be tempted to go home and relax on the couch. But according to mental health experts, spending evenings in front of the television might not be that relaxing for those who want to fully escape the pressures of work.
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‘Sunrise CLEs’ discuss changing gender markers, avoiding copyright infringement

June 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though the majority of the Indiana State Bar Association’s Solo and Small Firm Conference was filled with experts in various legal fields sharing their in-depth knowledge, conference attendees also had the opportunity to learn a little bit Saturday morning during the conference’s shorter “Sunrise CLE” sessions.
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ISBA session offers tips in dealing with parents of a child with disabilities

June 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though judges are generally thought to be the gatekeepers of the law, in family law situations, parents may try to guard the gates of access to their children.
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New Orleans attorney offers solo and small firms ‘keys’ to better online presence

June 5, 2017
Olivia Covington
There is a clear solution for lawyers who want to recruit better clients – improve your online communications strategy.
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Sexism, ageism focus of small, solo conference session

June 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though outward expressions of discrimination against certain types of attorneys in court may have diminished over the years, each attorney, litigant, juror and judge who enters a courtroom brings with them their own set of implicit biases.
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ABA president addresses ISBA solo, small firm conference

June 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
The legal industry is evolving quickly, with technological advancements and societal shifts making the traditional paper-and-pencil model of practicing law nearly obsolete. But for solo and small firm attorneys, the administrative burdens of simply running their firms can significantly eat into the time they would otherwise devote to developing new and more efficient methods of doing their work.
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Putting technology into practice

April 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
The ISBA’s new law practice management coordinator wants to help solo and small firms stay competitive in today’s market.
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Indiana State Bar Association seeks servant leader

April 5, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The coming vacancy in the Indiana State Bar Association’s executive director position has attracted national attention with more than 50 applications submitted even though the job opening was only posted about a month ago.
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IndyBar: Indiana Bar Examination Assessment Task Force Releases Report

February 22, 2017
From IndyBar
The Indiana Bar Examination Assessment Task Force has completed its 18-month study and issued its 82-page report.
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ISBA begins search for next executive director

February 10, 2017
IL Staff
Leaders of the Indiana State Bar Association are beginning the process of finding a new executive director.
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ABA president to speak at ISBA Small, Solo Conference

January 25, 2017
IL Staff
American Bar Association President Linda A. Klein has been confirmed at the keynote speaker for the Indiana State Bar Association’s Solo and Small Firm Conference in June, the ISBA announced Wednesday.
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Pyrz begins his last year leading Indiana State Bar Association

January 11, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Thomas Pyrz, who has led the ISBA since Nov. 22, 1992, plans to retire at the end of 2017. His nearly 25-year tenure has included hiring additional staff, launching new programs, and increasing the value of membership to counter attorneys’ shifting view of the association.
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Program offers free legal assistance on King holiday

January 9, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana State Bar Association will again be honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by sponsoring the 2017 “Talk to a Lawyer Today” program Jan. 16 at sites all across the state.
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ISBA poll shows strong support for COA judges’ retention

October 5, 2016
IL Staff
A recently completed poll of Indiana State Bar Association members shows strong support for the four Indiana Court of Appeals judges seeking retention in the Nov. 8 general election.
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ISBA House of Delegates rejects proposal for non-lawyer ownership of law firms

October 5, 2016
Olivia Covington
After a 30-minute discussion about the potential ramifications of a recommendation to allow non-lawyers to hold equity investments in law firms, the Indiana State Bar Association House of Delegates overwhelming voted against the recommendation at its meeting Sept. 30.
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ISBA program aims for binding arbitration of disputes over legal billing

October 5, 2016
Dave Stafford
Clients who think their lawyer charged them too much have a new way to contest the bill. And so do attorneys whose clients haven’t paid up as they believe they should.
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ISBA panel says a confession is not always true

October 5, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
The conviction of Brendan Dassey, the Wisconsin teenager whose admission of guilt and subsequent trial for murder were part of the docuseries “Making a Murderer,” has brought fresh attention to the fact that innocent people do confess to crimes they did not commit
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‘Making a Murderer’ attorney speaks at ISBA dinner

October 5, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorney Jerry Buting’s popularity was on display during the Indiana State Bar Association annual meeting when he held the attention of his audience for 60 full minutes and then was kept around for almost another hour, answering attorneys’ questions and gamely posing for photos.
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ISBA director Pyrz announces retirement

October 4, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Thomas Pyrz, longtime executive director of the Indiana State Bar Association, has announced his intention to retire at the end of 2017 after 25 years at the helm.
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Social media create potential for ethical violations

October 3, 2016
Olivia Covington
As social media continue to evolve, legal professionals should become increasingly cautious when they log in to various sites.
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ISBA House of Delegates rejects non-lawyer equity investments

September 30, 2016
Olivia Covington
The Indiana State Bar Association House of Delegates on Friday overwhelmingly rejected a recommendation to allow non-lawyer equity investments in law firms, saying that the issue needed further study.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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