Intellectual Property

SCOTUS rules against Indiana farmer in seed patent case

May 13, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A unanimous Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that patent exhaustion doesn’t allow a farmer to reproduce patented seeds through planting and harvesting without the patent holder’s permission.
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First-Inventor-to-File system creates uncertainty

April 10, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The historic change in the patent system puts U.S. in step with other industrialized countries.
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Bottling up generics

April 10, 2013
Dave Stafford
The Supreme Court of the United States recently heard a government challenge of drugmakers' "pay to delay" practice.
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Legal fight fuels tensions in tight-knit tech world

January 16, 2013
Chris O'Malley
A trademark-infringement case brought against App Press LLC threatens to smother the tech startup in legal fees before it reaches its potential. And in a curious twist, the case also has generated grumblings in the tightknit developer community toward a big law firm that is representing App Press’ opponent in the federal court case.
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SCOTUS to hear Indiana farmer’s case against Monsanto in February

January 7, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A patent infringement case involving a Knox County soybean farmer and an international seed producer will be argued Feb. 19 before the Supreme Court of the United States.
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IU professor helps get pesky scrivener’s error removed from Trademark Act

December 4, 2012
IL Staff
One pesky scrivener’s error that altered the protection provided by the Trademark Dilution Revision Act of 2006 has been corrected thanks to the efforts of an Indiana University professor.
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SCOTUS decision on seed use may affect farming practices

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The doctrine of patent exhaustion is at the center of a Knox County dispute involving Monsanto Technology over the use of seeds.
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Indiana farmer’s tangle with seed producer over patent infringement gets SCOTUS review

October 8, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The Supreme Court of the United States has agreed to review a federal appeals court decision regarding patent infringement in a case involving an Indiana farmer and a seed producer.
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Marilyn Monroe decision points to right of publicity's shortcomings

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
The legal landscape for Marilyn Monroe’s heirs changed considerably when a federal court recently affirmed that the idol had no right of publicity that survived her.
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New provisions shine light on patent process

September 26, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
One addition under the America Invents Act is the public has the opportunity to participate in pre- and post-grant reviews.
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Fishers company loses Marilyn Monroe court appeal

August 31, 2012
IBJ Staff
CMG Worldwide, an intellectual property licensing firm in Fishers, has lost a federal court appeal related to ownership of iconic images of Marilyn Monroe.
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Terms of Art: Musical background helps attorney connect with clients

August 15, 2012
Wandini Riggins
Wandini Riggins writes about attorney Trezanay Atikins, whose interests in music and sports led to her launching her own intellectual property firm.
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NDLS clinic to participate in patent law pilot project

July 24, 2012
IL Staff
The Notre Dame Law School’s Intellectual Property and Entrepreneur Clinic has been selected by the United States Patent and Trademark Office to take part in the agency’s Patent Law School Clinic Certification Pilot Program beginning this fall.
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'Hologram' performance by Tupac creates legal questions for IP lawyers

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Fans raved about the "hologram" Tupac Shakur's performance at Coachella. For intellectual property lawyers, Tupac’s virtual return to the stage raises some interesting questions.
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U.S. Copyright Office counsel to speak at IU Maurer

April 6, 2012
IL Staff
A senior-level attorney for the United States Copyright Office will deliver a public talk on April 9 at Indiana University Maurer School of Law.
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Starting an IP practiceRestricted Content

March 28, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Patent attorneys face unique concerns in creating firms.
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Legal briefs raise copyright questions

March 28, 2012
Michael Hoskins
A New York federal suit challenges publishers' selling of attorneys' work.
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On watch for scams

February 29, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Attorneys see a rise in the amount of fraudulent notices clients receive.
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Symposium to examine America Invents Act

November 29, 2011
IL Staff
The Intellectual Property Law and Innovation Symposium at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis on Dec. 2 will focus on recent changes to IP law created by the America Invents Act.
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Notre Dame to launch IP clinic

November 21, 2011
IL Staff
The Notre Dame Legal Clinics are expanding their transactional services to the local business community in January with a new Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic headed by intellectual property lawyer Jodi Clifford, who joined the law school this fall.
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Man pleads guilty to espionage, theft

October 18, 2011
IL Staff
A Chinese national and former employee of Dow AgroSciences LLC pleaded guilty Tuesday to economic espionage and theft of trade secrets in federal court. Kexue Huang’s case is the first prosecution in Indiana for foreign economic espionage.
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U.S. sees most significant patent reform in decades

October 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Some Indiana attorneys think this new first-to-file process will create a race to the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office in order to obtain patent protection first.
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Pros, cons of changes in domain namingRestricted Content

October 12, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Patent attorneys wonder who will benefit from new process.
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Lilly lawyer is leader in patent reform

October 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Robert Armitage nears 40 years of practicing IP-focused law.
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Justices take certified questions

October 5, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has accepted three certified questions stemming from a case in the Southern District of Indiana.
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  1. The fee increase would be livable except for the 11% increase in spending at the Disciplinary Commission. The Commission should be focused on true public harm rather than going on witch hunts against lawyers who dare to criticize judges.

  2. Marijuana is safer than alcohol. AT the time the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act was enacted all major pharmaceutical companies in the US sold marijuana products. 11 Presidents of the US have smoked marijuana. Smoking it does not increase the likelihood that you will get lung cancer. There are numerous reports of canabis oil killing many kinds of incurable cancer. (See Rick Simpson's Oil on the internet or facebook).

  3. The US has 5% of the world's population and 25% of the world's prisoners. Far too many people are sentenced for far too many years in prison. Many of the federal prisoners are sentenced for marijuana violations. Marijuana is safer than alcohol.

  4. My daughter was married less than a week and her new hubbys picture was on tv for drugs and now I havent't seen my granddaughters since st patricks day. when my daughter left her marriage from her childrens Father she lived with me with my grand daughters and that was ok but I called her on the new hubby who is in jail and said didn't want this around my grandkids not unreasonable request and I get shut out for her mistake

  5. From the perspective of a practicing attorney, it sounds like this masters degree in law for non-attorneys will be useless to anyone who gets it. "However, Ted Waggoner, chair of the ISBA’s Legal Education Conclave, sees the potential for the degree program to actually help attorneys do their jobs better. He pointed to his practice at Peterson Waggoner & Perkins LLP in Rochester and how some clients ask their attorneys to do work, such as filling out insurance forms, that they could do themselves. Waggoner believes the individuals with the legal master’s degrees could do the routine, mundane business thus freeing the lawyers to do the substantive legal work." That is simply insulting to suggest that someone with a masters degree would work in a role that is subpar to even an administrative assistant. Even someone with just a certificate or associate's degree in paralegal studies would be overqualified to sit around helping clients fill out forms. Anyone who has a business background that they think would be enhanced by having a legal background will just go to law school, or get an MBA (which typically includes a business law class that gives a generic, broad overview of legal concepts). No business-savvy person would ever seriously consider this ridiculous master of law for non-lawyers degree. It reeks of desperation. The only people I see getting it are the ones who did not get into law school, who see the degree as something to add to their transcript in hopes of getting into a JD program down the road.

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