Intellectual Property

Judge tosses one of two stent patent suits against Cook Medical

August 7, 2013
Dave Stafford
A federal judge Wednesday dismissed a patent dispute case against Cook Medical Inc. of Bloomington, but a Texas corporation continues to press its claim that the device maker infringed its patents on blood vessel stents and grafts.
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Large 'pay-to-delay' payments may become history after U.S. Supreme Court ruling

June 17, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A decision handed down by the Supreme Court of the United States Monday could end the practice of pharmaceutical companies paying competitors very large sums to keep their generics off the market.
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SCOTUS rules on Myriad BRCA1, BRCA2 patent case

June 13, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A naturally occurring DNA segment is not eligible for a patent simply because it has been isolated, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled Thursday. DNA that is not a product of nature may be patent eligible, however.
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Faegre Baker Daniels to open office in Silicon Valley

June 6, 2013
IL Staff
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP is heading to California to open an office in Silicon Valley.
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Lawsuit threatens NCAA's amateur business model

May 22, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
The NCAA is facing a potential game-changing legal battle that has some colleges worrying their athletic budgets could be halved.
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Supreme Court’s ruling for Monsanto described as good decision

May 22, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The Supreme Court of the United States decision upholding the patent owned by Monsanto Co. was surprising only in its unanimous affirmation.
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SCOTUS rules against Indiana farmer in seed patent case

May 13, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A unanimous Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that patent exhaustion doesn’t allow a farmer to reproduce patented seeds through planting and harvesting without the patent holder’s permission.
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First-Inventor-to-File system creates uncertainty

April 10, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The historic change in the patent system puts U.S. in step with other industrialized countries.
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Bottling up generics

April 10, 2013
Dave Stafford
The Supreme Court of the United States recently heard a government challenge of drugmakers' "pay to delay" practice.
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Legal fight fuels tensions in tight-knit tech world

January 16, 2013
Chris O'Malley
A trademark-infringement case brought against App Press LLC threatens to smother the tech startup in legal fees before it reaches its potential. And in a curious twist, the case also has generated grumblings in the tightknit developer community toward a big law firm that is representing App Press’ opponent in the federal court case.
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SCOTUS to hear Indiana farmer’s case against Monsanto in February

January 7, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A patent infringement case involving a Knox County soybean farmer and an international seed producer will be argued Feb. 19 before the Supreme Court of the United States.
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IU professor helps get pesky scrivener’s error removed from Trademark Act

December 4, 2012
IL Staff
One pesky scrivener’s error that altered the protection provided by the Trademark Dilution Revision Act of 2006 has been corrected thanks to the efforts of an Indiana University professor.
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SCOTUS decision on seed use may affect farming practices

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The doctrine of patent exhaustion is at the center of a Knox County dispute involving Monsanto Technology over the use of seeds.
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Indiana farmer’s tangle with seed producer over patent infringement gets SCOTUS review

October 8, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The Supreme Court of the United States has agreed to review a federal appeals court decision regarding patent infringement in a case involving an Indiana farmer and a seed producer.
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Marilyn Monroe decision points to right of publicity's shortcomings

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
The legal landscape for Marilyn Monroe’s heirs changed considerably when a federal court recently affirmed that the idol had no right of publicity that survived her.
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New provisions shine light on patent process

September 26, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
One addition under the America Invents Act is the public has the opportunity to participate in pre- and post-grant reviews.
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Fishers company loses Marilyn Monroe court appeal

August 31, 2012
IBJ Staff
CMG Worldwide, an intellectual property licensing firm in Fishers, has lost a federal court appeal related to ownership of iconic images of Marilyn Monroe.
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Terms of Art: Musical background helps attorney connect with clients

August 15, 2012
Wandini Riggins
Wandini Riggins writes about attorney Trezanay Atikins, whose interests in music and sports led to her launching her own intellectual property firm.
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NDLS clinic to participate in patent law pilot project

July 24, 2012
IL Staff
The Notre Dame Law School’s Intellectual Property and Entrepreneur Clinic has been selected by the United States Patent and Trademark Office to take part in the agency’s Patent Law School Clinic Certification Pilot Program beginning this fall.
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'Hologram' performance by Tupac creates legal questions for IP lawyers

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Fans raved about the "hologram" Tupac Shakur's performance at Coachella. For intellectual property lawyers, Tupac’s virtual return to the stage raises some interesting questions.
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U.S. Copyright Office counsel to speak at IU Maurer

April 6, 2012
IL Staff
A senior-level attorney for the United States Copyright Office will deliver a public talk on April 9 at Indiana University Maurer School of Law.
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Starting an IP practiceRestricted Content

March 28, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Patent attorneys face unique concerns in creating firms.
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Legal briefs raise copyright questions

March 28, 2012
Michael Hoskins
A New York federal suit challenges publishers' selling of attorneys' work.
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On watch for scams

February 29, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Attorneys see a rise in the amount of fraudulent notices clients receive.
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Symposium to examine America Invents Act

November 29, 2011
IL Staff
The Intellectual Property Law and Innovation Symposium at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis on Dec. 2 will focus on recent changes to IP law created by the America Invents Act.
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