International connections

Judges order new trial for woman who withdrew, deposited cash from ATMs

March 20, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
In a split decision from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, the majority reversed a Russian woman’s conviction for violating a federal statute that prohibits structuring currency transactions in order to evade federal reporting requirements for transactions involving more than $10,000 in currency. The majority cited the prosecution’s questioning of the woman about past financial records as the reason for reversal.
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McKinney professor Arafa says law students in his native Egypt are helping to guide nation’s future

September 11, 2013
Mohamed Arafa recalls the day last month when he left Cairo, Egypt, to return to his adjunct professor post at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. The streets in the capitol of his native land were full of people demonstrating, and it took four hours in a taxi to navigate to the airport. “Today we have two presidents on trial,” Arafa said of the day he departed Cairo.
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AG’s video conferences train Mexican prosecutors

July 10, 2012
IL Staff
About 50 prosecutors in Mexico are learning about the American legal system through video conferences this week arranged by the Indiana attorney general’s office.
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Changing world inspires law school program

April 25, 2012
Holly Wheeler
The recently announced dual degree J.D./LL.B. program by the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Jindal Global Law School in India is still in the planning stages, but to many legal professors and professionals, the program promises to be a boon for students interested in practicing international law.
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International students to discuss legal systems of home countries

April 10, 2012
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will hold its inaugural International Student Speakers Series on Thursday, when students and alumni from China, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Taiwan, Egypt and Germany will talk about law in their home countries.
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Nobel prize recipient to speak in Indianapolis

January 16, 2012
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will host a lecture by Leymah Gbowee, joint recipient of the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize, on Feb. 16.
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Immigrant students receive diverted sentences

June 15, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
On June 14, five undocumented immigrant students received diverted sentences for criminal trespass charges stemming from an incident in May in Gov. Mitch Daniels' office.
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Law school program set to earn special status with United Nations

June 7, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The United Nations has recommended a program at Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis for "Special Consultative Status" to the U.N., which would allow its students and faculty to engage in treaty negotiation sessions. The Program in International Human Rights Law learned of the honor on May 18.
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Race for LACE supports Kenyan Legal Aid Clinic

March 16, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
A few years after several Indianapolis judges and attorneys helped form a legal aid clinic in western Kenya, that clinic is thriving. Indiana Court of Appeals Judge Patricia Riley, a co-founder of the Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret, traveled there earlier this year to see progress being.
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Professor to study India's legal system

August 20, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Over the next three years, a professor at an Indiana law school will be working on a study of India’s trial courts as part of a $261,000 grant from the Ford Foundation to a non-governmental association based in India.
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  1. The fee increase would be livable except for the 11% increase in spending at the Disciplinary Commission. The Commission should be focused on true public harm rather than going on witch hunts against lawyers who dare to criticize judges.

  2. Marijuana is safer than alcohol. AT the time the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act was enacted all major pharmaceutical companies in the US sold marijuana products. 11 Presidents of the US have smoked marijuana. Smoking it does not increase the likelihood that you will get lung cancer. There are numerous reports of canabis oil killing many kinds of incurable cancer. (See Rick Simpson's Oil on the internet or facebook).

  3. The US has 5% of the world's population and 25% of the world's prisoners. Far too many people are sentenced for far too many years in prison. Many of the federal prisoners are sentenced for marijuana violations. Marijuana is safer than alcohol.

  4. My daughter was married less than a week and her new hubbys picture was on tv for drugs and now I havent't seen my granddaughters since st patricks day. when my daughter left her marriage from her childrens Father she lived with me with my grand daughters and that was ok but I called her on the new hubby who is in jail and said didn't want this around my grandkids not unreasonable request and I get shut out for her mistake

  5. From the perspective of a practicing attorney, it sounds like this masters degree in law for non-attorneys will be useless to anyone who gets it. "However, Ted Waggoner, chair of the ISBA’s Legal Education Conclave, sees the potential for the degree program to actually help attorneys do their jobs better. He pointed to his practice at Peterson Waggoner & Perkins LLP in Rochester and how some clients ask their attorneys to do work, such as filling out insurance forms, that they could do themselves. Waggoner believes the individuals with the legal master’s degrees could do the routine, mundane business thus freeing the lawyers to do the substantive legal work." That is simply insulting to suggest that someone with a masters degree would work in a role that is subpar to even an administrative assistant. Even someone with just a certificate or associate's degree in paralegal studies would be overqualified to sit around helping clients fill out forms. Anyone who has a business background that they think would be enhanced by having a legal background will just go to law school, or get an MBA (which typically includes a business law class that gives a generic, broad overview of legal concepts). No business-savvy person would ever seriously consider this ridiculous master of law for non-lawyers degree. It reeks of desperation. The only people I see getting it are the ones who did not get into law school, who see the degree as something to add to their transcript in hopes of getting into a JD program down the road.

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