Judicial Technology and Automation Committee

Statewide case management system is a third of the way plugged in

January 19, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Three years in, and Indiana’s case management system is plugged into about one-third of the state’s courts.
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JTAC fee, court-reporter licensing bills proposed

January 6, 2011
IL Staff
Court reporters would need licenses, there would be more money to implement the statewide case management system in trial courts, and convicted sex offenders would be banned from public libraries if these bills introduced this session become law.
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General Assembly ready for new session's business

November 24, 2010
Michael Hoskins
With a new legislative session on the horizon, the Indiana General Assembly is going to be one to watch as it likely tackles a multitude of issues influencing the state’s legal community.
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Justice: Fee hike could mean statewide case management system by 2017

August 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
If lawmakers during the next legislative session increase a statewide court fee an extra $3, Indiana Supreme Court Justice Frank Sullivan believes the state can fully implement a case management system in all county courts by June 30, 2017.
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Benton, Carroll counties on Odyssey

May 3, 2010
IL Staff
The courts in Benton and Carroll counties have joined nearly 50 other courts in the state using the Indiana Supreme Court Odyssey Case Management System. The courts and clerk’s offices in those counties went online Friday.
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Rush County courts join Odyssey

February 19, 2010
IL Staff
The Rush Superior and Circuit Courts and clerk's office have gone online on Odyssey, the Indiana Supreme Court's case management system.
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2 counties join Odyssey CMS

January 29, 2010
IL Staff
Blackford and Huntington counties'; courts and clerks'; offices are the latest to join the Indiana Supreme Court's Odyssey case management system.
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Hamilton County to start using Odyssey

October 12, 2009
IL Staff
Hamilton County will join nearly 40 other courts and 13 counties when it begins using Odyssey, a statewide case management system provided by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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E-Ticket program wins 2 awards

September 30, 2009
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court's electronic ticketing program has won awards from two safety associations.
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Justice praises court-technology support

September 24, 2009
IL Staff
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Frank Sullivan Jr. praised Gov. Mitch Daniels' administration's support for improved court technology during a speech Wednesday in Denver. Justice Sullivan addressed a plenary session at the National Court Technology Conference, which is sponsored by the National Center for State Courts.
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100th agency uses e-Ticketing

June 4, 2009
IL Staff
The LaPorte County Sheriff's Office has become the 100th law enforcement agency to use the Indiana Supreme Court's electronic Citation and Warning System. The e-Ticket system will be demonstrated June 8; Supreme Court Justice Frank Sullivan Jr. will be on hand with others to demonstrate the system and answer questions.
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Statewide system debuts in City Court

May 13, 2009
Michael Hoskins
Greenwood City Court is the state's first city or town court to start using a tool that will eventually connect all of Indiana courts' case management systems.
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Supreme Court recognized for tech initiatives

November 6, 2008
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has received an honorable mention in an international awards competition for its work on major technology initiatives, the court announced today.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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