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Jasper County judge moving to federal bench

May 19, 2017
IL Staff
A Jasper County judge has been appointed to the bench in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Indiana.
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Man's companion entitled to compensation for services, COA rules

May 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
An Indiana probate court correctly allowed a woman’s partial claim for compensation for 14 years of household and medical services to a man she considered a “loving companion,” the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday, finding the woman had rebutted the presumption her services were gratuitous.
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Ex-Evansville police officer convicted of murder appeals to US Supreme Court

May 19, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A former Evansville police officer serving an 80-year sentence for murder and arson has asked the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn his conviction and order a new trial.
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COA reverses forfeiture against drug offender

May 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
The state must return funds seized from a man convicted of possession of marijuana after the Indiana Court of Appeals found no proof linking the cash to any drug crimes.
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7th Circuit orders Lilly to reinstate ex-employee’s disability benefits

May 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
Eli Lilly and Co. must reinstate disability benefits to its former human resources director after a divided 7th Circuit Court of Appeals found insufficient evidence to support the company’s argument that the former director could still work despite her fibromyalgia symptoms.
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Supreme Court reprimands attorney for falsifying hours worked

May 19, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has publicly reprimand an Indianapolis attorney accused of falsifying the time he spent working on cases in official claims for attorney fees.
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Appeal: Commercial court, without notice, idled worker

May 18, 2017
Dave Stafford
One of the first appeals from an Indiana Commercial Court alleges the specialized docket touted as a speedier, more efficient means of resolving complex business disputes operated in secret to keep a glass-industry engineer out of a job in his profession for a year.
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Justices weigh whether negligent hiring claim allowed against Pizza Hut

May 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
In its first oral arguments as a temporarily four-person bench, the Indiana Supreme Court considered Thursday whether the plaintiff in a wrongful death case can bring employment-based claims against an employer if the employer has admitted the employee involved in the death was acting in the scope of their employment.
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While Comey memo could be key, any Trump prosecution tricky

May 18, 2017
 Associated Press
A memo detailing President Donald Trump's request to shut down an FBI investigation of his ousted national security adviser is a powerful piece of evidence that could be used to build an obstruction of justice case against him.
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IDEM whistleblower makes argument to Indiana Supreme Court

May 18, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A former employee of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management appeared in the Indiana Supreme Court courtroom Thursday arguing her right to bring a complaint against the state under the whistleblower provision of the Indiana False Claims Act.
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Richard rule’ questioned during oral arguments in 4th Amendment case

May 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court is being asked to determine whether a ruling by the Indiana Court of Appeals that allows police to search a passenger in a car after a police dog alerts to drugs being in the vehicle goes too far.
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Judge dismisses claims against hospital in discovery dispute

May 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
A federal judge has dismissed a man’s claims in a complaint accusing the Indiana Supreme Court, a hospital and the chair of a medical review panel of violating his due process rights. The judge found that federal precedent and a failure to state a claim barred the man’s claims against the hospital.
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Planned Parenthood challenging new Indiana abortion parental consent law

May 18, 2017
IL Staff
Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky has filed a lawsuit challenging portions of Senate Enrolled Act 404, which in part requires unemancipated minors to obtain consent from a parent or legal guardian before being allowed to have an abortion.
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Gift jumpstarts Indiana Bar Foundation’s 2017 campaign

May 18, 2017
IL Staff
The largest Keystone Society donation ever made will again enable the Indiana Bar Foundation to provide a partial match to donations as part of the 2017 Keystone Society campaign.
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Whitestown suing wastewater utility for $2.5 million

May 17, 2017
Lindsey Erdody, Indianapolis Business Journal
A Boone County community is claiming the wastewater division of Citizens Energy Group owes it more than $2.5 million.
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New lawyers advised to remember the oath during their careers

May 17, 2017
Jennifer Nelson
Indiana’s newest lawyers were admitted to practice Wednesday at an Indianapolis ceremony where they were advised to “think like a lawyer” and remember the oath they have taken to support and defend the Constitution.
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57 percent of 2016 Indiana law graduates have full-time JD-required jobs

May 17, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A little more than half of the 2016 graduates of Indiana law schools have full-time, long-term jobs where bar passage is required, according to American Bar Association employment statistics.
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Indiana man could face life term in college student's death

May 17, 2017
 Associated Press
A southwestern Indiana man accused of fatally shooting his ex-girlfriend could face life in prison if he's convicted in her killing.
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Public defender accused of harassing ex-girlfriend suspended

May 17, 2017
Olivia Covington
A northern Indiana public defender accused of repeatedly harassing his ex-girlfriend has been suspended from the practice of law in Indiana for at least one year.
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Duke Energy plans to close coal ash ponds in Indiana

May 17, 2017
 Associated Press
Duke Energy is planning to close coal ash ponds in Indiana because of new federal environmental regulations.
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Women IP attorneys launch central Indiana chapter of ChIPS, one of first in Midwest

May 17, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
At a kickoff reception April 27, about 30 women came together to network and participate in a panel discussion examining the careers of women in IP. ChIPS co-founder Emily Ward, CEO of Calla Nava and alumnae of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, was the featured guest.
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With aid from legal community, juvenile dog-training effort offers many rewards

May 17, 2017
Dave Stafford
Superintendent Terrance Asante-Doyle has witnessed what happens when his charges at the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center get to offer obedience training to dogs from Indianapolis Animal Care, who, like them, are often victims of abuse, exploitation or neglect.
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Courier deliveries diminishing with e-filing

May 17, 2017
Dave Stafford
Courier services, once vital for law firms, are adapting to e-filing by offering different services.
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Judgment by algorithm

May 17, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Risk assessment tools are raising concerns about accuracy and constitutional violations.
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COA affirms 65-year sentence for man who killed officer

May 16, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Dearborn Circuit Court did not err in imposing a 65-year sentence on a man convicted of felony murder after he shot and killed a deputy sheriff in the line of duty, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Tuesday.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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