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Denial by justices to take prosecutorial misconduct case draws dissent

January 28, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
Believing that the Indiana Supreme Court should have taken a case involving the “disturbing trend” of alleged prosecutorial misconduct, two justices dissented from their colleagues' decision to not accept the case.
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Valparaiso Law Dean Andrea Lyon built a career battling the death penalty

January 28, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Lyon remains a passionate, unwavering opponent of capital punishment. Her career path has turned from the courtroom to education. The dean of Valparaiso University Law School maintains a strong connection to death penalty work.
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'Dead Man Walking' author calls for judicial reform

January 28, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Sister Helen Prejean, at a recent talk at Valparaiso University, called the death penalty process "unjust."
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Rush rolls out commercial court plan in State of Judiciary

January 28, 2015
Dave Stafford
Commercial courts heralded by Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush in her first State of the Judiciary address could be in business soon, with the first pilots launching as early as this summer, according to judges and lawyers involved in developing the plans.
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Changes being considered for medical malpractice claims

January 28, 2015
Dave Stafford
More medical malpractice cases could be filed directly in state trial courts without first having to go through the exhaustive and mandatory medical review process under legislation pending in the Indiana Senate. A proposal in the Indiana House of Representatives aims to raise the caps on damages and insurer liability.
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Bill to open adoption records moves forward

January 28, 2015
Dave Stafford
Indiana has nothing to fear from abandoning long-established practice and following the lead of numerous states in order to allow some 350,000 adopted Hoosiers access to their birth records, a leading national advocate said.
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Attorney reaction spurs tweaks of pro bono reporting rule

January 28, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
During a January lunchtime meeting of the Elkhart City Bar Association, attorneys served a plateful of questions about the state’s new mandatory pro bono reporting rule and ladled on some skepticism.
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Law firms see overhead costs shift during past 25 years

January 28, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
All the modern devices and technology used by law firms these days come at a high cost and are often among the top firm expenses, according to managing partners.
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House panel backs new rules after nursing home scandal

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press
An Indiana House committee has endorsed tighter rules on the conduct of lawmakers in the wake of an ethics investigation of a top Republican who fought privately to defeat legislation that would have hurt his family's business.
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‘Spice’ law void for vagueness, divided panels rule

January 27, 2015
Dave Stafford
Divided Court of Appeals panels found Indiana’s “spice” law void for vagueness in two separate cases Tuesday.
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Panel backs religion-based hiring by Indiana contractors

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press
An Indiana legislative panel has endorsed a bill allowing religious institutions that receive state and local government contracts to make hiring decisions based upon religion.
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Plea deal reached in central Indiana animal cruelty case

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press
A central Indiana couple charged with animal cruelty after 171 dead animals were found on their farm have pleaded guilty to four counts each of improper disposal of a dead animal.
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Kokomo sues state over proposed downtown baseball park

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press
The city of Kokomo is suing the state over its opposition to a proposed downtown baseball stadium.
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State union membership counters national trend

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press, IBJ Staff
Indiana bucked a national trend in 2014 by experiencing an increase in labor union membership, new statistics released by the U. S. Labor Department show.
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Lack of evidence allows periodontists to leave office space

January 26, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Having failed to produce sufficient evidence that the terms of a lease agreement had been waived, a landlord will have to allow a pair of tenants to vacate the property with no financial penalty.
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Mock trial volunteers needed

January 26, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana attorneys are being offered the opportunity to show off their judicial skills. The Indiana Bar Foundation is seeking lawyers to volunteer as judges during the 2015 Indiana High School Mock Trial Competition.
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Explosion case cemented Richmond attorney's reputation

January 26, 2015
 Associated Press
Kent Klinge learned the basics of law in school. But it was in a Connersville courtroom where he became a lawyer. Klinge, who was one of the top trial lawyers in Richmond for more than 25 years in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, retired from practice as a partner at Boston Bever Klinge Cross & Chidester in Richmond on Jan. 1 after a 47-year career.
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Supreme Court permanently bans Muncie judge

January 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
A Muncie judge who was previously suspended for 13 counts of judicial misconduct and for using racial slurs recorded on video has been given a lifetime ban from serving on the bench.
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7th Circuit affirms Michigan law applies to Visteon pollution claims

January 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
A federal court in Indianapolis properly dismissed a lawsuit Visteon Corp. filed against its insurer seeking to recover damages resulting from toxic pollution at its former Connersville plant that also contaminated neighboring properties.
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Severely injured worker allowed to make case to jury

January 23, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A man who sustained life-changing injuries from a workplace accident is entitled to have his day in court to present his claims to a jury, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled.
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Indiana Senate backs death penalty for beheading crimes

January 23, 2015
 Associated Press
A bill making intentionally decapitating someone a crime eligible for the death penalty has been approved by the Indiana Senate.
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Lake County Court in Hammond closed due to water main break

January 23, 2015
 Associated Press
A water main break has forced the closure of the Lake County Superior Court in downtown Hammond.
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Conviction, sentence affirmed for man who fatally shot cousin

January 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
The reckless homicide conviction and 12-year sentence given to an Indianapolis man who shot and killed his cousin as the two struggled for control of a revolver was affirmed Friday.
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Court affirms 3-year home detention for Class D felony

January 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
A man was properly sentenced to three years of home detention for conviction of Class D felony receiving stolen property, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday.
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Bill opening birth records passes Senate

January 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Senate Thursday approved a bill that would open birth records to some 350,000 Hoosiers adopted between 1941 and 1993.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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