Law Firms

DTCI: Summer associates: Find your 'Bill Wooden' mentor

July 6, 2011
Michael Rabinowitch
DTCI member Misha Rabinowitch reflects on his mentor, Bill Wooden.
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JLAP offers depression support for lawyers

June 22, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Dedication to clients, competitiveness, and a strong work ethic are qualities that many successful lawyers share. Those same traits may put attorneys at greater risk for major depression if they end up demanding more from themselves than they’re able to give.
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New lawyers face tough job market

June 22, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
In June, the National Association for Law Placement released key findings stating 2010 was the worst job market for law school graduates since the mid-1990s. For graduates whose employment was known, only 68.4 percent obtained jobs that required bar passage – the lowest number in that category since NALP began collecting data on law graduates in the early 1980s.
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Law firm managers plan for the worst

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Like other businesses, law firms know it is vital to be able to serve clients during times of disaster. Locally, many firms have begun developing or have revisited business continuity plans – particularly after 2006 when a strong storm whipped through downtown Indianapolis and shattered the windows in a high-rise building, displacing several law firms.
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Switching sides: defenders become plaintiffs' attorneys

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Bloomington attorney Mike Phelps was a successful defender for insurance companies for nine years.  But a personal injury case that he won on behalf of the defendant caused him to question whether he was ready for a change.
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Family law attorney dies after battle with cancer

June 8, 2011
IL Staff
Attorney Stephenie Sutliff Jocham, a founder of Carmel firm Jocham Harden Dimick Jackson, died June 2 following a battle with cancer.
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ISBA president opens new firm

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
After nearly 10 years working for a nationally known law firm in Terre Haute, Jeffry Lind, president of the Indiana State Bar Association, has opened his own practice.
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Family law attorney dies after battle with cancer

June 2, 2011
IL Staff
Attorney Stephenie Jocham, a founder of Carmel firm Jocham Harden Dimick Jackson, died Thursday morning following a battle with cancer, the firm announced.
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IU - Indy to host Summer Legal Institute

June 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson

Central Indiana students who have an interest in the law will get an up-close-and-personal look at it through an intensive summer program beginning June 6 at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis.

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Inspiration through loss

May 25, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Charity founders discuss the origins of their organizations - Kate Cares, Outrun the Sun, and the Joseph Maley Foundation.
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Diverse legal team brings diverse perspective

May 11, 2011
Kelly Lucas
Ask if it is important for law firms to comprise a diversified group of lawyers, and the answer will be a resounding “yes.” Mirroring society’s cultural mix, expanding the firm’s thought pool, and improving the ability of clients to identify with their lawyers are all reasons diversity makes good business sense.
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AG's food drive raises more than 140,000 pounds of food

May 5, 2011
IL Staff
Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller’s March Against Hunger challenge among law firms has raised the equivalent of nearly 144,000 pounds of food for needy Hoosiers.
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Bicycling barristers

April 27, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Lawyers say fitness and networking are among the perks of traveling to the office on two wheels.
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Green construction poses legal risks

April 27, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Standard contracts aren't adequate for this budding industry.
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Firm to offer free children's bike helmets at PedalPalooza

April 27, 2011
IL Staff
Staff from Parr Richey Obremskey Frandsen & Patterson will give away one boys bicycle, one girls bicycle, and will pass out bike reflectors and 100 free children’s bicycle helmets on April 30.
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Quayles create scholarship for Indy law school

April 26, 2011
IL Staff
Former Vice President Dan Quayle and his wife, Marilyn, have created a scholarship for students at Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis through an endowed gift of $200,000. The Quayles both earned their law degrees from the school in 1974.
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Attorneys discuss pros and cons of practicing in 2 states

April 13, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger, Jenny Montgomery
Attorneys in Indiana know that they must meet certain ongoing requirements to maintain their law licenses: CLE hours, and staying abreast of procedural changes. Why, then, would anyone want to be licensed in two states?
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New advertising rules irk some lawyers

April 13, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Bloomington attorney Ken Nunn says he hasn’t been hurt by new attorney advertising rules put in place at the start of the year, but he’s hearing more disturbing stories from people who are feeling the effects.
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Justice-turned-mediator: ADR does work

April 13, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When he was on the bench, former Indiana Supreme Court Justice Ted Boehm read a lot about alternative dispute resolution, and now that he's off the bench, he can see firsthand that it truly does work.
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Mediation firm champions comfort

April 13, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Mediation Option's attorneys say the laid-back atmosphere in the office distinguishes them from other mediators in Indiana.
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Attorney General’s food drive competition begins March 14

March 3, 2011
IL Staff
The third annual March Against Hunger food drive challenge among law firms and lawyers around the state kicks off March 14. The Indiana Attorney General’s Office is teaming up again with the Indiana State Bar Association and Feeding Indiana’s Hungry to encourage the legal community help needy Hoosiers.
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Attorney called to serve

March 2, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
As an attorney who was being deployed by the U.S. Navy Reserve to serve his country, there was no question that he would go. The support received from his firm for the year he was away made the experience manageable.
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Barnes & Thornburg opens Los Angeles office

February 25, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Indianapolis-based Barnes & Thornburg has expanded again, this time to the West Coast. A Los Angeles, Calif., office opened today with six attorneys from Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld.
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Lawyer couples

February 16, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger
While some couples prefer to keep their work and personal lives separate, it’s not unheard of for lawyers to pair up. Four couples shared their stories with Indiana Lawyer.
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Financing new energy creators

February 16, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When attorney John Kirkwood sees a garbage dump, his mind not only starts wandering toward the renewable energy that could be produced at that site but also an expanding field of law that’s drawing more lawyers into the environmental fold.
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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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