Law Firms

Lawyer stands behind his own rollover crash tests courts ruled inadmissible

April 5, 2017
Dave Stafford
New Albany attorney Dave Scott wanted to prove a point when he strapped himself behind the wheel of a 1999 Ford Explorer that was pushed down an embankment, violently rolling over multiple times. Just to be safe, he later buckled into another Explorer that again was sent careening roof over wheels, rolling three times.
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Eye on the Profession: Lawyer succession planning is easier said than done

April 5, 2017
John Trimble
It is fair to say that there may be no hotter topic in the legal world right now than succession planning.
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Supreme Court suspends attorney for mismanaging funds

March 30, 2017
IL Staff
An Indianapolis attorney accused of mismanaging trust funds for both himself and other attorneys and clients has been suspended from the practice of law in Indiana for 180 days.
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Kentucky lawyer pleads guilty in massive disability scheme

March 27, 2017
 Associated Press
A flamboyant Kentucky lawyer who billed himself as "Mr. Social Security" pleaded guilty Friday for his role in what prosecutors portrayed as a long-running scheme to defraud the government of nearly $600 million in federal disability payments.
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Slain Indiana lawyer remembered as scholarly local leader

March 23, 2017
Dave Stafford
Longtime Lebanon attorneys are remembering James P. Buchanan Sr. as a friendly, scholarly colleague who left his mark on the Boone County community.
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Cultivating the next generation

March 22, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorney Joseph Smith is among a new cadre of leaders stepping into management positions, taking a seat on high-level committees or becoming practice chairs in large law firms. Baby boomers are retiring or transitioning from their practices, creating openings in leadership roles.
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Hard line on immigration has Indiana attorneys scrambling

March 22, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Since President Donald Trump took office, lawyers are seeing more fear and more work from clients worried about deportation.
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Bill in Congress targets class actions

March 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
Trial lawyers contend the legislation would gut court access; defense attorneys say reforms are overdue.
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Overruling COA, justices decide Florida law group must face suit

March 21, 2017
Dave Stafford
A Florida law group that hired several Indiana attorneys to represent clients in foreclosures and bankruptcies must face a civil lawsuit, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.
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2 northern Indiana law firms rebuilding after fires

March 10, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Two northern Indiana law firms were destroyed by separate fires this past week, forcing attorneys to scramble to set up new offices and continue to serve clients.
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Use of contract attorneys rising in importance and stature

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Contract attorneys no longer wear a scarlet letter as many firms and legal companies utilize these lawyers for their expertise and to lower firm costs.
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Trustee prepares for next round in ITT bankruptcy

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Hiring of litigation firm Robins Kaplan indicates claims may be filed against the school’s leaders.
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Trustee prepares for next round in ITT bankruptcy

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Hiring of litigation firm Robins Kaplan indicates claims may be filed against the school’s leaders.
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Well-known lawyers choose new horizons after going solo

March 8, 2017
Dave Stafford
Don Lundberg and Mark Waterfill, for years well-known and well-regarded leaders in their practice areas at major Indianapolis law firms, have gone solo.
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Notre Dame, IU Maurer in top 50 for big law jobs

March 6, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A pair of Indiana law schools are among the top 50 institutions in sending graduates to work in the biggest law firms in the country.
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After rehearing, COA reaffirms judgment in favor of Barnes & Thornburg

March 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
After granting a rehearing to adopt a previous holding by the Indiana Supreme Court, the Indiana Court of Appeals Thursday reaffirmed a lower court’s grant of summary judgment in favor of Barnes & Thornburg LLP on a legal malpractice claim.
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Entry-level law firm recruitment slowing down

March 1, 2017
Olivia Covington
Entry-level law firm recruiting remained strong in 2016, though recent data suggests that law student recruitment for summer positions may have hit its peak in the post-recession economy.
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FBI lawyer sting rattles billion-dollar whistleblower unit

February 27, 2017
 Bloomberg News
The Justice Department offers secrecy and cash to whistleblowers for information about companies that cheated the government. But one former government attorney is accused of using that information for his own gain.
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ITT trustee hires ‘feared’ litigators

February 27, 2017
IL Staff
The Chapter 7 bankruptcy trustee for ITT Educational Services has hired “the most feared” litigators in the nation to help with investigating and prosecuting claims against the former directors and officers of the for-profit school.
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COA reverses judgment in favor of law firm in legal malpractice case

February 24, 2017
Olivia Covington
A legal malpractice case against a northern Indiana law firm will proceed after the Indiana Court of Appeals held Friday that there was a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the litigant’s original negligence claim would have succeeded but for the firm’s negligence.
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For some firms, splitting office space and expenses is best practice

February 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
For many firms, splitting office space and sharing resources is a strategy that makes good business sense. But such arrangements aren’t without challenges.
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Hispanic lawyers’ past experiences draw them to immigration law

February 22, 2017
Olivia Covington
Representing individual immigration litigants makes sense for many Hispanic attorneys because they have seen members of their own families move through the process of becoming either a legal citizen or lawful permanent resident of the United States.
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Lawmakers consider attorney anti-indemnification bill

February 22, 2017
Olivia Covington
A bill designed to prohibit attorneys from indemnifying themselves from legal malpractice claims is up for consideration by the Indiana House of Representatives, but some malpractice attorneys say the measure may not be necessary in light of existing rules of conduct.
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Attorneys trying to stay apprised, advise clients as Congress weighs health care reform

February 22, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The Affordable Care Act brought a sea change to the health care industry, and whatever replaces it is expected to bring another. Attorneys practicing health care law or with clients greatly impacted by the rules and regulations of the ACA are scrambling to stay afloat.
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Justices accept attorney’s resignation, suspend another

February 20, 2017
Olivia Covington
A northern Indiana attorney is no longer practicing law in the Hoosier state after the Indiana Supreme Court accepted his resignation from the Indiana bar last week.
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  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

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