Law Schools

March Against Hunger competition kicks off

March 1, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana State Bar Association is hosting its eighth annual March Against Hunger food drive competition beginning Tuesday and lasting through March 31. The drive raises food and monetary donations for Indiana’s 11 regional food banks.
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Valpo Law announces faculty buyouts, smaller future classes

February 26, 2016
Dave Stafford
Valparaiso University School of Law announced Friday afternoon it will offer buyouts to tenured faculty and faculty members with multi-year contracts.
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ABA push boosts Uniform Bar Exam

February 24, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
During the 2016 American Bar Association Midyear Meeting in early February, the House of Delegates passed a resolution encouraging states to adopt the Uniform Bar Examination. The test, administered by the National Conference of Bar Examiners, has already been adopted in 19 states and the District of Columbia.
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Legal education at what cost?

February 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
The economic storm of recent years was particularly perilous for the legal industry and law schools, but despite encouraging signs, former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard said the dangers have not passed.
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Steady increase in law firm recruiting continues

February 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
The last summer recruiting recycle for law graduates was the biggest since the recession, a report from the National Association for Law Placement found.
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IU McKinney student competes in Olympic trials

February 15, 2016
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law 3L Jordan Kyle competed this weekend at the U.S. Olympic marathon trials in Los Angeles in the hopes of representing the United States at the summer Olympics in Brazil.
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First fellowship symposium on consumer law Feb. 19 at IU McKinney

February 12, 2016
IL Staff
The inaugural Cohen & Malad LLP Consumer Law Fellowship Symposium will be held at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law Feb. 19. Third-year law student Justin McGiffen is the first student to participate in the fellowship created in 2013.
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IU students offer free tax assistance

February 11, 2016
IL Staff
Students with Indiana University Maurer School of Law and the Kelley School of Business will assist local taxpayers with free tax preparation help during February and March.
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From McKinney to mayor

February 10, 2016
Dave Stafford
Shane Evans went home to Delphi, Indiana, after graduating from law school last year and walked straight into the top job in city hall.
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IU McKinney teams with regional campuses for law scholars program

January 28, 2016
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has entered into an agreement with all five of IU’s regional campuses to create the Indiana University Regional Law Scholars program, the school announced Wednesday.
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New IU Maurer website targets millennials

January 27, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
With splashy photographs and abbreviated copy, Indiana University Maurer School of Law has completely revamped its Internet presence to try to get prospective students to take a breather from surfing other law schools’ websites and plunge deeper into what the Bloomington institution has to offer.
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ABA committee recommends Indiana Tech Law School for accreditation

January 26, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Tech Law School’s application for provisional accreditation has received support within the American Bar Association.
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Plaintiff in same-sex marriage case to speak at IU Maurer

January 26, 2016
IL Staff
Jim Obergefell, whose legal challenge to Ohio’s marriage laws led to the June 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision that gave same-sex couples the right to marry, will speak at two events next week at Indiana University, the school announced Tuesday.
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Henderson again named ‘most influential’ in legal education

January 21, 2016
IL Staff
For the second year in a row, Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor William Henderson has been named the most influential person in legal education by National Jurist magazine.
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Access Group’s acquisition of Lawyer Metrics may help law schools, firms align goals

January 13, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
With its acquisition by Access Group, Bloomington-based Lawyer Metrics will be positioned to apply its data analysis expertise, and possibly increase its role, in helping legal education and the profession as a whole navigate ongoing changes.
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Study: Future lawyers are hiding depression and drug and alcohol use

January 8, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Law students with addiction and mental health issues may be afraid to report the problems because they think that doing so would jeopardize their chances of being admitted to the bar or getting a good job after graduating, according to new study, which was conducted by a law professor, a dean of law students, and the programming director of a nonprofit focused on lawyers' mental health.
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IU McKinney teams up with Butler for law scholar program

January 7, 2016
IL Staff
Butler University has become the ninth college or university to partner with Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in creating a law scholar program for graduates of those institutions.
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Notre Dame to add tax clinic to curriculum

December 31, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Notre Dame Law School is preparing to launch a tax clinic to assist low-income and immigrant families in northern Indiana.
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Lender discrimination may be pushing black churches into bankruptcy

December 24, 2015
 Bloomberg News
A long line of research shows that black consumers pay higher rates for credit, including mortgages and car loans. A new study by an Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor suggests the same kind of financial discrimination may apply to black churches.
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Nonprofit acquires Maurer professor’s Lawyer Metrics

December 23, 2015
IL Staff
The Access Group, a nonprofit organization made up of law schools, has acquired the assets of Bloomington-based Lawyer Metrics LLC, which was co-founded by Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor William Henderson.
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Dean's Desk: McKinney students receive honors for pro bono service

December 16, 2015
Andrew Klein
At our most recent Pro Bono and Clinical Program awards event, we celebrated – for the second year in a row – the fact that our graduating class had contributed more than 20,000 hours of pro bono service to the community during their law school careers.
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Dean's Desk: New Wintersession offers learning, networking opportunities

November 18, 2015
Austen Parrish
This January – while other law schools’ students remain on winter break – our students will be diligently at work, honing their legal skills and knowledge in a fast-paced, weeklong program taught by leading lawyers and business executives from around the country.
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Murder exonoree to speak at IU McKinney

November 11, 2015
IL Staff
An Ohio man sentenced to death for the 1975 murder of a money-order salesman in Cleveland and later declared innocent in 2015 will speak at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law Friday.
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IU McKinney to discount tuition for some out-of-state residents

November 9, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law just got a little more affordable for residents of eight states.
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A growing advantage to the law school degree

November 4, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Well-documented changes in the legal profession since the economic recession are sending a small but growing number of law school graduates down a new career path toward companies that want employees with juris doctorates but do not involve the practice of law.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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