Legal News

Court must recalculate attorney fees

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A trial court has the discretion to determine whether and how much to award in attorney fees, but a Porter Superior Court incorrectly determined what attorney fees the prevailing party was entitled to in a slander of title action, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Friday.
More

Clause limiting time client can sue attorney violates public policy

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
The contract a client signed to have the Conour Law Firm represent her contained a clause limiting her ability to sue the firm to one year, which the Indiana Court of Appeals found violated public policy and the Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct. The lawsuit seeking to recover settlement funds stolen by William Conour continues against his former colleague.
More

Out-of-state move did not relieve sex offender from updating address

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals rejected a man’s claim that because he had moved out of state when law enforcement officials performed a random check of his home address, he was no longer required to register as a sex offender in Indiana.
More

Court affirms enhanced sentence for incest offense

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
Finding the District Court conducted the correct analysis when determining the sentence of a man who had failed to register as a sex offender in Indiana and then committed incest with his 18-year-old daughter, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the six-level sentencing enhancement.
More

LLC denied royalties because of unenforceable contract

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A company that sued seeking nearly $750 million in unpaid royalties for sales on medical devices using certain patents lost its appeal before the Indiana Court of Appeals because the contract is unenforceable.
More

E-filing to begin Monday in Indiana appeals courts

November 6, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
The e-filing pilot project that kicked off in Hamilton County in July will now include the Indiana Supreme Court and Court of Appeals. Chief Justice Loretta Rush signed an order Friday expanding the project to the appellate courts beginning Monday.
More

Judge OKs closed hearings in Bloomington man's murder trial

November 6, 2015
 Associated Press
A judge has decided a Bloomington man accused of killing an Indiana University student can seek additional public funds to hire experts and investigators for hearings closed to the prosecution and the public.
More

Woman heartbroken by lawsuit filed by Notre Dame student

November 6, 2015
 Associated Press
An academic coach fired by the University of Notre Dame after a student accused her of coercing him into having unwelcome sexual encounters with her daughter issued a statement Thursday describing what happened as merely a breakup and saying her family is heartbroken he chose to harm them in such a public manner.
More

Indiana man removed from sex offender registries in 2 states

November 6, 2015
 Associated Press
A 20-year-old Indiana man sentenced to two years' probation for having consensual sex with a 14-year-old Michigan girl who lied about her age has been taken off sex offender registries in both states, and his lawyer said he is seeking to modify some terms of his probation.
More

COA: Jury properly rejected defendant’s insanity defense

November 5, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
Because there was evidence that a defendant’s mental state at the time he stabbed his estranged wife was due to voluntary intoxication, the jury properly rejected his insanity defense, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Thursday.
More

COA upholds attempted stalking conviction

November 5, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A man who claims he is the only person in Indiana ever charged with or convicted of attempted stalking failed to convince the Indiana Court of Appeals that his conviction should be overturned.
More

Justices acquit mother involved in fistfight turned fatal

November 5, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court acquitted the woman involved in a planned beatdown that resulted in one man dying and she, her son and another man being convicted of attempted aggravated battery. The justices previously this year ordered the other two perpetrators’ convictions reversed and said the “basic principle of justice” requires the same result in the woman’s case.
More

Can an on-demand lawyer startup transform the legal business?

November 5, 2015
 Bloomberg News
John Suh is convinced that he can put lawyers back to work. In the past decade, the number of working lawyers has fallen by more than 50,000. Solo practitioners, the mom-and-pop shops of jurisprudence, have been in a death spiral for even longer.
More

Evansville asks US Supreme Court to review SWAT raid ruling

November 5, 2015
 Associated Press, IL Staff
The city of Evansville has asked the Supreme Court of the United States to review a federal appeals court's ruling in a lawsuit filed over a SWAT raid.
More

February trial for ex-Lake Station mayor, wife, stepdaughter

November 4, 2015
 Associated Press
A federal judge has postponed the public corruption trial of Lake Station's former mayor, his wife and stepdaughter.
More

States file additional challenge to EPA emissions power plant rule

November 4, 2015
IL Staff
The 23 states that are challenging a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s rule requiring existing power plants to reduce carbon dioxide admissions filed an additional legal challenge Tuesday challenging a similar rule related to new power plants.
More

IU, Purdue file amicus in university admissions case

November 4, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana University and Purdue University have joined with six public universities in filing an amicus brief in support of the University of Texas and its diversity-related admissions policies, which are being considered by the Supreme Court of the United States in Fisher v. University of Texas.
More

Redskins: US has registered plenty of 'offensive' trademarks

November 4, 2015
 Associated Press
As the Washington Redskins defend their federal trademark registration, they argue in court papers that the government has registered plenty of companies with offensive names.
More

Sweeping changes in HOA laws aim for dispute resolution and transparency

November 4, 2015
Dave Stafford
Condo conflicts and HOA hostilities can often result in lawsuits and sometimes incredulous headlines. Lawyers have seen disputes arise over everything from where bikes can be stored to whether a condo owner could install hardwood floors.
More

A growing advantage to the law school degree

November 4, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Well-documented changes in the legal profession since the economic recession are sending a small but growing number of law school graduates down a new career path toward companies that want employees with juris doctorates but do not involve the practice of law.
More

Anderson estate attorney's alleged thefts may top $500,000

November 4, 2015
Dave Stafford
Sarah Wilding wanted her church in Anderson to receive the bulk of her estate when she died in April 2012. The church is still waiting, and so are other beneficiaries who lost hundreds of thousands of dollars to a lawyer accused of plundering their estates.
More

Figuring out flat fees

November 4, 2015
Dave Stafford
A recent Indiana State Bar Association Legal Ethics Committee opinion says lawyers who charge clients flat fees considered earned on receipt shouldn’t deposit the fees in their Interest on Lawyer Trust Account, but should put the money in the firm’s operating account. Some lawyers aren’t convinced this makes sense.
More

IU honors law professor and former chancellor Gerald Bepko

November 3, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor and former dean Gerald Bepko has received one of the university’s highest honors for his service.
More

Supreme Court justices hint they may limit consumer lawsuits

November 3, 2015
 Bloomberg News
A divided Supreme Court of the United States indicated it may put limits on consumer lawsuits, questioning arguments by a man seeking to sue over what he says is an error-riddled Internet profile.
More

Federal jury to settle bitter battle between corn syrup, sugar

November 3, 2015
 Associated Press
Big Sugar and Big Corn face off in federal court in Los Angeles this week in a bitter, multibillion-dollar battle of sweeteners that boils down to a mix of science, semantics and marketing.
More
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  2. MELISA EVA VALUE INVESTMENT Greetings to you from Melisa Eva Value Investment. We offer Business and Personal loans, it is quick and easy and hence can be availed without any hassle. We do not ask for any collateral or guarantors while approving these loans and hence these loans require minimum documentation. We offer great and competitive interest rates of 2% which do not weigh you down too much. These loans have a comfortable pay-back period. Apply today by contacting us on E-mail: melisaeva9@gmail.com WE DO NOT ASK FOR AN UPFRONT FEE. BEWARE OF SCAMMERS AND ONLINE FRAUD.

  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

ADVERTISEMENT