Legal News

Notebook found in car falls under Fourth Amendment exception

July 2, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A notebook taken from a vehicle during an investigation of an identity-theft scheme was admissible at trial even though police did not have a search warrant, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled.
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Appeals court reverses denial of Fortville annexation

July 2, 2015
Dave Stafford
The town of Fortville’s effort to annex more than 600 acres was wrongly blocked by a trial court, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, sending the matter back for further proceedings.
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7th Circuit slams lawyer, sets new law on fees

July 2, 2015
Dave Stafford
An Indianapolis attorney who appealed a class-action lawsuit seeking a share of his clients’ compensation on top of a statutory award of fees was called out by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, which denied his appeal and affirmed the judgment of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Unambiguous contract means lower commission for employee

July 1, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals tossed a jury’s award of $1.5 million, finding the terms of the employee’s incentive plan were unambiguous and the trial was unnecessary.
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Divided justices deny State Fair stage collapse appeal

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
Victims who contested a settlement after the 2011 Indiana State Fair stage collapse failed to persuade a majority of Indiana Supreme Court justices to hear their appeal.
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COA upholds attorney’s criminal trespass conviction

July 1, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl

An attorney’s attempt to overturn his criminal trespass conviction by arguing the state statute is unconstitutional as applied to leased property was rejected by the Indiana Court of Appeals as failing to convince even a “person of ordinary intelligence."

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Woman convicted in baby’s death seeks visitation with daughter

July 1, 2015
 Associated Press
A northern Indiana woman who spent more than five years in prison for battering her infant who eventually died of the injuries has filed court document seeking visitation time with her other daughter.
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Indiana federal wiretaps plunge in 2014

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
Wiretaps authorized by federal judges in Indiana fell by 70 percent in 2014, according to court statistics released Wednesday.
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Kristine Bunch’s malicious prosecution suit stayed

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
A woman whose murder conviction was overturned after she spent 17 years in prison may proceed with a malicious prosecution lawsuit against fire officials she claims framed her, a federal judge ruled Monday.
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$6 million Indy jail fail

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
The city of Indianapolis spent more than $6 million on a justice center proposal that died last month on the floor of the City-County Council. Law firms collected nearly 80 percent of the total.
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Local efforts to limit Fourth of July festivities fizzle

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
Not everyone is having a blast over the explosion of fireworks use in Indiana in recent years. But local attempts so far to curb the concussions have bombed.
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MDL panel picks California for Anthem lawsuits

July 1, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indianapolis law firms that filed suit against the insurance giant after massive cyberbreach are surprised cases won’t be tried in Indiana
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Drawing the line regarding bystanders

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
A moped fatality case before the Indiana Supreme Court tests who may press negligent infliction of emotional distress claims.
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E-filing pilot begins in Indiana

July 1, 2015
Dave Stafford
Lawyers will have to file electronically in all Indiana state courts by the end of 2018, according to a plan overseen by Supreme Court Justice Steven David and Court of Appeals Judge Paul Mathias. Hamilton County will get the ball rolling in a few weeks.
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Evolving science helps link defendants to crime

July 1, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
St. Joseph County obtained its first conviction using DNA evidence in 1992.
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Most new Indiana laws effective July 1

July 1, 2015
IL Staff
Read about the new laws passed during the 2015 session.
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Project targets elderly in high-conflict families

July 1, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Steuben County is a test site for a new eldercaring coordination program.
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Privilege defense splits Court of Appeals

June 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A split Indiana Court of Appeals found the privilege granted to store owners and employees in making claims to police does have limits.
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Use tax on out-of-state vehicle purchases upheld

June 30, 2015
Dave Stafford
A tree service properly paid Indiana use tax on its commercial vehicle purchases made outside the state, and imposition of those taxes did not violate the Commerce Clause, the Indiana Tax Court ruled Tuesday.
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New laws on slowpoke drivers, rape charges taking effect

June 30, 2015
 Associated Press
The religious objections bill that sparked threats to boycott Indiana is the highest-profile state law taking effect Wednesday, but several dozen others also are officially going on the books.
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Former Ovation CFO arrested on multiple theft charges

June 30, 2015
Indianapolis Business Journal
The former chief financial officer for Ovation Audio-Video Solutions LLC has been arrested and charged with more than 20 counts of theft for allegedly misappropriating about $600,000 in company funds for his own use, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry announced Monday.
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Indy skyline photo copyright appeal not fully developed

June 30, 2015
Dave Stafford
A lawyer and photographer’s appeal in a copyright lawsuit over unlicensed use of his photo of the Indianapolis skyline was improper, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday, dismissing the appeal.
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Court ruling spurs backers' hopes for redistricting changes

June 30, 2015
 Associated Press
Groups trying to curb the partisan sculpting of U.S. House of Representative districts are hoping their Supreme Court of the United States victory will prompt more states to create independent commissions to redraw congressional lines.
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Judge won't rule on venue change until jury selection

June 30, 2015
 Associated Press
A judge says she'll wait until jury selection to decide whether to move the trial of a Bloomington man charged with murder in the fatal beating of an Indiana University student.
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Homeowners meet criteria for adverse possession of disputed property

June 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A church that challenged those who, it believed, trespassed failed to convince the Indiana Supreme Court that a disputed strip of land was actually part of its property.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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