Marion County Criminal Justice Complex

Marion County justice center debate proves divisive

April 22, 2015
Dave Stafford
Nearly a year-and-a-half after Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, Marion County Sheriff John Layton and other community leaders laid out a vision for an Indianapolis criminal justice center, its future is clouded as late opposition resulted in a major setback to the plan.
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City will push criminal justice center proposal at next council meeting

April 21, 2015
Dave Stafford
The proposed Indianapolis criminal justice center plan was not placed on the agenda of Monday’s City-County Council meeting, but Mayor Greg Ballard will seek to gather votes to pass the divisive 35-year private-public partnership next month. Ballard’s statement drew a rebuke from council chairwoman Maggie A. Lewis.
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Councilors allegedly offered millions in projects for justice center votes

April 15, 2015
Dave Stafford
Indianapolis City-County Council Chief Financial Officer Bart Brown said councilors have told him they’ve been offered up to $50 million in projects spread among five districts if they vote to approve the proposed $1.6 billion criminal justice complex.
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Council committee shoots down plan for Indy justice center

April 15, 2015
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
Mayor Greg Ballard's $1.6 billion justice center project suffered what could be a fatal blow in an Indianapolis City-County Council committee Tuesday night.
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Justice Center needs additional bid process for key offices

April 10, 2015
Dave Stafford
The proposed criminal justice center deal before the Indianapolis City-County Council will be just the first of at least two long-term, multi-million dollar contracts. A second contract to be presented to the council later is expected to increase total construction costs by $35 million to $54 million.
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Special review panel advances Indy justice center plan

April 9, 2015
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
Indianapolis City-County Council Democrats are getting nearer to their most difficult vote of the election year, as their own adviser tells them that a new criminal justice facility – however it’s built – could cost the city more money than expected down the road.
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Supporters: Justice Center needed now, will boost downtown Indianapolis

April 8, 2015
Dave Stafford
Representatives of legal, business and labor organizations said the proposed Marion County Criminal Justice Complex is a long-delayed and necessary development that would employ thousands and pump up downtown Indianapolis by vacating outdated jail and court facilities.
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Hearing to be held on proposed Indy Criminal Justice Center

April 7, 2015
IL Staff
The first of several public hearings on the proposed Indianapolis Criminal Justice Center complex will take place at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in Room 118 of the Indianapolis City-County Building.
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Indy could be short $37M on justice center financing, analysis says

April 1, 2015
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard's promise of financing a new justice center through operational savings is overblown, according to an analysis by the Indianapolis City-County Council.
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Council members: Delay justice center decision until after election

February 23, 2015
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
The odds the Indianapolis City-County Council will approve plans for a new criminal justice center this year are tanking fast.
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Marion County justice complex decision could come at last minute

February 4, 2015
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
The Indianapolis City-County Council could push the closing of a $1.6 billion deal for a new criminal justice complex to the last minute.
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2014 Year in Review

December 31, 2014
IL Staff
This year could be described as a historic one for Indiana. The state's ban on gay marriage was overturned by the courts, and, for the first time, a woman was chosen as chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court. In fact, women are leading most of the courts in Indiana. In 2014, we saw changes in the law schools, a new criminal code implemented, and attorneys in trouble with the court and the law. (Remember the attorney who doesn't like to wear socks?)
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Group challenges Marion County Criminal Justice Complex bed plan

November 5, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
A grassroots, church-based organization is trying to stir up voter interest in Marion County’s plan for a new criminal justice complex and questioning the need to expand jail capacity.
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Marion County justice center deal tests transparency laws

October 17, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
Three teams competing to partner with Indianapolis on a half-billion-dollar criminal justice complex shaped the city’s specifications in closed-door meetings.
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Indianapolis again says justice complex RFP not public

October 6, 2014
Dave Stafford
A representative of Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard told Marion County judges Monday that the request for proposals the city issued to three teams competing to design, finance and construct a criminal justice facility is not a document the public can see.
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Access counselor doubts city's need for secrecy on justice center RFP

September 26, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt told the city of Indianapolis that he wasn't swayed by its reasons for withholding its request for proposals for a new $500 million criminal justice complex.
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Marion County justice complex could add civil courts, city official says

September 8, 2014
Dave Stafford
A consolidated criminal justice complex proposed for Marion County could also eventually house civil courts, a city official told judges Monday.
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$500M Marion County Justice Center relies on novel funding

August 27, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
A mainstay of the travel industry, all-inclusive packages are gaining traction with governments that want a simpler way to deliver new public facilities. For an annual fee, a private-sector consortium will design, build, finance, maintain and operate a new road or building. Indianapolis could become one of the first U.S. cities to ink such a deal with a new jail and courthouse on the former site of the GM stamping plant.
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Indy picks former GM site for new criminal justice complex

April 28, 2014
IBJ Staff
The city of Indianapolis announced April 25 that it is asking development teams to use part of the former GM Stamping Plant property west of downtown in its proposals for a new criminal justice center.
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Former GM plant endorsed for criminal justice complex

March 26, 2014
Dave Stafford
As leaders’ support tentatively coalesced around a preferred site for a new Marion County Jail and Criminal Justice Complex just west of downtown Indianapolis, they got an earful from neighbors opposed to the plan.
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Indianapolis pitches case for jail on former GM plant site

March 19, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard’s office is pitching a proposed criminal justice complex as an economic boon to near-west-side neighborhoods.
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Mayor recommends GM stamping plant site for justice complex

March 13, 2014
IL Staff
Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard's office said early Thursday afternoon that the former General Motors stamping plant site just west of downtown will be the location named in a request for proposals to develop the criminal justice complex. The project is meant to bring together and consolidate Marion County criminal courts, jails and related offices and agencies.
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City recommends GM site for Marion County justice complex

March 13, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin, IBJ Staff
The former General Motors stamping plant west of downtown Indianapolis is Mayor Greg Ballard's preferred location for a new criminal justice complex.
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Judge: Case not made for airport justice center site

March 11, 2014
Dave Stafford
The judge who has authority over Marion County court facilities is casting doubt on the city’s preferred site for a Criminal Justice Complex at Indianapolis International Airport.
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Indianapolis announces short list for creating justice complex

March 4, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
The city of Indianapolis Tuesday morning announced three development groups that will be invited to submit proposals for a new criminal justice complex.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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