New Albany

Lawyer in gay marriage case joins Indiana congressional race

July 6, 2017
 Associated Press
An attorney who led the lawsuit that overturned Kentucky's gay marriage ban wants the Democratic nomination to challenge first-term Republican U.S. Rep. Trey Hollingsworth for his southern Indiana seat in 2018.
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Lawyer stands behind his own rollover crash tests courts ruled inadmissible

April 5, 2017
Dave Stafford
New Albany attorney Dave Scott wanted to prove a point when he strapped himself behind the wheel of a 1999 Ford Explorer that was pushed down an embankment, violently rolling over multiple times. Just to be safe, he later buckled into another Explorer that again was sent careening roof over wheels, rolling three times.
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Floyd County seeks to settle jail lawsuit for $1.23M

March 13, 2017
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana county has proposed settling a federal class action lawsuit alleging inhuman conditions at its jail for $1.23 million.
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New Albany placing moratorium on opioid treatment facilities

November 8, 2016
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana community has decided to place a six-month moratorium on methadone or suboxone clinics.
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'Small-town' Shelbyville firm expanding around the state

September 7, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
As merger fever continues to spread through the legal community, a Shelbyville-based firm is spreading out.
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District Court in New Albany closes early

January 22, 2016
IL Staff
Snow has shut down the New Albany division of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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New Albany man challenges death sentence in 2012 murder

December 10, 2015
 Associated Press
An attorney for a southern Indiana man convicted of killing three women argued Thursday that his death sentence in one of the slayings should be thrown out because the judge didn't sufficiently consider the importance of his confession.
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Southern Indiana companies sue New Albany over road changes

October 29, 2015
 Associated Press
Eight companies are suing New Albany, alleging that changes made last year to a major thoroughfare in the southern Indiana city have made the road narrow and unsafe.
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Southern District New Albany magistrate takes oath

May 15, 2015
IL Staff
New Albany attorney Van T. Willis, a senior partner with Kightlinger & Gray LLP, was sworn in Friday as a new part-time magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana by Chief Judge Richard L. Young.
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Courts closed in southern Indiana due to weather

March 5, 2015
IL Staff
Severe weather and emergency travel restrictions have closed several federal courts in southern Indiana. The Evansville and New Albany offices of the U.S. District and Bankruptcy courts for the Southern District of Indiana are closed Thursday. The Clark County Government Building, which houses the Circuit courts, is also closed.
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COA reverses in part judgment for agents on man’s insurance claim lawsuit

January 14, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
Finding the owner of a home that burned designated additional evidence which created a genuine issue of material fact, summary judgment should not have been awarded to agents on his claim, the Indiana Court of Appeals held.
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Southern District accepting applications for new part-time magistrate

October 30, 2014
IL Staff
A part-time magistrate position has become available in the New Albany location of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, thanks to authorization from the Judicial Conference of the United States.
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Opinion affirms New Albany has zoning jurisdiction over fringe area of county

January 16, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
In a dispute between the city of New Albany and Floyd County concerning which entity has zoning jurisdiction over an unincorporated area outside city limits, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment for the city.
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Historic law firm and young upstart merge in southern Indiana

July 1, 2013
IL Staff
Two law firms in New Albany are joining together to form a 14-attorney office with expanded practice areas.  
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After the storm passes, legal questions swirl

February 27, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys volunteer to provide advice and comfort to affected residents after natural disasters.
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Justices will hear arguments in Floyd County

March 28, 2012
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will visit New Albany Thursday to hear arguments in a case involving Rolls-Royce Corp.
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Judges disagree on meaning of language in city ordinance

March 22, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a trial court in a property dispute, but Judge Ezra Friedlander disagreed with the majority based on his interpretation of “conspicuous change.”
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Officer's statement not protected by First Amendment

March 16, 2012
Michael Hoskins
A divided Indiana Court of Appeals has ruled the New Albany Police Department had the right to discipline an officer whose racially charged comments made to fellow officers were leaked to the press and made public.
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Comment sought on reappointment of magistrate judge

March 10, 2011
IL Staff
Members of the bar and the public are invited to comment as to whether United States Magistrate Judge Michael G. Naville of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, New Albany Division, should be reappointed to a new four-year term.
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SCOTUS declines New Albany ordinance case

June 14, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States won’t take a case from New Albany about the city’s battle to close an adult book and movie store.
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Man accuses public defenders of malpractice

January 8, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
An accused child molester who sat in jail for 2 1/2 years until his case was dismissed is suing his former public defenders for legal malpractice.
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COA to hear arguments at 2 universities

October 12, 2009
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals hits the road Tuesday and Wednesday to hear arguments at two universities involving a negligence suit against a hospital and nurse and whether a casino can ban someone after he's been kicked out.
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Court offers free CLE on judicial restraint

October 30, 2008
IL Staff
The United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana will conduct a free CLE event next week in New Albany regarding judicial restraint.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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