New Lawyers

A growing advantage to the law school degree

November 4, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Well-documented changes in the legal profession since the economic recession are sending a small but growing number of law school graduates down a new career path toward companies that want employees with juris doctorates but do not involve the practice of law.
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Bar associations work hard to show young lawyers the benefits of membership

November 4, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Organizations are working hard to welcome, attract and retain the young professionals because this new group shows little inclination to joining. Bar associations, like associations in different industries, are seeing millennials shy away from being part of an organized group.
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Thompson: Advice to myself when I was a young lawyer

November 4, 2015
After a spirited conversation with colleagues about the opportunity to time travel, I posed the discussion topic, “If you had the opportunity to travel back in time and talk with your younger self as a new attorney, what advice would you share about life as a lawyer?”
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Jones: A millennial’s take on political involvement

November 4, 2015
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For new associates, work seems like school

September 29, 2015
 Bloomberg News
It’s like going back to school. Before they begin to work, new lawyers at many big firms complete lengthy orientation programs that provide instruction on topics like basic accounting and finance.
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New Indiana attorneys sworn in during admission ceremony

September 28, 2015
IL Staff
The state’s legal profession welcomed 312 new lawyers to its ranks Monday during an admission ceremony hosted by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Job market somewhat improved for law school grads

August 3, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The National Association for Law Placement’s new analysis of the job market heralded the first rise in the employment rate in eight years for new law school graduates. However, the uptick comes with two caveats – the method for measuring employment has been tweaked which could be contributing to the better rate and the small size of the 2014 class provides an improved jobs rate despite a lower actual number of jobs secured.
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ITLA can help young lawyers learn to practice the law

June 17, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
New ITLA Young Lawyers Section Chair Alexander Limontes says the section can provide young lawyers with both educational and networking opportunities.
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Making room for the millennials

June 3, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The new generation of lawyers embraces technology and collaboration.
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Abrams: Engage with professionals to discover opportunities

June 3, 2015
Jeffrey Abrams
I would encourage recent law school graduates to remain optimistic, work hard and network with as many attorneys as you can find since you never know when the next law firm or employer will need to hire a recent graduate.
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174 pass February Indiana Bar Exam

June 3, 2015
IL Staff
The Indiana Lawyer congratulates those who passed the February 2015 bar exam. Many of these new, aspiring lawyers participated in an admission ceremony held May 19 in Indianapolis.
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2014 law school grads see slight uptick in employment

May 1, 2015
IL Staff
National data released by the American Bar Association shows that the Class of 2014 has a slightly larger percentage of its graduates employed in long-term, full-time positions that require bar passage as compared with the Class of 2013.
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BLE announces names of 174 who passed February bar exam

April 27, 2015
IL Staff
Nearly 175 people have passed the Indiana Bar Exam. The Board of Law Examiners posted the names of the 174 successful test-takers Monday. Results are from the February 2015 exam.
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Fewer young attorneys enter graying profession, instead find alternative uses for JDs

December 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Recent Indiana law school graduates are broadening their horizons, with many taking nontraditional post-graduate paths in the business world as the legal profession is increasingly graying.
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New Indiana attorneys sworn in at admission ceremony

October 6, 2014
Kelly Lucas
The Indiana Board of Law Examiners reported that 378 of the aspiring lawyers who sat for the July bar exam were successful in that effort. On Monday, Indiana’s newest class of lawyers was sworn in at an admission ceremony hosted by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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New program gives attorneys an 'Intro to Indy'

September 10, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indianapolis Bar Association's "Intro to Indy" program will introduce attorneys to nonprofit agencies and give them leads on becoming more engaged in the community.
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Processing issue delays bar exam submissions in multiple states

July 30, 2014
 Associated Press
Florida-based testing software provider ExamSoft Worldwide Inc. said a processing issue has caused delays for bar exam takers in multiple states who were submitting their answers.
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Employability begins long before graduation day

June 18, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
To get a job as a lawyer, applicants need legal skills, such as analytical thinking, but employers today are also looking for new hires who have the so-called “soft skills.”
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Spotlight: Practical tips for new lawyers

June 18, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana Lawyer has been recognizing exemplary attorneys in our state since 2006 with the Leadership In Law awards. In recent years, we have asked the honorees – both seasoned veterans and those with only a few years of experience under their belts – to share practical advice that they received or, in retrospect, wish they had received, as young attorneys. New lawyers entering the practice in 2014 can soak up the wisdom shared and learn from these lawyers’ experiences.
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160 applicants pass the February Indiana Bar Exam

June 18, 2014
IL Staff
The Indiana Lawyer congratulates the individuals listed below on passing the February 2014 bar exam. Many of these new, aspiring lawyers participated in an admission ceremony held May 20 in Indianapolis.
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New class ceremonially admitted to Indiana bar

May 20, 2014
IL Staff
A ceremony at the Indiana Roof Ballroom in Indianapolis marked the admission of 160 new attorneys to the practice of law Tuesday.
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160 pass February bar exam

April 29, 2014
IL Staff
The Indiana Board of Law Examiners has released the names of the 160 people who passed the February 2014 bar exam.
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Legal profession lags in diversity as compared to other professions

December 11, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
Minority employment in the legal profession has grown significantly slower as compared to certain medical and business professions, according to a study released by Microsoft Corp.
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Plain English to arrive in legal briefs near you

November 20, 2013
Holly Wheeler
Ask lawyers or law professors to describe legal writing, and some of the adjectives used include: stuffy, convoluted, long-winded, confusing, expletive and pompous. Comparisons to the court case in Charles Dickens’ “Bleak House” and William Faulkner’s book “The Sound and the Fury” are also made.
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416 passed Indiana bar exam in July

November 20, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Lawyer congratulates the individuals listed below on passing the July 2013 bar exam. Many of these young and aspiring lawyers participated in the Indiana Supreme Court Admission Ceremony held Oct. 25 in Indianapolis.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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