Oral arguments

Arguments set in Lake Michigan lakeshore rights case

July 10, 2017
IL Staff
Oral arguments in a case that could establish caselaw on a dispute between public and private claims to the shore of Lake Michigan will be heard Sept. 28.
More

Justices hear arguments in case seeking bond proceeds

June 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
The justices of the Indiana Supreme Court held arguments Thursday in a case where the question is whether a man who was awarded a judgment from a defendant in a civil case will be able to collect the bond proceeds from the defendant’s unrelated criminal case.
More

Madison park focus of man's drug conviction appeal before Supreme Court

June 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
A man’s felony drug conviction level depends on whether the Indiana Supreme Court believes he sold drugs near a public park where children were “reasonably expected” to be.
More

Arguments Thursday in drug case near park with no equipment

June 16, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on whether children were reasonably expected to be playing at a park with no playground equipment or trees, the central question that must be answered to determine if a man should be convicted of cooking meth within 500 feet of the park.
More

Justices question teen's LWOP sentence at oral arguments

June 15, 2017
Olivia Covington
In Indiana, only five juveniles have been sentenced to life without parole. Now, the fate of the fifth juvenile rests with the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court, who must decide whether the teen’s act of shooting and killing another 17-year-old rises to a level of offense that warrants spending the rest of his life behind bars.
More

Justices to decide if man should face charge for sending teen explicit photo

June 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
There are two, possibly conflicting, statutes at play in a case now under consideration by the Indiana Supreme Court in a case involving an explicit photo sent to a teen – one that sets the age of consent for sexual activity at 16 years old, and one that prohibits the dissemination of matter “harmful to minors” to any minor under the age of 18.
More

Justices to decide whether adults can send sexually explicit images to certain teens

June 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
After oral arguments before the Indiana Supreme Court next week, the justices will decide if adults can send sexually explicit photos to 16- and 17-year-olds without breaking state law.
More

Justices weigh restitution order linked to car theft

June 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court will decide if the state properly assessed restitution against a woman convicted of auto theft after hearing oral arguments Thursday morning that suggested there was no evidence directly linking her to some of the damage to the vehicle.
More

Legal malpractice arguments focus on whether crime victim lost settlement chance

May 31, 2017
Dave Stafford
Can agency immunity cover a lawyer's failure to file a tort claim notice and lawsuit?
More

Justices to hear arguments in caseload case against DCS this week

May 30, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments this week to determine whether an employee of the Indiana Department of Child Services can bring a class-action complaint against her employer for an alleged violation of statutory caseload limits under the public standing doctrine.
More

Justices consider ‘reasonable’ standard in flash bang search case

May 26, 2017
Olivia Covington
As criticism across the country continues to grow against the use of flash bang devices, a highly controversial police diversionary tool, the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court must decide whether the use of such a tool in Evansville constituted an unreasonable assault on the home.
More

Justices to hear arguments in Evansville 'military-style assault' case

May 24, 2017
IL Staff
Indiana’s Supreme Court is set to hear cases Thursday involving the withdrawal of guilty pleas, the use of search warrants and the revocation of good-time credit.
More

Justices weigh whether negligent hiring claim allowed against Pizza Hut

May 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
In its first oral arguments as a temporarily four-person bench, the Indiana Supreme Court considered Thursday whether the plaintiff in a wrongful death case can bring employment-based claims against an employer if the employer has admitted the employee involved in the death was acting in the scope of their employment.
More

IDEM whistleblower makes argument to Indiana Supreme Court

May 18, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A former employee of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management appeared in the Indiana Supreme Court courtroom Thursday arguing her right to bring a complaint against the state under the whistleblower provision of the Indiana False Claims Act.
More

Richard rule’ questioned during oral arguments in 4th Amendment case

May 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court is being asked to determine whether a ruling by the Indiana Court of Appeals that allows police to search a passenger in a car after a police dog alerts to drugs being in the vehicle goes too far.
More

COA to hear legal malpractice appeal

May 12, 2017
IL Staff
A woman who lost her legal malpractice case against a law firm she said failed to timely bring negligence and wrongful death claims against the St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s office will have her day before the Indiana Court of Appeals next week.
More

Supreme Court to hear whistleblower case against IDEM

May 12, 2017
IL Staff
A former state employee who claims she was fired for blowing the whistle on questionable payment practices in the Indiana Department of Environment Management will bring her case before the Indiana Supreme Court next week, when she will urge the justices to allow her complaint against the state agency to continue.
More

Supreme Court hears INDOT case during Rucker’s final oral arguments

May 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
In his last oral arguments on the bench of the Indiana Supreme Court, Justice Robert Rucker and three other justices considered the public standing doctrine and the concept of parens patriae as they weighed granting transfer to a case involving a dispute between a state agency and a local municipality.
More

Justices consider use of ‘dark box’ properties in assessments

April 27, 2017
Olivia Covington
Discerning the true meaning of the term “market value-in-use” is the central task now before the Indiana Supreme Court as it considers whether to accept review of a tax case that attorneys say will have a far-reaching effect on Indiana’s assessment system.
More

Justices seem to favor limits on revoking US citizenship

April 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States seemed ready Wednesday to impose limits on when the government can strip an immigrant of U.S. citizenship for lying during the naturalization process.
More

Justices consider case involving rejected doctrine of res gestae

April 27, 2017
Olivia Covington
In a case that defense counsel warns could allow the concept of res gestae to be reintroduced into the Indiana judiciary, the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court considered whether a gun that was not brandished during a northern Indiana altercation was relevant evidence that led to the appellants’ convictions.
More

COA hears malpractice case involving former Conour associate

April 21, 2017
Olivia Covington
Roughly five years after former Indianapolis personal injury attorney William Conour was charged in a federal wire fraud case, the Indiana Court of Appeals heard a legal malpractice action involving one of his ex-colleagues for alleged malpractice. One of Conour's victims claims the attorney's actions kept her in the dark about theft of her settlement money.
More

Playground case touches on separation of church and state

April 19, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States signaled Wednesday that it will decide an important case on the separation of church and state in favor of a Missouri church that wants state money to put a soft surface on its preschool playground.
More

SCOTUS to hear church-state case

April 17, 2017
 Associated Press
Justice Neil Gorsuch's first week on the U.S. Supreme Court bench features an important case about the separation of church and state that has its roots on a Midwestern church playground. The outcome could make it easier to use state money to pay for private, religious schooling in many states.
More

Arguments set for birth certificate appeal

April 14, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has scheduled oral arguments in Indiana’s birth certificate dispute for next month.
More
Page  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  2. MELISA EVA VALUE INVESTMENT Greetings to you from Melisa Eva Value Investment. We offer Business and Personal loans, it is quick and easy and hence can be availed without any hassle. We do not ask for any collateral or guarantors while approving these loans and hence these loans require minimum documentation. We offer great and competitive interest rates of 2% which do not weigh you down too much. These loans have a comfortable pay-back period. Apply today by contacting us on E-mail: melisaeva9@gmail.com WE DO NOT ASK FOR AN UPFRONT FEE. BEWARE OF SCAMMERS AND ONLINE FRAUD.

  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

ADVERTISEMENT