Oral arguments

Justices hear constitutional challenge to right-to-work law

September 4, 2014
Dave Stafford
Indiana’s right-to-work statute is clearly anti-union, one state Supreme Court justice said Thursday, but all five justices seemed dubious of arguments that it violated the state constitution.
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Judges blast Indiana, Wisconsin gay marriage bans

August 26, 2014
 Associated Press
Federal appeals judges bristled Tuesday at arguments defending gay marriage bans in Indiana and Wisconsin, with one Republican appointee comparing them to now-defunct laws that once outlawed weddings between blacks and whites.
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2 attorneys to argue for same-sex marriage before 7th Circuit

August 22, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
In a rare move, two attorneys will share the podium and argue before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals that Indiana’s law defining marriage as only between one man and one woman is unconstitutional.
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7th Circuit denies en banc motion in same-sex marriage challenge

July 25, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals denied the state’s motion and will seat the standard three-judge panel when it hears oral arguments next month on Indiana’s same-sex marriage lawsuits.
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Attempted child seduction case exposes gap in law

May 21, 2014
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court is considering whether a teacher took a substantial step toward the crime of attempted child seduction when he sent explicit Facebook messages to a 16-year-old student and proposed arranging to meet for sex.
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Indiana justices consider whether ‘cause of death’ is public information

May 8, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The Evansville newspaper and local county health department appeared before the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday, reviving a dispute they had decades ago over whether death certificates are public record.
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Badger: Supreme Court will hear death records dispute

May 7, 2014
Steven Badger
The Indiana Supreme Court will hear oral argument May 8 in a dispute over public access to county death records. The case, Evansville Courier & Press v. Vanderburgh County Health Department, raises the issue of whether a county health department’s death certificates, including the cause of death, are public records under the Indiana Access to Public Records Act.
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Former IURC chair’s appeal raises questions on official misconduct law

April 9, 2014
Dave Stafford
Did a former state utility regulator’s behavior that got him fired rise to official misconduct if he committed no crime? An Indiana Court of Appeals panel grappled with that question, as well as which version of the law applies, during oral arguments March 31.
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Disability, religious-freedom claims clash at Indiana Supreme Court

February 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
An argument over dinner has taken on First Amendment religious-freedom and disability-protection dimensions before the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Timing of wrongful death claim disputed

December 18, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
In a wrongful-death claim filed nearly five years after a nursing home death, the Indiana Supreme Court is considering whether in instances of fraudulent concealment the two-year limitation clock starts over or if giving plaintiffs “reasonable time” to file is an acceptable standard.
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State, IBM contest $62 million award for canceled welfare contract

December 4, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana Court of Appeals judges spent the better part of a 90-minute oral argument Nov. 25 focused on whether a trial judge’s order applied the proper legal standards in awarding $62 million to IBM after the state canceled its $1.3 billion contract to overhaul Indiana’s welfare administration.
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IBM seeks greater judgment; state claims $62 million award erroneous

November 25, 2013
Dave Stafford
A $62 million judgment against the state for canceling a contract with IBM to overhaul Indiana’s social services administration is clearly erroneous, an attorney for the state argued Monday, while an IBM lawyer argued the company was entitled to even greater damages.
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Program provides lawyers trial run at oral argument

November 6, 2013
Dave Stafford
A novel program offered by the Indianapolis Bar Association and the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis, the Indiana Appellate Institute gives lawyers a trial run in which they can practice their arguments before a panel of volunteer lawyers and sometimes former judges and justices.
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South Bend nudity case goes from Supreme Court to the stage

October 23, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Following the completion of arguments before the Supreme Court of the United States, Indiana attorney Wayne Uhl found himself in a gaggle of reporters on the outside plaza. The 1991 case with its questions about nude dancing, pasties, G-strings and First Amendment rights had, not surprisingly, attracted national media interest.
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Justices weigh $2.7 billion Rockport deal

September 11, 2013
Dave Stafford
A controversial, politically charged power plant proposal voided by an appellate court and later waylaid by the General Assembly and Gov. Mike Pence landed before the Indiana Supreme Court Sept. 5. Attorneys for and against the proposed plant pleaded that terms of the contract were on their side.
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‘Appeals on Wheels’ takes teacher license suspension case to Franklin

September 6, 2013
IL Staff
Franklin College will host a traveling Court of Appeals oral argument Sept. 17 in which a teacher appeals the suspension of her license by a Department of Education administrative law judge.
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Justices weigh contract dispute in $2.7 billion Rockport coal-to-gas plan

September 5, 2013
Dave Stafford
A controversial, politically charged power plant proposal voided by an appellate court and later waylaid by the General Assembly and Gov. Mike Pence landed before the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday.
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Holiday World family takes dispute to Court of Appeals

August 6, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
An agreement meant to keep a popular amusement park in the family has sparked a bitter dispute that has reached the Indiana Court of Appeals.
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Justices schedule high-profile arguments

June 14, 2013
Dave Stafford
Justices will waste little time getting to high-profile cases when they hear a new slate of oral arguments after Labor Day. The Indiana Supreme Court has scheduled 20 arguments beginning Sept. 5 and continuing for the next few months.
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Justices look to set arguments in Rockport, blogger’s intimidation cases

June 10, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court may hold arguments in September on the case involving the controversial Rockport coal gasification plant as well as on the case of a Dearborn County man who was convicted of intimidation of a judge based on online rants.
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Complex wrongful-death legal fee appeal puzzles judges

May 28, 2013
Dave Stafford
Judges on a panel of the Indiana Court of Appeals were stumped at times Friday in a case regarding legal fees due from the Indiana Patient’s Compensation Fund to the estate of a woman who won a wrongful death judgment after she died from burns at a care facility.
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On the road, jurists give public access to appellate cases

May 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
It’s no accident that on a college campus in Richmond recently, the Indiana Supreme Court heard a case that involves allegations of hazing and potential liability for an incident at a Wabash College fraternity.
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Justices will visit Lake County for arguments in drug case

May 3, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court travels to Merrillville High School May 9 for oral arguments dealing with the admittance of drug evidence after a vehicle search.
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Justices focus on hazing, duty in Wabash fraternity case

April 24, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana Supreme Court justices on Tuesday quizzed attorneys about what constitutes hazing and whether Wabash College and a fraternity chapter owed a duty to protect a pledge injured when fraternity brothers placed him in a chokehold then dropped him.
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Indiana justices hit the road to hear hazing arguments

April 17, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will travel to Indiana University East in Richmond next week to hear arguments in a hazing lawsuit involving Wabash College.
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  1. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

  2. Seventh Circuit Court Judge Diane Wood has stated in “The Rule of Law in Times of Stress” (2003), “that neither laws nor the procedures used to create or implement them should be secret; and . . . the laws must not be arbitrary.” According to the American Bar Association, Wood’s quote drives home this point: The rule of law also requires that people can expect predictable results from the legal system; this is what Judge Wood implies when she says that “the laws must not be arbitrary.” Predictable results mean that people who act in the same way can expect the law to treat them in the same way. If similar actions do not produce similar legal outcomes, people cannot use the law to guide their actions, and a “rule of law” does not exist.

  3. Linda, I sure hope you are not seeking a law license, for such eighteenth century sentiments could result in your denial in some jurisdictions minting attorneys for our tolerant and inclusive profession.

  4. Mazel Tov to the newlyweds. And to those bakers, photographers, printers, clerks, judges and others who will lose careers and social standing for not saluting the New World (Dis)Order, we can all direct our Two Minutes of Hate as Big Brother asks of us. Progress! Onward!

  5. My daughter was taken from my home at the end of June/2014. I said I would sign the safety plan but my husband would not. My husband said he would leave the house so my daughter could stay with me but the case worker said no her mind is made up she is taking my daughter. My daughter went to a friends and then the friend filed a restraining order which she was told by dcs if she did not then they would take my daughter away from her. The restraining order was not in effect until we were to go to court. Eventually it was dropped but for 2 months DCS refused to allow me to have any contact and was using the restraining order as the reason but it was not in effect. This was Dcs violating my rights. Please help me I don't have the money for an attorney. Can anyone take this case Pro Bono?

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