Oral arguments

COA to hold oral arguments at Valparaiso

April 3, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals “Appeals on Wheels” program will take the state’s second-highest court to Valparaiso this week.
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Notre Dame law students slated to argue before military appellate court

March 30, 2017
IL Staff
Two Notre Dame Law School students will get the opportunity to argue before an international appellate court when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces hosts oral arguments at the school next week.
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Sales of Polar Pure brings forfeiture dispute to US Supreme Court

March 28, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The Supreme Court of the United States will enter the debate over civil forfeiture Wednesday when the eight justices consider whether the government can seize property from a convicted co-conspirator who did not receive any of the profits from the criminal transactions.
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High court struggles over hospital pension dispute

March 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States is struggling over whether some of the nation's largest hospitals should be allowed to sidestep federal laws protecting pension benefits for workers.
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4th Amendment seizure case goes to Supreme Court

March 24, 2017
Olivia Covington
It was a high-crime area, he was wearing the color associated with a local gang, and police believed he was a juvenile who was truant from school. Given those circumstances, state officials argued before the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday that officers were justified in stopping 18-year-old Jordan Jacobs and arresting him after discovering an handgun in his pocket.
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Parties urge justices to take med-mal case to provide clarity

March 24, 2017
Olivia Covington
A medical malpractice case on petition to transfer before the Indiana Supreme Court had both the appellants and appellees urging the justices Thursday to take their case.
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Justices consider ‘grossly disproportionate’ standard in civil forfeitures

March 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
The U.S. Supreme Court established a standard nearly 20 years ago for determining when the punitive nature of a civil forfeiture has surpassed a reasonable limit: if the forfeiture is “grossly disproportionate” to the criminal conduct in question.
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Fitness to parent raised in man’s fatal neglect appeal

March 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
A man whose 4-month-old son died of malnutrition asked an appeals court to consider whether he was mentally capable of caring for the child while also invoking the jury’s right to question witnesses in contesting his conviction and 37-year sentence.
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Northwest Indiana lawyers ready to welcome Supreme Court

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
When the Indiana Supreme Court arrives in Gary for oral arguments Thursday, the legal community in Northwest Indiana will be offering a special welcome for the justices and in particular, its favorite son, Justice Robert Rucker.
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Tax Court returns to IU Maurer for hearing in new CVS case

March 6, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Tax Court will return to Bloomington this week to hear another case involving the Monroe County Assessor and the CVS Corporation.
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Justices consider whether arrest after filing can halt expungement

March 2, 2017
Dave Stafford
Indiana Supreme Court justices focused on the phrase “upon receipt” in analyzing whether an expungement must be granted to a qualified petitioner. But they also puzzled over whether the Legislature would have intended the second-chance statute to extend to people who have subsequent run-ins with the law.
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Supreme Court sets argument at Rucker’s high school

March 1, 2017
IL Staff
One of Justice Robert Rucker’s final arguments as member of the Indiana Supreme Court will be a Lake County case heard at his high school alma mater in Gary.
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COA to hear right-to-work case at IU Maurer

March 1, 2017
IL Staff
A panel of the Indiana Court of Appeals will hold oral arguments in a case involving Indiana’s controversial right-to-work law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law this week.
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Justices question meaning of EBITDA in HHGregg manager bonus case

February 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
After a key member of HHGregg’s leadership team died in 2012, his $40 million life insurance policy was paid out to the company and brought that year’s total earnings to $143.5 million. Now, senior managers on the HHGregg team say they should receive bonuses based on the total 2012 earnings, claiming that the life insurance policy propelled the company to an earnings level that warranted extra compensation for their work.
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Supreme Court hears Spirited Sales liquor wholesaling case

February 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
The fate of Spirited Sales LLC’s liquor wholesaling license is in the hands of the Indiana Supreme Court as the justices consider whether allowing the company to keep its permit would enable its parent company, Monarch Beverage Co., to gain an unlawful monopoly in the alcohol wholesaling business.
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Supreme Court to hear HHGregg, managers’ incentive fight

February 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court will hear a case Feb. 23 in which a trial court and the Indiana Court of Appeals reached opposite conclusions about whether key HHGregg managers were entitled to incentive bonuses triggered by the company’s receipt of $40 million from an executive’s life insurance proceeds.
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Justices consider life without parole sentence in Richmond Hill appeal

February 16, 2017
Olivia Covington
As the Indiana judicial system enters its fifth year of prosecuting individuals involved in the deadly 2012 Richmond Hill home explosion in Indianapolis that killed two and damaged dozens of homes, one of the leading culprits is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to reconsider his sentence for his role in the deaths.
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Tax Court to hear arguments at IU Maurer

February 8, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana Tax Court is taking its oral arguments on the road and heading to Bloomington this week.
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COA considers new allegations in medical malpractice cases

February 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
Can parties present evidence or theories at trial that were not presented to the medical review panel?
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Justices seek to define ‘indisputably’ in K-9 case

January 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
After leading South Bend police officers on a five-minute vehicular chase through city streets, Royce Love eventually stopped his van and was ordered to exit it. Love’s account of what happened next varies significantly from the officers’ account, and that disparity was the main issue the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court sought to resolve when they heard arguments in the case Thursday.
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US Supreme Court hears case over deportations

January 17, 2017
 Associated Press
The Obama administration tried to persuade the Supreme Court of the United States Tuesday to retain a federal law that makes it easier to deport immigrants who have been convicted of crimes.
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Justices consider ‘reasonable suspicion’ standard in gun tip case

December 15, 2016
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday as to whether officers acting on a tip had reasonable suspicion to question and arrest a man in a movie theater lobby for having a gun without a license.
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Justices consider cellphone data in 4th Amendment case

December 14, 2016
Olivia Covington
Is the act of turning on a cellphone a voluntary agreement to share that data, or do consumers have a right to privacy of the location information collected from their personal devices? The justices of the Indiana Supreme Court heard legal arguments on both sides of that issue during oral arguments in a case on Dec. 8.
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Justices weigh cellphone data privacy rights in 4th Amendment case

December 8, 2016
Olivia Covington
When people turn on their cellphones, they have a general understanding that some data regarding their whereabouts will be collected. But if a person does not know the extent to which that data is collected, then can the court say that such data was voluntarily released by the person, or is there an expected right to privacy?
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Justices consider conversion of felony to misdemeanor after plea agreement

December 1, 2016
Olivia Covington
The effect of legislative changes to state sentencing laws was at center in oral arguments before the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday.
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  1. One can only wonder whether Mr. Kimmel was paid for his work by Mr. Burgh ... or whether that bill fell to the citizens of Indiana, many of whom cannot afford attorneys for important matters. It really doesn't take a judge(s) to know that "pavement" can be considered a deadly weapon. It only takes a brain and some education or thought. I'm glad to see the conviction was upheld although sorry to see that the asphalt could even be considered "an issue".

  2. In response to bryanjbrown: thank you for your comment. I am familiar with Paul Ogden (and applaud his assistance to Shirley Justice) and have read of Gary Welsh's (strange) death (and have visited his blog on many occasions). I am not familiar with you (yet). I lived in Kosciusko county, where the sheriff was just removed after pleading in what seems a very "sweetheart" deal. Unfortunately, something NEEDS to change since the attorneys won't (en masse) stand up for ethics (rather making a show to please the "rules" and apparently the judges). I read that many attorneys are underemployed. Seems wisdom would be to cull the herd and get rid of the rotting apples in practice and on the bench, for everyone's sake as well as justice. I'd like to file an attorney complaint, but I have little faith in anything (other than the most flagrant and obvious) resulting in action. My own belief is that if this was medicine, there'd be maimed and injured all over and the carnage caused by "the profession" would be difficult to hide. One can dream ... meanwhile, back to figuring out to file a pro se "motion to dismiss" as well as another court required paper that Indiana is so fond of providing NO resources for (unlike many other states, who don't automatically assume that citizens involved in the court process are scumbags) so that maybe I can get the family law attorney - whose work left me with no settlement, no possessions and resulted in the death of two pets (etc ad nauseum) - to stop abusing the proceedings supplemental and small claims rules and using it as a vehicle for harassment and apparently, amusement.

  3. Been on social security sense sept 2011 2massive strokes open heart surgery and serious ovarian cancer and a blood clot in my lung all in 14 months. Got a letter in may saying that i didn't qualify and it was in form like i just applied ,called social security she said it don't make sense and you are still geting a check in june and i did ,now i get a check from my part D asking for payment for july because there will be no money for my membership, call my prescription coverage part D and confirmed no check will be there.went to social security they didn't want to answer whats going on just said i should of never been on it .no one knows where this letter came from was California im in virginia and been here sense my strokes and vcu filed for my disability i was in the hospital when they did it .It's like it was a error . My ,mothers social security was being handled in that office in California my sister was dealing with it and it had my social security number because she died last year and this letter came out of the same office and it came at the same time i got the letter for my mother benefits for death and they had the same date of being typed just one was on the mail Saturday and one on Monday. . I think it's a mistake and it should been fixed instead there just getting rid of me .i never got a formal letter saying when i was being tsken off.

  4. Employers should not have racially discriminating mind set. It has huge impact on the society what the big players do or don't do in the industry. Background check is conducted just to verify whether information provided by the prospective employee is correct or not. It doesn't have any direct combination with the rejection of the employees. If there is rejection, there should be something effective and full-proof things on the table that may keep the company or the people associated with it in jeopardy.

  5. Unlike the federal judge who refused to protect me, the Virginia State Bar gave me a hearing. After the hearing, the Virginia State Bar refused to discipline me. VSB said that attacking me with the court ADA coordinator had, " all the grace and charm of a drive-by shooting." One does wonder why the VSB was able to have a hearing and come to that conclusion, but the federal judge in Indiana slammed the door of the courthouse in my face.

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