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Federal Bar Update: Northern, Southern District courts cleaning up local rules

November 7, 2012
John Maley
Local Rule amendments are in the works in the Northern District and Southern District of Indiana, with amendments to take effect Jan. 1.
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Gingerich trial stirs juvenile advocates

October 24, 2012
Dave Stafford
Sentenced at 12 for conspiracy to commit murder, Paul Henry Gingerich's appeal claims due process violations.
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SCOTUS decision on seed use may affect farming practices

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The doctrine of patent exhaustion is at the center of a Knox County dispute involving Monsanto Technology over the use of seeds.
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Lawyers capture beauty of courthouses in their art

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana attorneys use photographs, paint to preserve art and history of courthouses.
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Vinovich takes the helm of Indiana State Bar Association

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The incoming president will launch 3-year initiative to focus on member benefits, diversity and governance.
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Lawyers say Conour skipped workers' comp lien payments

October 24, 2012
Dave Stafford
As damages claimed against the former attorney rise, William Conour is still without counsel as his federal trial is delayed.
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ISBA-led art project to honor former chief justice

October 24, 2012
IL Staff
The Indiana State Bar Association Leadership Development Academy is calling upon artisans to design a work of public art that will both honor a leader in the Indiana judiciary and invite children to play.
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Lucas: More information is needed when judging the judges

October 24, 2012
Kelly Lucas
Up the street and around the corner from my Broad Ripple house, a yard sign caught my eye that didn’t involve the usual Democrat versus Republican political rhetoric. This simple, hand-painted sign called for the ouster of Supreme Court Justice Steven David.
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Start Page: why the fax won't die

October 24, 2012
Kim Brand
The modern fax machine was introduced in 1964 by Xerox. Fast forward to today. Unless you use a typewriter, there are no other machines in your office that have remained essentially unchanged in form and function for almost 50 years. Fax is ubiquitous, reliable, simple and cheap. Why would you want to mess that up?
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Small law firm sees faith in class-action suit pay off

October 24, 2012
Greg Andrews
A federal judge appears likely to approve the largest class-action settlement ever to come out of a local court, and DeLaney & DeLaney, a small Indianapolis law firm that helped press the case, is poised to profit handsomely.
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Lady Justice gets 'green' makeover

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The greening – literally – of the rooftop of the Indianapolis federal courthouse is part of a $66.8 million upgrade of the building with funds coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Work on the roof along with additional upgrades to increase the energy efficiency of the facility as well as to improve the public safety system began in December 2009 and was substantially complete on Aug. 27, 2012, according to the U.S. General Services Administration.
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Too little diversity among attorneys

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
St. Joseph County Bar Association Diversity Committee recently organized a Diversity and Inclusion Summit to shed light on the low number of minorities in the law and bounce around ideas about attracting more minorities, women, and gays and lesbians to the practice of law.
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Indiana Department of Child Services urged to set course for new direction

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
With a new governor taking over Indiana’s executive branch in January, what changes, if any, will come to the Department of Child Services are unknown. However, some contend that should not stop the agency from addressing criticism and implementing new policies or programs now.
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After 5 years, state court data system Odyssey isn't halfway home

October 10, 2012
Dave Stafford
In the Greek epic “The Odyssey,” Homer’s hero Odysseus takes 10 years to return home after the Trojan War. Indiana’s Odyssey might take longer to reach its goal. Odyssey, the state-backed court case management system that aims to connect and modernize more than 400 trial courts, is continuing its laborious progress, locality by locality.
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Death penalty foe Foster pumps up federal defenders

October 10, 2012
Dave Stafford
Taking charge at Indiana Federal Community Defenders Inc. in the Southern District, Monica Foster's seeking, and getting, bigger caseloads.
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From iPhones to networks, law firm spending on systems ticks up

October 10, 2012
Dave Stafford
If your firm hasn’t bought you a new smartphone, provided better remote access options, or replaced an aging monitor lately, you might nudge the purchasing department.
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Attorneys discover predictive coding

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
In the world of searching for relevant documents in the recesses of email inboxes and hard drives, a new high-tech tool has appeared that, despite causing trepidation among some attorneys, will likely become commonly used during the discovery process to tame the growing volumes of data.
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Nordstrom: Book offers little insight for experienced trial attorneys

October 10, 2012
Rodney Nordstrom
Rodney Nordstrom reviews "Winning the Jury's Attention: Presenting Evidence from Voir Dire to Closing."
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Dean's Desk: Pro bono projects broaden opportunities, instill values

October 10, 2012
Hannah Buxbaum
Preparing students for the rigors and complexity of today’s legal profession requires schools to focus not only on doctrinal analysis, but also on the complete set of professional competencies that successful lawyers require. Toward that end, the faculty at the I.U. Maurer School of Law has adopted a series of initiatives aimed at expanding the range of experiential learning opportunities available to our students.
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Lucas: Nominations for 2013 Leadership in Law awards being accepted

October 10, 2012
Kelly Lucas
I encourage you to nominate an up-and-coming lawyer or distinguished barrister who you admire. Time is limited, and I realize that when it comes to discretionary projects like completing a nomination form, while our intentions are good, our follow-through can fall short. But there is something about the feeling derived from taking the time – or making the time – to do something like this that is so satisfying.
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Technology Untangled: Send and receive large files with ease

October 10, 2012
Stephen Bour
Using attachments in email is a common and simple method for sending files. There is, however, a problem when those attachments get too large. That is because there are file size limits on most email services for both sending and receiving attachments.
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Loretta Rush is Indiana's next justice

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
Colleagues say the Supreme Court appointee brings life balance, temperament and skill to the job.
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Zoeller, senators at odds over immigration law

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
Indiana lawmakers seek to intervene with aid of Kansas official Kris Kobach.
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ILS Medical Legal Partnership gives Midtown clients access to legal services

September 26, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Legal Services' clinic helps clients at Midtown Community Mental Health Center navigate through legal entanglements that can ensnare them.
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Victim funds create legal, public policy issues

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
Kenneth Feinberg, an authority on victim compensation funds, says circumstances warranting these types of programs are "rare."
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  1. Have been seeing this wonderful physician for a few years and was one of his patients who told him about what we were being told at CVS. Multiple ones. This was a witch hunt and they shold be ashamed of how patients were treated. Most of all, CVS should be ashamed for what they put this physician through. So thankful he fought back. His office is no "pill mill'. He does drug testing multiple times a year and sees patients a minimum of four times a year.

  2. Brian W, I fear I have not been sufficiently entertaining to bring you back. Here is a real laugh track that just might do it. When one is grabbed by the scruff of his worldview and made to choose between his Confession and his profession ... it is a not a hard choice, given the Confession affects eternity. But then comes the hardship in this world. Imagine how often I hear taunts like yours ... "what, you could not even pass character and fitness after they let you sit and pass their bar exam ... dude, there must really be something wrong with you!" Even one of the Bishop's foremost courtiers said that, when explaining why the RCC refused to stand with me. You want entertaining? How about watching your personal economy crash while you have a wife and five kids to clothe and feed. And you can't because you cannot work, because those demanding you cast off your Confession to be allowed into "their" profession have all the control. And you know that they are wrong, dead wrong, and that even the professional code itself allows your Faithful stand, to wit: "A lawyer may refuse to comply with an obligation imposed by law upon a good faith belief that no valid obligation exists. The provisions of Rule 1.2(d) concerning a good faith challenge to the validity, scope, meaning or application of the law apply to challenges of legal regulation of the practice of law." YET YOU ARE A NONPERSON before the BLE, and will not be heard on your rights or their duties to the law -- you are under tyranny, not law. And so they win in this world, you lose, and you lose even your belief in the rule of law, and demoralization joins poverty, and very troubling thoughts impeaching self worth rush in to fill the void where your career once lived. Thoughts you did not think possible. You find yourself a failure ... in your profession, in your support of your family, in the mirror. And there is little to keep hope alive, because tyranny rules so firmly and none, not the church, not the NGO's, none truly give a damn. Not even a new court, who pay such lip service to justice and ancient role models. You want entertainment? Well if you are on the side of the courtiers running the system that has crushed me, as I suspect you are, then Orwell must be a real riot: "There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always — do not forget this, Winston — always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever." I never thought they would win, I always thought that at the end of the day the rule of law would prevail. Yes, the rule of man's law. Instead power prevailed, so many rules broken by the system to break me. It took years, but, finally, the end that Dr Bowman predicted is upon me, the end that she advised the BLE to take to break me. Ironically, that is the one thing in her far left of center report that the BLE (after stamping, in red ink, on Jan 22) is uninterested in, as that the BLE and ADA office that used the federal statute as a sword now refuses to even dialogue on her dire prediction as to my fate. "C'est la vie" Entertaining enough for you, status quo defender?

  3. Low energy. Next!

  4. Had William Pryor made such provocative statements as a candidate for the Indiana bar he could have been blackballed as I have documented elsewhere on this ezine. That would have solved this huuuge problem for the Left and abortion industry the good old boy (and even girl) Indiana way. Note that Diane Sykes could have made a huuge difference, but she chose to look away like most all jurists who should certainly recognize a blatantly unconstitutional system when filed on their docket. See footnotes 1 & 2 here: http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-7th-circuit/1592921.html Sykes and Kanne could have applied a well established exception to Rooker Feldman, but instead seemingly decided that was not available to conservative whistleblowers, it would seem. Just a loss and two nice footnotes to numb the pain. A few short years later Sykes ruled the very opposite on the RF question, just as she had ruled the very opposite on RF a few short years before. Indy and the abortion industry wanted me on the ground ... they got it. Thank God Alabama is not so corrupted! MAGA!!!

  5. OK, take notice. Those wondering just how corrupt the Indiana system is can see the picture in this post. Attorney Donald James did not criticize any judges, he merely, it would seem, caused some clients to file against him and then ignored his own defense. James thus disrespected the system via ignoring all and was also ordered to reimburse the commission $525.88 for the costs of prosecuting the first case against him. Yes, nearly $526 for all the costs, the state having proved it all. Ouch, right? Now consider whistleblower and constitutionalist and citizen journalist Paul Ogden who criticized a judge, defended himself in such a professional fashion as to have half the case against him thrown out by the ISC and was then handed a career ending $10,000 bill as "half the costs" of the state crucifying him. http://www.theindianalawyer.com/ogden-quitting-law-citing-high-disciplinary-fine/PARAMS/article/35323 THE TAKEAWAY MESSAGE for any who have ears to hear ... resist Star Chamber and pay with your career ... welcome to the Indiana system of (cough) justice.

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