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Lawyer-pilot named Aviator of the Year

June 20, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Rod Taylor's charitable efforts have raised millions for one Indiana hospital.
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Indiana's new laws starting July 1, 2012

June 20, 2012
IL Staff
Many of the laws enacted during the 2012 legislative session take effect July 1. This list includes enrolled acts, along with newly assigned public law numbers, that have full or partial July 1 effective dates.
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Filial statutes create questions about duty to support

June 20, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
A recent Pennsylvania court decision has spurred discussion among elder law attorneys about when an adult child may be found financially responsible for a parent’s long-term medical care.
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Termination of father's parental rights upheld on appeal

June 6, 2012
Dave Stafford
A father with a history of incarceration and substance abuse properly had his parental rights to his four minor children terminated, an Indiana Court of Appeals panel ruled Wednesday.
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Zero tolerance in schools could lead to problems for students in future

June 6, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Indiana's effort to study juvenile justice issues has stalled as the group waits for the governor to appoint a chair.
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Technology Untangled: Samsung 7-inch tablet fills a portable niche

June 6, 2012
Stephen Bour
Today we will review the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0. The first two things that caught my attention were the low $250 price and the small 7-inch size.
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Hogsett lifts US attorney's public profile

June 6, 2012
Dave Stafford
One expert says federal prosecutors have become more visible across the country.
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Big-firm attorneys find comfort zone in practice outside the office

June 6, 2012
Dave Stafford
Technology gives attorneys the ability to work almost anywhere, but working from home carries tradeoffs for the attorney and the firm.
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The men behind the law school names

June 6, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Mickey Maurer and Bob McKinney have provided financial support and guidance to the Indiana University law schools with the hope their alma maters continue to achieve new milestones.
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Proposals would add visas for STEM workers

June 6, 2012
Dave Stafford
Highly skilled immigrants are the focus of 2 bills introduced in Congress.
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Shootings put safety on lawyers' radar

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Two separate shootings involving Fort Wayne attorneys highlight the need for lawyers to use common sense when it comes to protecting themselves.
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Dickson values continuity for court

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
Indiana’s new chief justice will preside as the Supreme Court faces a 'precarious' future.
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Pro Bono Commission chair sees dramatic drop in funding during term

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
Colleagues say Indiana Court of Appeals Judge Melissa May's selflessness and volunteer spirit made her ideally suited for the position.
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Fund will build on Shepard's legacy of promoting diversity

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
Former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard’s commitment to diversity will continue thanks to a permanent fund that aims to expand on his pioneering efforts to make the legal profession more reflective of society at large.
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5 make first cut for Court of Appeals vacancy

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
A consumer protection official, a public defender, two judges and a law professor are semifinalists for a position on the Indiana Court of Appeals.
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Finney: Give power to your point at trial

May 23, 2012
Deanna Finney writes about using PowerPoint as a trial presentation tool.
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Indiana Tech breaks ground on law school

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
The school's dean says its different educational model will attract students.
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Child Advocates has been the voice of children for 30 years

May 9, 2012
Holly Wheeler
As Court Appointed Special Advocate for Marion County, Child Advocates is celebrating its 30th anniversary, having assisted more than 75,000 children since its inception. Today, the organization advocates for every child involved in a Marion County abuse or neglect case – more than 5,000 annually – with the help of more than 400 volunteers.
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New bar group advocates for military spouse JDs

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Relaxed admission requirements by states could remove barriers to employment for lawyers who must move when spouse relocates.
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'Hologram' performance by Tupac creates legal questions for IP lawyers

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Fans raved about the "hologram" Tupac Shakur's performance at Coachella. For intellectual property lawyers, Tupac’s virtual return to the stage raises some interesting questions.
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More attorneys choosing gradual retirement

May 9, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Economics are one reason why lawyers postpone withdrawal from practice.
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Lawyers should stay away from 'daily deals'

May 9, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
An attorney's inquiry on a listserv led to the Indiana State Bar Association ethics opinion.
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Terms of Art: effecting viral social change

May 9, 2012
Wandini Riggins
Wandini Riggins writes about Indianapolis attorney Kenan L. Farrell and his work with the arts community.
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McGoff: Go on vacation

May 9, 2012
Sharon McGoff writes about why our bodies need vacations and how to take one.
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IMS attorney excels in fast-paced work environment

April 25, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Susan Rivas enjoys the sound of cars zipping around the track at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Her office window overlooks the back of the grandstand, about 100 feet away, where workers are busy readying the stands for thousands of visitors.
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  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

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