Problem-solving courts

Rush rolls out commercial court plan in State of Judiciary

January 28, 2015
Dave Stafford
Commercial courts heralded by Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush in her first State of the Judiciary address could be in business soon, with the first pilots launching as early as this summer, according to judges and lawyers involved in developing the plans.
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Serving those who served

November 5, 2014
Dave Stafford
More veterans courts are popping up around the state, with a focus on individual treatment and establishing mentorships.
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New Bloomington mental health court starting up

October 13, 2014
 Associated Press
A new Monroe County mental health court is aimed at keeping people mentally stable and out of trouble and the community safe, officials said.
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Marion County to create veterans court

October 7, 2014
Dave Stafford
Marion County plans to start a veterans court next year, a specialized problem-solving court that will allow diversion of lower-level criminal offenses for those who served in the military.
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Termination of drug court placement over missed therapy affirmed

August 26, 2014
Dave Stafford
A woman who missed several drug court mental health therapy sessions failed on appeal to prove she was wrongly terminated from the problem-solving court.
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Hamilton County considers veterans court

January 15, 2014
Andrea Muirragui Davis, Dave Stafford
A problem-solving court that could offer diversion programs for veterans charged with minor offenses is under consideration in Noblesville.
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Allen County courts join forces to establish new veterans’ court

November 11, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Allen County will gavel in its veterans’ court Nov. 12 and join a growing list of Indiana jurisdictions creating the problem-solving court especially to serve military veterans.
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Proposed changes to fee schedules in Allen County open to public comment

October 23, 2013
IL Staff
Allen Superior Court is, again, offering for public comment proposed changes to the fees for its alternative court programs.
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Problem-solving courts, CHINS legislation return to house of origin

March 20, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Senate passed several House bills Tuesday, including legislation expanding when a person can participate in a problem-solving court program. The House of Representatives returned bills on children in need of services petitions and prosecutor pensions back to the Senate.
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Senate panel to hear problem-solving courts, ‘sovereign citizen’ bills

March 5, 2013
IL Staff
Proposals to expand services offered by problem-solving courts and to attempt to curtail fraudulent liens and other tactics of so-called sovereign citizens will be heard Wednesday by the Senate Judiciary Committee.
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Problem-solving courts cut recidivism, help defendants

February 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana House Bill 1016 proposes to let court staff provide some rehabilitative services and collect fees for them.
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Governor signs courts, judicial age bills

May 11, 2011
IL Staff
Gov. Mitch Daniels has signed into law changes to various courts around the state, as well as the legislation that removes age restrictions of certain judges who run for office.
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Committees seek comment on problem-solving courts, programs

May 3, 2011
IL Staff
The Court Alcohol and Drug Program Advisory Committee and the Problem-Solving Courts Committee of the Judicial Conference of Indiana are seeking public comment on the new rules governing problem-solving courts and amendments to the court-administered drug and alcohol programs.
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Last day for legislators to file bills

January 13, 2011
IL Staff
Today is the deadline for state senators to file Senate bills to be considered during the 2011 session. State representatives’ deadline for filing House bills was Tuesday and they have until today to file vehicle bills.
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Court defines due process rights for drug court participants

July 30, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals agreed with a defendant that his due process rights were denied when his participation in a drug court program was ended without giving him notice of a hearing, or allowing him to present evidence and cross-examine witnesses.
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Partnership targets Indiana's corrections system

June 28, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
To address Indiana’s growing prison population and increasing related costs, the state is partnering with The Pew Center on the States and the Council of State Governments Justice Center for the first comprehensive review of the state’s criminal code and sentencing policies since 1976.
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Court to award $290,000 for abuse programs

June 3, 2010
The Indiana Court Improvement Program has announced it will be giving away up to $290,000 in grants to programs that help families and children involved in cases of neglect or abuse.
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Judges see more cases that involve veterans

February 17, 2010
Michael Hoskins
For a little more than a year, Grant Superior Judge Mark Spitzer has presided over his local drug court and has witnessed what he describes as remarkable results from the problem-solving court model.
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Judge wins national award for drug court

February 16, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
Noble Superior Judge Michael J. Kramer was nationally recognized for his work as judge of the Noble County Drug Court. Judge Kramer was named an Advocate of the Year at the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America's National Leadership Forum in Washington, D.C. He received the award at a luncheon Thursday.
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Monroe County drug court wins award

January 12, 2010
IL Staff
The Monroe County Drug Treatment Court recently received a national award for its efforts to foster community transformation by reducing drug addiction and crime.
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Comments sought on proposed reentry court rules

September 24, 2008
IL Staff
The Problem-Solving Courts Committee of the Judicial Conference of Indiana is seeking public comment on proposed reentry court rules.
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Vanderburgh expanding forensic diversion program

August 27, 2007
Michael Hoskins
A Vanderburgh County forensic diversion program is expanding to accept impaired drivers into the alternative sentencing program.
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  1. It's a big fat black mark against the US that they radicalized a lot of these Afghan jihadis in the 80s to fight the soviets and then when they predictably got around to biting the hand that fed them, the US had to invade their homelands, install a bunch of corrupt drug kingpins and kleptocrats, take these guys and torture the hell out of them. Why for example did the US have to sodomize them? Dubya said "they hate us for our freedoms!" Here, try some of that freedom whether you like it or not!!! Now they got even more reasons to hate us-- lets just keep bombing the crap out of their populations, installing more puppet regimes, arming one faction against another, etc etc etc.... the US is becoming a monster. No wonder they hate us. Here's my modest recommendation. How about we follow "Just War" theory in the future. St Augustine had it right. How about we treat these obvious prisoners of war according to the Geneva convention instead of torturing them in sadistic and perverted ways.

  2. As usual, John is "spot-on." The subtle but poignant points he makes are numerous and warrant reflection by mediators and users. Oh but were it so simple.

  3. ACLU. Way to step up against the police state. I see a lot of things from the ACLU I don't like but this one is a gold star in its column.... instead of fighting it the authorities should apologize and back off.

  4. Duncan, It's called the RIGHT OF ASSOCIATION and in the old days people believed it did apply to contracts and employment. Then along came title vii.....that aside, I believe that I am free to work or not work for whomever I like regardless: I don't need a law to tell me I'm free. The day I really am compelled to ignore all the facts of social reality in my associations and I blithely go along with it, I'll be a slave of the state. That day is not today......... in the meantime this proposed bill would probably be violative of 18 usc sec 1981 that prohibits discrimination in contracts... a law violated regularly because who could ever really expect to enforce it along the millions of contracts made in the marketplace daily? Some of these so-called civil rights laws are unenforceable and unjust Utopian Social Engineering. Forcing people to love each other will never work.

  5. I am the father of a sweet little one-year-old named girl, who happens to have Down Syndrome. To anyone who reads this who may be considering the decision to terminate, please know that your child will absolutely light up your life as my daughter has the lives of everyone around her. There is no part of me that condones abortion of a child on the basis that he/she has or might have Down Syndrome. From an intellectual standpoint, however, I question the enforceability of this potential law. As it stands now, the bill reads in relevant part as follows: "A person may not intentionally perform or attempt to perform an abortion . . . if the person knows that the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion solely because the fetus has been diagnosed with Down syndrome or a potential diagnosis of Down syndrome." It includes similarly worded provisions abortion on "any other disability" or based on sex selection. It goes so far as to make the medical provider at least potentially liable for wrongful death. First, how does a medical provider "know" that "the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion SOLELY" because of anything? What if the woman says she just doesn't want the baby - not because of the diagnosis - she just doesn't want him/her? Further, how can the doctor be liable for wrongful death, when a Child Wrongful Death claim belongs to the parents? Is there any circumstance in which the mother's comparative fault will not exceed the doctor's alleged comparative fault, thereby barring the claim? If the State wants to discourage women from aborting their children because of a Down Syndrome diagnosis, I'm all for that. Purporting to ban it with an unenforceable law, however, is not the way to effectuate this policy.

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