Real Estate/Construction

Salvation Army sues neighboring Children’s Museum over expansion

May 25, 2017
Scott Olson, IBJ Staff
The Salvation Army is suing the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, claiming its neighbor’s $35 million outdoor expansion project intrudes on its easements and restricts its access to Illinois Street.
More

New Jersey man to get attorney fees, interest in failed real estate deal

May 10, 2017
Olivia Covington
After affirming the denial of summary judgment to northern Indiana landowners who misrepresented a property zoning to a potential buyer, the Indiana Court of Appeals also reversed the denial of attorney fees and prejudgment and post-judgment interest to the buyer.
More

Residents threaten lawsuit against city of Indianapolis over flood wall project

May 9, 2017
Olivia Covington
A group of residents from a northern Indianapolis suburb are threatening legal action against the city if it moves forward with its plans for a flood wall along a canal, a plan they say could subject their homes to serious flood damage.
More

Justices create framework for determining admissibility of immigration status

May 4, 2017
Olivia Covington
After reversing a trial court’s decision to admit a plaintiff’s unauthorized immigrant status as evidence in his case for decreased earning capacity damages, the Indiana Supreme Court laid out a new framework Thursday for determining when immigration status can be admissible.
More

Supreme Court: General contractor assumed duty to sub-subcontractor through contract

April 27, 2017
Olivia Covington
A general contractor assumed a non-delegable duty of care to the employee of a sub-subcontractor through its contractual language, the Indiana Supreme Court decided Wednesday, reversing summary judgment to the general contractor on the issue of duty.
More

Running low on funds, Vonnegut museum seeks speedy outcome to legal fight

April 18, 2017
Scott Olson, IBJ Staff
The Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library is asking a judge to rule quickly on the legal dispute over its failed move to Massachusetts Avenue in Indianapolis, fearing the not-for-profit could run out of money before the case is resolved.
More

Indianapolis officials, landowner lock horns over Brightwood library branch plan

April 5, 2017
Dave Stafford
Thousands each day drive past a sign on Sherman Avenue near 25th Street in Indianapolis bearing an unequivocal statement of Sheena Schmidt’s sentiments and an irritant for some city officials — a billboard-like placard that reads, “Say no to eminent domain.”
More

20-year-old statute being increasingly used for public-private partnership agreements

April 5, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys have noticed use of Indiana Code 5-23, or the Build-Operate-Transfer statute, becoming more popular. Not only is it being used for more public-private partnerships, but it also gives cities and developers a great deal of flexibility in design and implementation.
More

Judge approves $25M Trump University settlement

March 31, 2017
 Associated Press
A judge on Friday approved an agreement for President Donald Trump to pay $25 million to settle lawsuits over his now-defunct Trump University, ending nearly seven years of legal battles with customers who claimed they were misled by failed promises to teach success in real estate.
More

Supreme Court seems divided in property-rights dispute

March 20, 2017
 Associated Press
A divided U.S. Supreme Court struggled Monday over a property rights dispute that could make it tougher for state and local governments to limit development in coastal areas.
More

Indiana considers prohibiting cities from banning Airbnb

March 20, 2017
 Associated Press
Indiana cities and towns wouldn’t be allowed to restrict companies such as Airbnb under a proposal state lawmakers are considering as they wade into the parochial matters of property rights and zoning disputes.
More

Justices remand Bloomington property partition dispute

March 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
A woman’s case to partition and sell a Bloomington property will continue after the Indiana Supreme Court reversed a lower court’s finding that the husband and wife with whom the woman purchased the property were not tenants by the entireties of the property.
More

COA reverses denial of summary judgment to bank

January 26, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals has ruled that U.S. Bank is a bona fide purchaser of an Indianapolis property and was entitled to summary judgment after finding that the mortgage an investment company held on the property could not be found by an adequate title examination.
More

Neighbors sue to block $23M College Avenue development

January 9, 2017
Scott Olson
Neighbors of the site where a local developer plans to build a $23 million apartment and retail project along North College Avenue are seeking to stop the controversial project by taking legal action.
More

Property contract with no-cheating clause enforceable

January 3, 2017
Olivia Covington
A Jefferson County woman must convey her assets in a property she shared with her ex-boyfriend after she became pregnant by another man in breach of a contract she signed with the ex-boyfriend, the Indiana Court of Appeals found Friday.
More

COA affirms ruling for lender in Shelbyville low-income housing dispute

December 21, 2016
Dave Stafford
A general partner developing Shelbyville low-income apartments lost its appeal of rulings that it misappropriated or was in breach of nearly $2.75 million guaranteed for the project and that it should be liable for the lenders’ legal fees of more than $385,000.
More

COA rejects Duke’s claims against proposed Franklin traffic expansion

December 16, 2016
Olivia Covington
Duke Energy of Indiana cannot prevent the city of Franklin from expanding an east-side intersection, the Indiana Court of Appeals found Friday, allowing the city to move forward with a project designed to beautify the State Road 44 corridor off of Interstate 65.
More

Indiana Supreme Court considers general contractor’s duty of care to subcontractors

December 1, 2016
Olivia Covington
In oral arguments on a petition to transfer a case regarding a general contractor’s duty of care to its subcontractors, the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court considered the meaning of the phrase “monitor and implement.”
More

Tax court affirms CVS valuation, stands by prior retail rulings

November 7, 2016
Olivia Covington
A CVS store in Bloomington has won its case against what it said were inaccurate tax assessments after the judge of the Indiana Tax Court rejected the argument that her previous rulings were inaccurate.
More

Bouncing back from the bust

November 2, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Hammered in the recession, real estate law now faces competition from nonlawyers as well as the need to attract new faces.
More

Pittman family dispute escalates with new lawsuit

October 21, 2016
Lindsey Erdody, IBJ Staff
An ongoing family dispute could cause some of the companies related to a retail real estate development in Carmel to be dissolved.
More

Will next governor pave the way for more public-private partnerships?

October 11, 2016
Hayleigh Colombo, IBJ Staff
The controversial 2006 lease of the Indiana Toll Road paved the way for highway projects funded by public-private partnerships in Indiana — including the relatively smooth and nearly finished building of a bridge over the Ohio River at Louisville and the beleaguered construction of a 21-mile stretch of Interstate 69 from Bloomington to Martinsville.
More

Airbnb’s San Francisco showdown may set rules for gig economy

October 6, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Airbnb Inc. has a message for cities that try to enforce rules that crimp its couch-surfing style: See you in court.
More

Judge gives 60 days for owners to raze Battle Ground hotel

October 5, 2016
 Associated Press
A judge has ordered the owners of a decaying Battle Ground hotel to demolish the structure within 60 days due to years of neglect.
More

I-69 developer's missed payments ignites dispute

September 8, 2016
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana mayor blamed Republican Gov. Mike Pence's administration on Wednesday for allowing a private developer to fall behind in payments to subcontractors, leading to a work stoppage on a new section of the Interstate 69 extension project.
More
Page  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

  2. The Department of Education still has over $100 million of ITT Education Services money in the form of $100+ million Letters of Credit. That money was supposed to be used by The DOE to help students. The DOE did nothing to help students. The DOE essentially stole the money from ITT Tech and still has the money. The trustee should be going after the DOE to get the money back for people who are owed that money, including shareholders.

  3. Do you know who the sponsor of the last-minute amendment was?

  4. Law firms of over 50 don't deliver good value, thats what this survey really tells you. Anybody that has seen what they bill for compared to what they deliver knows that already, however.

  5. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

ADVERTISEMENT