Retirement

Dickson’s tenure on Supreme Court celebrated

April 29, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
Members of Indiana’s legal community and state government gathered Friday to honor Indiana Justice Brent Dickson on his last day on the court, including bestowing him with one of the state’s highest honors.
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Magistrate Judge Hussmann turns in gavel but plans to keep working

February 10, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
On Jan. 31, Magistrate Judge William Hussmann Jr. raced his administrative assistant, Shelly James, to the office door. After nearly 28 years, the pair retired together from the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Dickson retirement date set for April 29

January 11, 2016
IL Staff
Justice Brent Dickson will retire from the Indiana Supreme Court April 29, he said Monday in a letter to Gov. Mike Pence.
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Retiring federal Judge Robert Miller Jr. praised for legal analysis and temperament

December 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
With the exception of the year Judge Robert Miller Jr. spent clerking for the late U.S. District Judge Robert Grant, he has spent his entire working life wielding a gavel. He served for 11 years in St. Joseph Superior Court before his appointment to the federal bench.
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Survey: Succession planning a top concern for organizations

December 2, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Thirty-eighty percent of the respondents to the Indiana Lawyer’s 2015 Practicing Law in Indiana survey listed transition or succession planning as the greatest challenge to their organization’s viability. Only the issue of managing costs while protecting quality of service topped this concern, which 42 percent found to be the greatest challenge.
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‘Chic’ Born retiring after 45-year career

November 23, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Saying “it’s time,” Indianapolis attorney Samuel “Chic” Born is retiring from the practice of law at year's end.
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Dickson: ‘I was ready and the time was right’

November 18, 2015
Dave Stafford
Retirement of the second-longest serving justice opens up the fourth Supreme Court vacancy in five years.
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Agreement means what it says, COA rules

August 14, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
While the Indiana Court of Appeals conceded the severance agreement was “not a model of precision,” it disagreed with a trial court’s conclusion that the agreement contained a mistake.
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Friedlander reflects on half-century in law as retirement nears

August 12, 2015
Dave Stafford
Although he's set to retire later this month, COA Judge Ezra "Zeke" Friedlander will continue to serve as a senior judge. Marion Superior Judge Robert Altice will be taking his place.
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Display celebrates Tinder’s career

June 26, 2015
IL Staff
In honor of 7th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge John Daniel Tinder’s retirement, a display has been installed in the main hall of the first floor of the Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse in Indianapolis.
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Pensions vex as ranks of retired partners grow

June 25, 2015
 Bloomberg News
The funding of pension plans remains problematic for many employers, and on June 17 the federal government named well-known attorney and mediation maven Kenneth Feinberg to supervise a new program that allows some pension funds to cut retiree benefits.
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Friedlander to resign from Court of Appeals

February 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
Indiana Court of Appeals Judge Ezra Friedlander will retire in August, the court announced Monday, about a year-and-a-half before he would have faced mandatory retirement.
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Report: Ex-Purdue chancellor’s forced retirement bungled

February 23, 2015
 Associated Press
A newly released report that Purdue University had fought in court to keep secret concluded that school officials bungled the forced retirement of Indiana-Purdue Fort Wayne's former chancellor, causing his departure to turn into an “ugly situation.”
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Settlement reached in former IPFW chancellor's lawsuit

February 4, 2015
 Associated Press
Attorneys for Purdue University say the school has settled a federal lawsuit over the forced retirement of Indiana-Purdue Fort Wayne's former chancellor.
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Senate votes to raise judicial retirement age

January 29, 2015
Dave Stafford
Indiana appellate judges could serve until age 80 under a bill that cleared the Indiana Senate Thursday.
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Explosion case cemented Richmond attorney's reputation

January 26, 2015
 Associated Press
Kent Klinge learned the basics of law in school. But it was in a Connersville courtroom where he became a lawyer. Klinge, who was one of the top trial lawyers in Richmond for more than 25 years in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, retired from practice as a partner at Boston Bever Klinge Cross & Chidester in Richmond on Jan. 1 after a 47-year career.
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Woman loses claim for additional retroactive retirement benefits

January 20, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A retired teacher is not entitled to an additional six months of retroactive retirement benefits from the Indiana Public Retirement System, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Tuesday. Indiana law limits an INPRS member to only six months of retroactive retirement benefits.
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Senate committee advances bill to raise judges’ retirement age

January 7, 2015
Dave Stafford
A proposal to raise the mandatory retirement age for appellate judges from 75 to 80 narrowly advanced in the Indiana General Assembly Wednesday.
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Bill seeks to give Indiana appellate judges more time on the bench

January 5, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Sen. James Buck is again pushing to increase the mandatory retirement age for Indiana appellate judges.
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2014 Year in Review

December 31, 2014
IL Staff
This year could be described as a historic one for Indiana. The state's ban on gay marriage was overturned by the courts, and, for the first time, a woman was chosen as chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court. In fact, women are leading most of the courts in Indiana. In 2014, we saw changes in the law schools, a new criminal code implemented, and attorneys in trouble with the court and the law. (Remember the attorney who doesn't like to wear socks?)
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Turnover of judges marks new era in Bankruptcy Court

December 31, 2014
Dave Stafford
An Indiana federal court that for a dozen years was presided over by the same four judges has undergone a near-total overhaul in the past two years.
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More than 3 dozen Indiana jurists retiring, leaving bench at year’s end

December 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Five judges with a combined bench experience of more than a century are departing the Marion County courts at the end of the year, joining dozens of jurists around the state who are calling it a career.
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ISBA seeks malpractice time-limit legislation

December 3, 2014
A proposal adopted by the Indiana State Bar Association's House of Delegates in October has yet to be formalized, but it recommends legislation that would limit malpractice liability for attorneys to two years after discovery of an error or not more than three years after the conclusion of representation.
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Otte to retire as S.D. bankruptcy judge

December 1, 2014
IL Staff
Judge Frank J. Otte will retire at the end of 2014 after 28 years on the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Bankruptcy Court to hold ceremony for retiring judge

September 24, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana is hosting a private retirement ceremony Thursday in honor of Judge James K. Coachys, who is retiring Sept. 30.
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  1. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  2. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  3. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

  4. I am one of Steele's victims and was taken for $6,000. I want my money back due to him doing nothing for me. I filed for divorce after a 16 year marriage and lost everything. My kids, my home, cars, money, pension. Every attorney I have talked to is not willing to help me. What can I do? I was told i can file a civil suit but you have to have all of Steelers info that I don't have. Of someone can please help me or tell me what info I need would be great.

  5. It would appear that news breaking on Drudge from the Hoosier state (link below) ties back to this Hoosier story from the beginning of the recent police disrespect period .... MCBA president Cassandra Bentley McNair issued the statement on behalf of the association Dec. 1. The association said it was “saddened and disappointed” by the decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for shooting Michael Brown. “The MCBA does not believe this was a just outcome to this process, and is disheartened that the system we as lawyers are intended to uphold failed the African-American community in such a way,” the association stated. “This situation is not just about the death of Michael Brown, but the thousands of other African-Americans who are disproportionately targeted and killed by police officers.” http://www.thestarpress.com/story/news/local/2016/07/18/hate-cops-sign-prompts-controversy/87242664/

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