Richmond

Ex-attorney from Richmond avoids jail for bilking clients

May 20, 2016
 Associated Press
A former Richmond attorney will not spend any time in jail despite pleading guilty to eight felony theft charges of taking money from clients but never filing their bankruptcy petitions.
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Judge limits police expert testimony in excessive force case

December 17, 2015
Dave Stafford
A defense expert may not testify whether he believes a Richmond police officer used excessive force when he punched an unruly man in the face three or four times while the man was handcuffed to a hospital gurney.
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Explosion case cemented Richmond attorney's reputation

January 26, 2015
 Associated Press
Kent Klinge learned the basics of law in school. But it was in a Connersville courtroom where he became a lawyer. Klinge, who was one of the top trial lawyers in Richmond for more than 25 years in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, retired from practice as a partner at Boston Bever Klinge Cross & Chidester in Richmond on Jan. 1 after a 47-year career.
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Justices reverse judgment for defendants in suit involving student’s death

October 29, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has ordered further proceedings in a negligence lawsuit filed by the parents of a special needs student who died after choking on her lunch at school. The justices found there are questions as to whether the parents complied with tort claim notice requirements, so judgment in favor of the defendants is not proper.
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Man gets 55 years for murder of hospital roommate

October 14, 2014
 Associated Press
A man expressed remorse for killing another state hospital patient before a judge sentenced him to 55 years imprisonment.
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Appeals court reverses summary judgment in freezing-fog fall

September 8, 2014
Dave Stafford
A medical worker who sued her employer after slipping and falling in a parking lot made slick by freezing fog may proceed with her lawsuit, a divided Court of Appeals panel ruled, reversing summary judgment in favor of a Richmond hospital.
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COA clarifies jury issue in Richmond student death case

July 31, 2013
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Court of Appeals granted a rehearing in a wrongful death lawsuit filed against a public school corporation by the family of a student with Down syndrome who died after choking at school, refining a question to be presented to a jury.
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Fireworks lawyers help clients with flying colors

July 3, 2013
Dave Stafford
Muncie attorney John H. Brooke has a flair for providing hands-on help to his clients in the fireworks business. Say someone’s unavailable at the last minute to fire off a town’s Fourth of July display. Brooke can handle that.
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On the road, jurists give public access to appellate cases

May 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
It’s no accident that on a college campus in Richmond recently, the Indiana Supreme Court heard a case that involves allegations of hazing and potential liability for an incident at a Wabash College fraternity.
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Justices focus on hazing, duty in Wabash fraternity case

April 24, 2013
Dave Stafford
Indiana Supreme Court justices on Tuesday quizzed attorneys about what constitutes hazing and whether Wabash College and a fraternity chapter owed a duty to protect a pledge injured when fraternity brothers placed him in a chokehold then dropped him.
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Indiana justices hit the road to hear hazing arguments

April 17, 2013
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will travel to Indiana University East in Richmond next week to hear arguments in a hazing lawsuit involving Wabash College.
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Restructuring revises coverage area for some pro bono offices

January 4, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
As of Jan. 1, Indiana has 12 pro bono districts, down from 14. Some districts saw no change in their boundaries. But all saw a sharp decrease in funding from the year before, marking the third straight year of declining funds.
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COA denies Miranda rights appeal in drunken driving case

March 24, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed a trial court’s decision that a man arrested for drunken driving was not entitled to counsel or a Miranda warning when police asked for his consent to a blood draw because he was not being interrogated at the time.
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Court affirms, denies challenge to DNA evidence, new mid-trial witness

October 6, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
The Court of Appeals today affirmed a man’s convictions and sentence for felony robbery despite his challenge to whether the trial court properly admitted DNA evidence and allowed the testimony of a witness discovered mid-trial.
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Lenders meet with borrowers at event

September 29, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Following a statewide event Sept. 1 to help to homeowners who were concerned they might be facing foreclosures, the Indiana Foreclosure Prevention Network hosted another event Sept. 16 in Indianapolis.
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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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