Second Amendment

Shot officer’s suit against gun dealer splits COA

March 17, 2016
Dave Stafford
An Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Officer who was shot and wounded by a suspect he killed returning fire may proceed with his lawsuit against a gun dealer that sold the gun to a straw purchaser, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The officer’s case is supported by law enforcement and public policy organizations.
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Obama says expanding gun background checks no threat to rights

January 5, 2016
 Bloomberg News
President Barack Obama said expanding background checks to cover more firearms transactions won’t trample on the right of Americans to own guns or lead to confiscation of weapons, as he made an emotional pitch for a package of executive actions intended to stem gun violence.
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Obama’s ‘no fly, no buy’ policy would test limits of gun rights

December 18, 2015
 Bloomberg News
President Barack Obama is trying to put Republicans on defense in the U.S. debate over gun rights with a call to ban people on the government’s no-fly list from buying firearms. The trouble is his proposal may be unconstitutional.
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New security measures in full swing at Clarksville Town Hall

July 9, 2015
 Associated Press
Since June 1, a metal detector has been stationed at the Clarksville Town Hall's main entrance on Tuesdays and Thursdays and in front of the doors to Town Court on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The detectors also are used to scan people entering Town Council meetings.
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Debate and discussion of firearms welcomes scholars, experts and members of the public

November 1, 2013
IL Staff
Indiana Tech Law School will examine gun regulations during its inaugural symposium, “On the Question of Regulating Guns,” scheduled for Nov. 8.
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Gun seizure case presents first impression issue

September 25, 2013
Dave Stafford
A man whose 51 guns were ordered seized by a judge who determined him dangerous after his behavior alarmed Bloomington police near the site where missing Indiana University student Lauren Spierer was last seen is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to return his firearms.
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Lawsuits test gun restrictions at polling places, local regulations

September 12, 2012
Dave Stafford
Can you carry a gun to the ballot box? With a few narrow exceptions, the answer appears to be yes. A lawsuit filed last month in St. Joseph Superior Court could clarify further whether a 2011 law that voids local firearm regulations would make efforts to keep guns out of voting precincts illegal.
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7th Circuit upholds gun ban for domestic violence offender

July 14, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
A Wisconsin man who pled guilty to possessing firearms after he was convicted of a domestic battery misdemeanor is not allowed to have those firearms, even though he argued they were used for hunting.
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Past NRA president to speak at law schools

October 30, 2009
IL Staff
A former president of the National Rifle Association will visit two Indiana law schools Nov. 3 to discuss the Second Amendment and gun bans.
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COA: Switchblade ban not unconstitutional

March 24, 2009
Jennifer NelsonMore
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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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