Solo and small firm

Bamberger merger is Indiana’s first in 2017

July 12, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
In the first merger involving an Indiana firm in 2017, Evansville-based Bamberger Foreman Oswald & Hahn LLP will provide a stronger foothold in the Hoosier state to a Kentucky regional law practice and, in return, will gain a deeper bench of expertise to serve its clients.
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Lawyer charged with theft from clients also faces discipline

July 12, 2017
Olivia Covington
An attorney facing felony theft charges in Lake County for allegedly stealing money from her clients is being investigated by the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission for similar conduct.
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Lawyer in gay marriage case joins Indiana congressional race

July 6, 2017
 Associated Press
An attorney who led the lawsuit that overturned Kentucky's gay marriage ban wants the Democratic nomination to challenge first-term Republican U.S. Rep. Trey Hollingsworth for his southern Indiana seat in 2018.
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For lawyers, competency issues differ based on age

June 28, 2017
Olivia Covington
When a group of Indiana lawyers was asked who had ever faced age-related discrimination at work, whether for being too young or too old, nearly half the hands in the room went up.
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ABA president touts resources for Indiana solo, small firms

June 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
President Linda Klein also encouraged advocacy for legal aide services while at the Indiana State Bar Association Solo and Small Firm Conference.
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Attorneys encouraged to practice ‘active relaxation’ outside work

June 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
After a long day of briefs, arguments and client meetings, attorneys might be tempted to go home and relax on the couch. But according to mental health experts, spending evenings in front of the television might not be that relaxing for those who want to fully escape the pressures of work.
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‘Sunrise CLEs’ discuss changing gender markers, avoiding copyright infringement

June 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though the majority of the Indiana State Bar Association’s Solo and Small Firm Conference was filled with experts in various legal fields sharing their in-depth knowledge, conference attendees also had the opportunity to learn a little bit Saturday morning during the conference’s shorter “Sunrise CLE” sessions.
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ISBA session offers tips in dealing with parents of a child with disabilities

June 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though judges are generally thought to be the gatekeepers of the law, in family law situations, parents may try to guard the gates of access to their children.
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New Orleans attorney offers solo and small firms ‘keys’ to better online presence

June 5, 2017
Olivia Covington
There is a clear solution for lawyers who want to recruit better clients – improve your online communications strategy.
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Sexism, ageism focus of small, solo conference session

June 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
Though outward expressions of discrimination against certain types of attorneys in court may have diminished over the years, each attorney, litigant, juror and judge who enters a courtroom brings with them their own set of implicit biases.
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ABA president addresses ISBA solo, small firm conference

June 2, 2017
Olivia Covington
The legal industry is evolving quickly, with technological advancements and societal shifts making the traditional paper-and-pencil model of practicing law nearly obsolete. But for solo and small firm attorneys, the administrative burdens of simply running their firms can significantly eat into the time they would otherwise devote to developing new and more efficient methods of doing their work.
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Portage attorney juggles legal practice with life on the red carpet

May 31, 2017
Olivia Covington
It wasn’t until about 20 years ago that Mark Roscoe taught himself to design and sew to help his mother. He then began doing smaller fashion jobs for his friends and neighbors, and his reputation continued to grow. About five years ago, he took the plunge and began pursuing his design business aggressively.
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Merrillville attorney convicted of mail fraud

May 4, 2017
IL Staff
A Merrillville attorney who was disbarred nearly two years ago for embezzling from a receivership has been convicted of mail fraud in federal court related to that theft.
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Putting technology into practice

April 19, 2017
Olivia Covington
The ISBA’s new law practice management coordinator wants to help solo and small firms stay competitive in today’s market.
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Carmel attorney reaches his goals with top-rated podcast

April 5, 2017
Olivia Covington
Since the launch of his franchise-law focused podcast, attorney Josh Brown has added 22 new clients thanks to the publicity the podcast provides.
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Well-known lawyers choose new horizons after going solo

March 8, 2017
Dave Stafford
Don Lundberg and Mark Waterfill, for years well-known and well-regarded leaders in their practice areas at major Indianapolis law firms, have gone solo.
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For some firms, splitting office space and expenses is best practice

February 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
For many firms, splitting office space and sharing resources is a strategy that makes good business sense. But such arrangements aren’t without challenges.
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Lawyers start business-development networking group

February 1, 2017
Dave Stafford
Two law firms launched in recent years also are launching a networking organization they hope can assist other lawyers in starting their own firms.
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ABA president to speak at ISBA Small, Solo Conference

January 25, 2017
IL Staff
American Bar Association President Linda A. Klein has been confirmed at the keynote speaker for the Indiana State Bar Association’s Solo and Small Firm Conference in June, the ISBA announced Wednesday.
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Report: number of black attorneys decreasing in large firms

January 25, 2017
Olivia Covington
The decline may be due to a lack of African-American partners at the firms and more black attorneys choosing to open their own practices.
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For small and solo firms, financial and succession planning takes commitment

January 25, 2017
Dave Stafford
At 41, Cumberland family law and estate attorney Jessica Lacy thinks a lot about her 10-month-old daughter’s future, but she’s also mindful of the years ahead for those who work with her.
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New ABA Blueprint tool designed to increase solo, small firm efficiency

January 11, 2017
Olivia Covington
The American Bar Associatin's Blueprint, an online legal tech marketplace tool, launched in November 2016 and is meant to enable attorneys working at solo and small firms to quickly and easily find legal technology that meets their firms’ needs.
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Lawyer’s breast cancer diagnosis inspires launch of solo practice

October 19, 2016
Olivia Covington
It was supposed to be a routine mammogram, just something Mary Foley Panszi had to do. But when she received a breast cancer diagnosis, her life and career changed.
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Student-housing developer buys law firm’s historic building

October 6, 2016
IL Staff
An Indianapolis lawyer with a recognizable building on downtown’s Massachusetts Avenue has sold it to a local developer of student housing.
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Avvo, LegalZoom execs tell ISBA legal services delivery must change

October 5, 2016
Dave Stafford
LegalZoom Chief Executive Officer John Suh told a gathering of Indiana lawyers Sept. 29 that solo and small firms whose practices in many cases have struggled for decades may be facing existential challenges, but they shouldn’t blame the internet.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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