Supreme Court of the United States

Justices allow strict enforcement of Trump refugee ban

July 19, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court is granting the Trump administration's request to more strictly enforce its ban on refugees, at least until a federal appeals court weighs in.
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3 condemned Ohio inmates ask high court to delay executions

July 18, 2017
 Associated Press
Three condemned killers with upcoming execution dates asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday for a delay while they continue challenging Ohio’s new lethal injection method.
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Trump administration to appeal travel ban ruling to justices

July 14, 2017
 Associated Press
In another setback for President Donald Trump, a federal judge in Hawaii further weakened the already-diluted travel ban by vastly expanding the list of U.S. family relationships that visitors from six Muslim-majority countries can use to get into the country.
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Arkansas birth certificate ruling could impact Indiana

June 29, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
As lesbian married couples in Indiana wait on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals to rule whether both mothers can be listed on their children’s birth certificates, the Supreme Court of the United States may have just decided the outcome of the case.
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Supreme Court term ended much different than it began

June 28, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court began its term nine months ago with Merrick Garland nominated to the bench, Hillary Clinton favored to be the next president, and the court poised to be controlled by Democratic appointees for the first time in 50 years. Things looked very different when the justices wrapped up their work this week
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Legal fight over Indiana's anti-political robocall law ends

June 28, 2017
 Associated Press
A Chicago-based veterans advocacy group's seven-year struggle to strike down Indiana's ban on political robocalls has ended with the U.S. Supreme Court declining to review a lower-court ruling upholding the law.
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Justices to review New Jersey bid for legal sports betting

June 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States agreed Tuesday to take up New Jersey's bid to allow sports betting at its casinos and racetracks, a case that could lead other states to seek a share of the lucrative market.
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Ruling in travel ban leaves myriad questions unanswered

June 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to partially reinstate President Donald Trump's temporary travel ban has left the effort to keep some foreigners out of the United States in a murky middle ground, with unanswered questions and possibly more litigation ahead.
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Supreme Court last day notable for what was and wasn't said

June 26, 2017
 Associated Press
The last day of the United States Supreme Court's term Monday was notable not only for what was announced but also for what wasn't.
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Supreme Court rules for Missouri church in playground case

June 26, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that churches have the same right as other charitable groups to seek state money for new playground surfaces and other nonreligious needs.
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Trump travel ban partly reinstated; fall court arguments set

June 26, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court is letting a limited version of President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect, a victory for Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency.
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High court rejects new trial request in Boston murder case

June 22, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States on Thursday ruled against a Boston man seeking to overturn his murder conviction because his lawyer failed to object when the trial judge closed the courtroom during jury selection.
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Apple seeks to void patent claims, fees in Qualcomm dispute

June 22, 2017
 Associated Press
Apple is seeking to void some of Qualcomm's patent claims and licensing agreements, intensifying its legal battle with the chip maker over the technology in iPhones and iPads.
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SCOTUS limits ability to strip citizenship

June 22, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States on Thursday limited the government's ability to strip U.S. citizenship from immigrants for lying during the naturalization process.
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Public outcry may be able to keep offensive trademarks at bay

June 20, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
While Monday’s decision from the Supreme Court of the United States that barred the federal government from asserting which names are offensive has been viewed as a victory for the Washington Redskins, a high school in northern Indiana may provide an example of what the eight justices were trying to accomplish.
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US high court curbs suits against companies in Plavix case

June 19, 2017
 Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court gave companies a new tool to defeat some legal claims, siding with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. in a bid to limit a consumer lawsuit in California over its Plavix blood thinner.
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SCOTUS takes on fight over partisan electoral maps

June 19, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States is taking on a case about partisan advantage in redistricting that could affect elections across the United States.
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Justices say law on offensive trademarks is unconstitutional

June 19, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down part of a law that bans offensive trademarks, ruling in favor of an Asian-American rock band called the Slants and giving a major boost to the Washington Redskins in their separate legal fight over the team name.
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Trump visiting Supreme Court as justices weigh travel ban

June 15, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump is making his first U.S. Supreme Court visit at a moment of high legal drama. The justices are weighing what to do with the president's ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries.
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Gorsuch has unanimous first opinion for Supreme Court

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
Justice Neil Gorsuch's first Supreme Court opinion Monday stayed true to what Gorsuch promised in his nomination hearing and to the reputation for good writing he developed as an appellate judge.
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Justices strike down gender differences in citizenship law

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States on Monday struck down part of an unusual law that treats fathers and mothers differently when it comes to conferring citizenship on children born outside the U.S.
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High court ruling speeds up generic biotech drug approval

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
A unanimous United States Supreme Court is speeding up the time for generic biotech drugs to become available to the public in a ruling that means a loss of billions in sales to the makers of original versions.
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Justices side with Microsoft in Xbox 360 class action case

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States is giving Microsoft Corp. another chance to stop a class action lawsuit filed by owners of the Xbox 360 video game system who claim the console has a design defect that scratches game discs.
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Ginsburg earns $204,000 from book of collected writings

June 9, 2017
 Associated Press
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg earned $204,000 last year in royalties from her new book, a collection of writings and speeches from the court's oldest member.
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Meet America's latest fitness star: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

June 6, 2017
 Associated Press
Jane Fonda, Richard Simmons and Ruth Bader Ginsburg? The 84-year-old Supreme Court justice is about to join the ranks of workout superstars with a book about her exercise routine.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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