Taft Stettinius & Hollister

Slaughter to join Indiana Supreme Court Monday

June 7, 2016
IL Staff
Geoffrey G. Slaughter will be sworn as an Indiana Supreme Court justice next week, the court announced Tuesday. Chief Justice Loretta H. Rush will administer the oath of office Monday in a brief, private ceremony, which will allow Slaughter, formerly a partner with Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, to begin deciding cases and handling administrative matters with his colleagues.
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Pence appoints Slaughter to replace Dickson on Supreme Court

May 9, 2016
Gov. Mike Pence Monday named Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP partner Geoffrey Slaughter to the Indiana Supreme Court. The veteran litigator will replace Justice Brent Dickson who retired from the court April 29.
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Pence picks Taft attorney as next Supreme Court justice

May 9, 2016
IL Staff
Gov. Mike Pence has selected Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP partner Geoffrey Slaughter as Indiana's 109th justice. Pence made the announcement at 1 p.m. Monday from his office in the Statehouse.
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Cost to shield Indiana lawmakers over emails hits $160,000

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
The legal fight to shield Indiana lawmakers from having to release email correspondence with lobbying groups has cost taxpayers at least $160,000.
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Hicks to be next firm-wide managing partner at Taft

March 9, 2016
IL Staff
Indianapolis partner Robert J. Hicks will be the next firm-wide managing partner at Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, the firm announced Tuesday.
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Hostetler, Kincaid, Slaughter picked as Indiana Supreme Court finalists

March 9, 2016
Dave Stafford
Two judges with extensive business litigation backgrounds and an Indianapolis appellate litigator were named finalists to succeed retiring Justice Brent Dickson on the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Taft bolsters IP practice with 10 lawyers from rival firm

June 17, 2015
Scott Olson, IBJ Staff
Taft Stettinius Hollister LLP has pulled off a major coup in the Indianapolis legal community by taking half the intellectual property practice from rival law firm Krieg DeVault LLP.
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Midwest firms are forgoing headquarters

December 4, 2013
Dave Stafford
The recent Taft merger shows that expansion leads to a shrinking of traditional "home office" roles.
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Associate survey places Taft, Ice Miller, FBD in top Midwest 15 firms

July 11, 2013
IL Staff
Vault.com’s annual ranking of law firms has landed three firms with Indiana ties in the top 15 in the Midwest, according to associates who work in this region.
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Attorneys must financially prepare for life during retirement

May 22, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Law firms use 401(k)s to help employees save for their golden years.
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Firms raise funds for lung association

April 11, 2012
IL Staff
Indianapolis firms participated in the American Lung Association's Fight for Air Climb to raise money.
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Prioritizing increases ease of mergers

January 18, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
When considering whether to merger your firm with another, several factors must be considered, including avoiding geographic overlap and being honest with employees.
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Bar foundation receives pledge for civics education

August 29, 2011
IL Staff
A third law firm has signed on as a visionary sponsor for the Indiana Bar Foundation’s We the People civics education program. Evansville firm Bamberger Foreman Oswald & Hahn has pledged $10,000 in support of the program, the foundation announced Friday, joining Barnes & Thornburg and Taft Stettinius & Hollister as top-level sponsors.
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Snow closes some federal, county courts

January 28, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The foot or more of snow dumped on the southern two-thirds of Indiana hasn't stopped some attorneys from making it to their offices today, but it has closed some courts around the state.
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  1. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  2. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  3. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  4. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  5. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

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