Technology Columns

Technology Untangled: Versatile conference calling available with Spiderphone

October 9, 2013
Stephen Bour
Spiderphone sounds like the hotline for that imaginary masked superhero. It is, instead, a useful and inexpensive Web-assisted telephone conferencing system that makes it easy to set up and conduct multiple-caller speakerphone meetings.
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Technology Untangled: Add communication flexibility to tablets and smartphones

January 16, 2013
Stephen Bour
I was looking for ways to make Wi-Fi tablets more versatile as communication tools and found several interesting applications. Today we will look at apps to turn your Wi-Fi tablet, or iPod Touch, into a push-to-talk (PTT) walkie-talkie, a device for standard SMS texting, and even a free wireless telephone.
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Technology Untangled: Smartphone app allows discreet recording

July 18, 2012
Stephen Bour
Stephen Bour writes about an Android application from ACLU-NJ that allows people to record encounters with police.
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Column: Innovative trial techniques on a shoestring budget

November 23, 2011
Editorial Indiana
Legal technology consultant Deanna Finney offers inexpensive trail and practice strategies that all lawyers can incorporate.
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Technology Untangled: QR codes provide quick info for smartphones

July 20, 2011
Stephen Bour
While relatively new to smartphones, this type of two-dimensional matrix barcode has actually been in existence since 1994.
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Technology Untangled: Google offers useful and fun features

June 8, 2011
Stephen Bour
Almost everyone is familiar with the popular and useful Google search engine. If you take a closer look at Google’s main page, (google.com) you will see a small menu choice named “more.” I did some exploring into that drop-down list and discovered a wide variety of useful, functional, and fun features. Today we will look at just a few of the many extras that Google offers.
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Tablets, smartphones, and netbooks converge

March 16, 2011
Stephen Bour
It is obvious that tablet computers like the iPad and its many competitors are the hottest segment in mobile computing today. Today’s article will look at some of the approaches being taken toward the convergence between smartphones, tablets, netbooks and notebooks.
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Technology Untangled: Overcome odd twists to solve tech issues

October 13, 2010
Stephen Bour
Let’s review some technical problems and solutions that have come across my desk in the past few months. It seems like even the apparently straightforward issues often take an odd twist
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Technology Untangled: Multifunction copier lacks key functions

July 21, 2010
Stephen Bour
Bour takes a look at a multifunction copier from Canon that disappointed him.
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Technology Untangled: New conference phone offers unique features

June 23, 2010
Stephen Bour
Stephen Bour purchased a new piece of office technology recently: a high-quality conference phone with impressive features.
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Technology Untangled: Windows 7 provides compatibility with XP

April 28, 2010
Stephen Bour
One of the problems with upgrading to a new computer every few years is that you often must upgrade to a new version of Windows. This time around, it's Windows 7.
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Technology Untangled: Don't be intimidated by hard drive upgrade

March 31, 2010
Stephen Bour
Screwdriver: Check. $47 hard drive cloning device: Check. That's the complete list of tools needed to EASILY upgrade your computer's hard drive.
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Technology Untangled: Texting is not just for teens

February 3, 2010
Stephen Bour
I must admit that until recently I didn't think much of using a cell phone for sending text messages. However, since I purchased a new phone, I've started to experiment with it, and I am surprised to report that I have found some practical as well as fun uses for this technology.
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  1. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  2. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  3. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  4. I totally agree with John Smith.

  5. An idea that would harm the public good which is protected by licensing. Might as well abolish doctor and health care professions licensing too. Ridiculous. Unrealistic. Would open the floodgates of mischief and abuse. Even veteranarians are licensed. How has deregulation served the public good in banking, for example? Enough ideology already!

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